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Both of my older children (now with kids of their own) used good old fashioned, 4 castor wheel walkers. My son walked at 11 months and has no back, hip, or tendon problems. My daughter walked at 9 months old - yes - and used the walker ALOT, before she walked unattended at 9 months. She is an elite athlete and also has no tendon, hip problems. She did have ...


1

My pediatrician no longer recommends taking temperature rectally due to the risk of injury. Similar to a prior commenter, the thermometer doesn't have to be uber-accurate. You basically need to know if they have a temperature, or have a temperature that requires emergency care. Both of those fall in a range, so being off by a degree won't end the world. ...


1

I had mommy thumb too and ended up going to an orthopedist for help. Here's what he told me, which worked almost immediately... When picking up your child, don't hook your hands under the arms. Instead, grasp his/her torso and squeeze in. This transfers the strain from your thumb (where the tendon is strained), to the entire hand and your forearm. It also ...


1

Allergies to cats are believed by many sourced to be cause by saliva, urine and dander. Allergies to pollen brought in on cat's fur have also occaisionally been mistaken for an actual allergy to cat's fur itself. Before I suggest strategies to help combat allergies, I'd like to stress the importance of actually be sure as whether your child has an allergy ...


4

Toxoplasmosis parasites. The kids could get the same from playing in the garden though. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/toxoplasmosis/basics/prevention/con-20025859


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Actually, most studies show the opposite - that having a pet is good for children's health. Specifically, kids exposed to animals when young have a lower risk for developing pet related allergies later in life, and pets in general have been shown to lower stress levels. There are a few diseases that can be passed from a cat to a child, but for a cat who is ...


1

Read Stanley Coren, The Lefthander Syndrome to get your bearings. It's a bit messy, but Coren's messiness corresponds to the research when he wrote his book. One piece that might be pulled is that the human race does not appear to have two populations of "right-handed" and "left-handed," or three counting ambidexterity, but rather two populations of "strong ...


1

I'm ambidextrous. I too, like many others switched back and forth between hands when writing as a kindergartener. The teacher threatened to beat my hands with a Number 1 pencil (the fat ones). Public teachers were allowed to do that back then. I then switched to my left hand at a weird (non-optimal angle). I still only write with my left hand. I catch ...


2

There are many good answers here, but the reason for making a chose is to select the hand that is to train the writing. Small mussels and memory training with writing is of the essence and it will take double the time to train both hands taking time from other crucial developmental activity and tutoring time. One nice trick to help the child select the hand ...


2

I am 61 years old. When aged 6, I broke my left arm. Through grade 3 I would write using the hand that was most "convenient", as in which side of the paper the writing utensil sat. I also wrote on blackboards most often with my right hand. Today, I write and eat left-handed, but play most sports right-handed. I do housework with either, which is ...


1

In Belgium, in the early seventies, I was forced, in school, to write with my left hand. My brother in law who had the same age went to another school and wasn't forced to change. Recently, somebody showed me an old test used by family doctors to tell witch was the dominant hand. - Give the child (or adult) a paper in front, give him 2 pens, one in the ...


0

I'm apparently a left dominant milti hander. Was tested when i was 5 or 6 because of the same type of confusion that you are describing. I write with my left except on a white board i use my right. Untill a couple years ago. Now i write left handed on both. When play pool i switch back because my left is better for long shots but right is better ...


4

Figuring out your dominant hand is correlated with fine motor development. Your son isn't delayed, because there is a wide natural range of development he is still well within. Kindergarten used to be largely about working on fine motor skills as a prerequisite to writing, but unfortunately, schools have started to push writing younger and younger, when ...


2

A few years ago in a psychology class we studied human perception, and I learned that people are not just right or left handed, they are also right or left eyed. I propose that if there seems no obvious difference in dexterity between the sides, you judge based on what eye is dominant, since it almost always* matches the dominant hand, and is quite closely ...


11

It's entirely possible your child is ambidextrous, but I think the other answerers are jumping the gun a bit. First off, 'handedness' is not a binary (or trinary) thing: it's a continuum. Some people are essentially 100% right handed, some 100% left, and some are ... mixed. I'm in that range. I'm mostly right handed - I do everything right handed that ...


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A good starting resource is https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Handedness To help you discover the state-of-handedness of your son, some methods are mentioned here, specifically; a Purdue Pegboard Test can objectively measure motor accuracy.


41

I have still not identified my dominant hand, and I'm 66 years old. I voluntarily switched from left to right for writing when I was 7, and was going to have to start using pen-and-ink instead of pencil. Generally, I use whichever hand I learned with for a given task. The only significant problem is that I started using scissors in my left hand. It would ...


41

Ambidexterity can be a very positive thing, however that uncertainty at early school levels can be a problem both for teachers, and for your child if you are trying to help them improve their handwriting. A choice you can make if the child really doesn't show any preference is to decide on one and teach them to use that hand for writing consistently. This ...


10

A common method to find out which hand is dominant is to observe which hand someone uses intuitively when they try to catch something. Take a small item, tell your son to "catch!" and throw it in his direction. When there are no consistent results, your son might be ambidextrous. This is uncommon, but often a good thing because it usually correlates with an ...


2

Expressed milk is the next best alternative only when breastfeeding is not possible. When you breastfeed directly, the physical contact with your baby helps your body to create antibodies to germs in his environment, your body creates antibodies in response to cues from the baby's saliva and other secretions. When breastfeeding directly, your body will ...


2

My daughter didn't have allergies, but she did have quite bad reflux, and also had oral motor issues that made eating difficult (we feed her now through a g-tube). She also required anti-seizure medicine orally, so keeping her food down was even more important than just weight gain. The tendency when a child is underweight is to overfeed, but this can ...



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