Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

Good question, and I see where you would be concerned. First, I don't think the breast milk had anything to do with it, because formula fed babies are usually fatter, and you've got the opposite going here. Instead, it seems to be more about the exercise Sneha gets that Rose doesn't. If they eat the same amount of food, but Sneha burns it all off while ...


1

I've known people who did fly with newborns at around this age, and it's certainly possible to do; note the caveats Ida and Anongoodnurse note. I'd add one more, which is why I wouldn't do this. A seven week old still has an underdeveloped immune system. A baby doesn't have a fully functional immune system until around six months, and until three months ...


5

@anongoodnurse's answer is great, but I want to add some things from personal observation: I have flown with a baby as young as 4 months, and it was not an issue. The younger the baby is the easier, since they sleep more. I think a 7 week baby will be fine (provided no health issues, not pre-mature and so forth). ask you pediatrician if there is any ...


5

Please note that some airlines will not let you breastfeed on a flight, regardless of what is said when you purchase a ticket. For the first few weeks of a newborn's life, usually the baby's doctor prefers that she be kept in relative isolation (friends and family). After that, it's fine to take her out into the public provided that the baby is healthy. ...


3

It really depends on the age of the child, but I'll try to deal with the most common and realistic danger. Choking hazards Especially for adults who aren't use to children - they will put nearly anything in their mouth/nose/ears (some children avoid the nose/ear, but it varies by child). It's their way of exploring their world. But older children are still ...


3

If you plotted a graph with the x axis as Time spent and the y axis as Quality of care, you would not get a straight line on a continuous incline. Too little time is not good, but there is not a direct corellation between time spent and quality of care, nor would it likely be a bell-shaped curve. Are there accepted standards of practice for what ...


0

We use these citronella bracelets and (for us at least) they work great. As long as they don't get too wet you can even take them off, stow them in a plastic bag, and use them again for a day or two (our rule of thumb is when you stop smelling the citronella, replace it.) Once our 3 year old gets bitten (he reacts pretty badly, too), we make a big deal ...


3

Where I live we have two seasons, Winter and Mosquito, so based on decades of experience the best thing is to avoid getting bitten (ounce of prevention = pound of cure) so try: Wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants etc. You can put mosquito repellent onto the clothes if you are worried about your child's skin reacting to DEET. Avoid going out in the ...


1

My child had some rashes where mosquitoes bit him - and his pediatrician told us to not use repellant all the time, so we had to mosquito-proof his bedroom. I made fine mesh panels with neodymium magnets along the wooden rim (the window frame was made of iron, so the magnets had a strong grip, and were easy to remove. I also bought two of those electrical ...


1

IME the susceptibility to mosquito bites is different from child to child and is greater in smaller children. Tell your child that it's best to ignore those bites. (It can't right now, but it's still the right thing to teach.) Wait. (It will get better the oder he becomes.) Yes, you can apply a lot of pastes and other stuff, but IMO this just makes ...


6

If you get to the bite quickly enough, AfterBite can work miracles. After the fact, our family uses Solarcaine which includes a mild anesthetic and also cools the skin. In terms of preventing bleeding and scabbing, preventing scratching is key, so anything that reduces the itch at the beginning will help. Also, once a bite is scratched, the healing damage ...


4

If you are in the states there are several spray on remedies which seem to work pretty well and you can find them in most drugstores. If you want something more natural my family remedy is used tea bags, fresh but cooled. You press them against the bite for 5 minutes or so. I don't know why but it seems to work. Really though if your kid is a skeeter ...


2

Children are mostly at greater risk than adults because they are ignorant of dangers adults are aware of. Adults know (or should know) not to run into the street, stick metal objects into electrical outlets, or poke badgers with sticks. They know not to eat paint chips, chew electrical cords, or wrap blind pulls around their necks. It's also true that ...



Top 50 recent answers are included