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50

There's a level of disagreement about whether children should be allowed in "adult settings," and you can get all sorts of opinions on what's appropriate (both for the sake of the child, and for the sake of other patrons). Is this something people do? Yes. It's pretty unusual, but clearly not unknown or impossible. I did take an infant to a microbrewery ...


41

Ambidexterity can be a very positive thing, however that uncertainty at early school levels can be a problem both for teachers, and for your child if you are trying to help them improve their handwriting. A choice you can make if the child really doesn't show any preference is to decide on one and teach them to use that hand for writing consistently. This ...


41

I have still not identified my dominant hand, and I'm 66 years old. I voluntarily switched from left to right for writing when I was 7, and was going to have to start using pen-and-ink instead of pencil. Generally, I use whichever hand I learned with for a given task. The only significant problem is that I started using scissors in my left hand. It would ...


39

I see no reason to think this inappropriate behavior. Did you see any harm being done to the infant? There was no smoking in its presence. The baby was safely tucked into its bjorn carrier (already a positive parent sign), not being passed among the crowd, or mouthing everything in sight. She was having some drinks which she may have sorely missed while ...


28

Actually, most studies show the opposite - that having a pet is good for children's health. Specifically, kids exposed to animals when young have a lower risk for developing pet related allergies later in life, and pets in general have been shown to lower stress levels. There are a few diseases that can be passed from a cat to a child, but for a cat who is ...


17

Baby wearing is great for a baby! And at such a young age they tend to sleep for a couple hours, eat and then just hang out interacting with their world. Change their diaper and repeat. It gets pretty mundane so introducing a new environment can be a nice change for both mom and baby. It's not a place the baby can lay around and explore their surroundings ...


15

I don't drink, and neither does my wife, so I don't exactly spend much time in bars - so I haven't seen this, but that's not really evidence of anything in my book. I also don't know the law in this regard, so if it's actually illegal, obviously you shouldn't do it. Additionally, as was pointed out in other answers, the effect of alcohol on a nursing baby ...


13

We regularly took our first child to the pub with us. Every Friday from when he was about 10 days old until about 9 months. The reasons why: so we could still socialise with our friends so we weren't stuck in a house all day with a child. This is an essential part of remaining sane he slept only from about 2am to about 4am so we wanted to maximise the ...


12

Ask yourself: How do children experience their world? Most languages have words like "grasp", that mean to understand something and to touch it. Good schools/educators try to incorporate as many sensory channels and as many different ways to teach as possible. In my child's primary school letters and numbers are taught by having the children walk the ...


12

First off, congrats :) Go to the doctor and be honest! My wife and I did the same thing during her first pregnancy. Our daughter, now 5, is as bright and cheery and happy and healthy as any other kid in her class. Additional stress isn't good for either your or your baby. So calm down first. Only then can you make rational adult decisions. Just make ...


12

If it's a nice pub, where people get together for a few drinks and a good time, with a bit of music in the back, I honestly can see no reasonable difference between that location and doing the exact same thing in the setting of your own (or a friend or family members) home. I would not think twice about someone taking their child to a birthday party or ...


11

Quit freaking out. That's the first thing to do. People get pregnant, they have kids. This is normal. It may not be normal for you, but, it is, in general, a fact of life. So, you can do it. The challenge is to be the best mother you can be, and that means starting now to make choices that are good choices for both you, and the baby. Once you start making ...


11

Of course it can be done and it happens thousands of times every day. The key questions for you is probably "Is the the right choice for me and our baby?". This depends on a variety of factors, a lot of which are very personal, so only you can decide. A few points There is a fair amount if research out there on which one is "better". Unfortunately a lot ...


11

It's entirely possible your child is ambidextrous, but I think the other answerers are jumping the gun a bit. First off, 'handedness' is not a binary (or trinary) thing: it's a continuum. Some people are essentially 100% right handed, some 100% left, and some are ... mixed. I'm in that range. I'm mostly right handed - I do everything right handed that ...


10

I can think of nothing wrong with this. On the other hand, there are various good reasons for doing it: Parents of newborns tend to get cooped up at home. Getting out and socializing is important to relieve this, and some parents don't have access to (or don't want) babysitting. For first-time parents, going out in public with a newborn can be a bit scary. ...


10

A common method to find out which hand is dominant is to observe which hand someone uses intuitively when they try to catch something. Take a small item, tell your son to "catch!" and throw it in his direction. When there are no consistent results, your son might be ambidextrous. This is uncommon, but often a good thing because it usually correlates with an ...


9

You cannot prevent bacteria from entering your body. They enter constantly, every time you use a toothbrush, rub your eyes, eat a bite of food, breathe in a cougher's aerosolized droplets, etc. In reality, having the right kind of bacteria colonizing our oronasopharynx, our skin, our GI tract, etc. prevents many pathogenic bacteria from getting a foothold ...


9

See: Medline Plus: Fluoxetine - US National Library of Medicine / National Institutes of Health, 11/15/2014 Fluoxetine (marketed as Prozac) Information - US Food and Drug Administration, 12/16/2014 Side effects: Information specific to: Fluoxetine 20mg capsules when used in Depression. - UK NHS Choices The following side-effects have also been ...


8

Childbirth hurts. It always has. But the amount of pain you experience depends on many factors, such as the position of the baby, whether you have or haven't ruptured the amniotic membrane, your pain threshold, your anxiety level, your position in labor, and a host of other factors, many of which you have no control over. Can a first time mother do it ...


7

It appears there are no significant studies of this type of development in children at present [so far as I could identify]. From my lay perspective the only study which looked relevant was Learning about gravity: segmental assessment of upright control as infants develop independent sitting (2015) but it did not address this question directly. What we can ...


6

No, you're not over-reacting. The health care system exists for everyone. People go to the Emergency Room for far less serious problems than your wife has, and that's fine (I work in an Emergency Room.) Please know that doctors are sympathetic to this situation. I can think of almost nothing worse than to be nauseated 24/7. Normal nausea of pregnancy ...


6

If you get to the bite quickly enough, AfterBite can work miracles. After the fact, our family uses Solarcaine which includes a mild anesthetic and also cools the skin. In terms of preventing bleeding and scabbing, preventing scratching is key, so anything that reduces the itch at the beginning will help. Also, once a bite is scratched, the healing damage ...


6

Please note that some airlines will not let you breastfeed on a flight, regardless of what is said when you purchase a ticket. For the first few weeks of a newborn's life, usually the baby's doctor prefers that she be kept in relative isolation (friends and family). After that, it's fine to take her out into the public provided that the baby is healthy. ...


6

11 is about when boys often start growing to their adult size; often it's a bit later, but 11 is certainly within reasonable bounds for that. Cravings for particular foods are often a sign that you need something in them. In the case of milk, you have a lot of things - some protein, some calcium, some vitamins, but mostly it's a rich, caloric drink. It's ...


6

A good starting resource is https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Handedness To help you discover the state-of-handedness of your son, some methods are mentioned here, specifically; a Purdue Pegboard Test can objectively measure motor accuracy.


5

Hygiene Several points to address here: one can sanitize pumps with more intense chemical agents than one would use on a breast Breasts, nipples of a typical-healthy-relatively-clean mother are perfectly safe for a child. A breast can be "dirty", just as a bottle can be either not cleaned well enough or cleaned very well but with some of the ...


5

@anongoodnurse's answer is great, but I want to add some things from personal observation: I have flown with a baby as young as 4 months, and it was not an issue. The younger the baby is the easier, since they sleep more. I think a 7 week baby will be fine (provided no health issues, not pre-mature and so forth). ask you pediatrician if there is any ...


5

It really depends on the age of the child, but I'll try to deal with the most common and realistic danger. Choking hazards Especially for adults who aren't use to children - they will put nearly anything in their mouth/nose/ears (some children avoid the nose/ear, but it varies by child). It's their way of exploring their world. But older children are still ...


5

I haven't been able to find anything remotely official (e.g. NIH study), but found this so far: John Pearce and Jane Bidder, authors of "Baby and Toddler Sleep Program: How to Get Your Child to Sleep," warn parents to wait as long as possible to introduce a pillow, preferably until a toddler reaches 18 months of age or later. (src) The main reason to ...


5

I'd be more worried about someone bringing a 16-year-old to a bar than a baby. The 16 y.o. might drink; the baby presumably will not. If the bar was a rough place where drunken brawls regularly break out, then yes, I'd say bringing a baby is a bad idea. If the mother got drunk and did something to endanger the baby, of course that would be a problem. Or if ...



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