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41

I have still not identified my dominant hand, and I'm 66 years old. I voluntarily switched from left to right for writing when I was 7, and was going to have to start using pen-and-ink instead of pencil. Generally, I use whichever hand I learned with for a given task. The only significant problem is that I started using scissors in my left hand. It would ...


41

Ambidexterity can be a very positive thing, however that uncertainty at early school levels can be a problem both for teachers, and for your child if you are trying to help them improve their handwriting. A choice you can make if the child really doesn't show any preference is to decide on one and teach them to use that hand for writing consistently. This ...


11

It's entirely possible your child is ambidextrous, but I think the other answerers are jumping the gun a bit. First off, 'handedness' is not a binary (or trinary) thing: it's a continuum. Some people are essentially 100% right handed, some 100% left, and some are ... mixed. I'm in that range. I'm mostly right handed - I do everything right handed that ...


10

A common method to find out which hand is dominant is to observe which hand someone uses intuitively when they try to catch something. Take a small item, tell your son to "catch!" and throw it in his direction. When there are no consistent results, your son might be ambidextrous. This is uncommon, but often a good thing because it usually correlates with an ...


8

Techniques and tools to improve handwriting: Knowing how to form the letters is important so that they aren't stopping and starting. Training the muscles to make smooth movements takes practice and, of course, time for development. My kids are Lego fiends, who enjoy using the tiniest of pieces and their hand-writing is atrocious unless they concentrate and ...


6

A good starting resource is https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Handedness To help you discover the state-of-handedness of your son, some methods are mentioned here, specifically; a Purdue Pegboard Test can objectively measure motor accuracy.


6

Your son's handwriting is changing is because the circumstances are changing. At home, your son is, as you say, being constantly supervised and reminded to try hard. At school, your son is probably not watched to make sure he's taking his time while writing. He may also feel rushed to just get it done, or may just be doing it as fast as possible to get it ...


5

I have to agree with noelicus that, at her age, she's still "practicing" handwriting rather than just using handwriting as a means to an end. If I recall correctly, your daughter is 6 which is, perhaps, a little young for typing. Plus, there's the question of whether or not her fine motor skills are refined enough to learn to type correctly. I mean, if ...


5

At this age, you need not focus on "the right way" of holding a pencil, and fine-motor skills yet. It is recommended to buy big pencils/pens which he can hold more easily. Making him use too small and thin pens now may in fact harm the development of his fine motor skills, making his muscles tense. It is better to defer this until the age of 6-8 when his ...


4

Figuring out your dominant hand is correlated with fine motor development. Your son isn't delayed, because there is a wide natural range of development he is still well within. Kindergarten used to be largely about working on fine motor skills as a prerequisite to writing, but unfortunately, schools have started to push writing younger and younger, when ...


4

I think you've answered your own question when you say to do both. From personal experience I don't think cursive is necessary any more. I'm young enough that I never use it. Handwriting ie penmanship is still important for me of course, but not cursive. The only exception is that sometimes I find that I can write faster in cursive so this helpful for ...


3

The teachers are not paying as much attention as you are with homework -- if nothing else because they have to deal with many students, and cannot work one-on-one all day with him. Without that constant encouragement he reverts, producing easier, faster, and sloppier work. Arguing with the standards (generally set by the state, not the district or school, ...


3

Cursive handwriting is designed so that you can write it fast and still have it be legible and reasonably pretty. It's based on having a rhythmic movement up and down while having a smooth movement forward. Learning it is a useful skill. Beware though, in some places, like Scandinavia, a cursive form is being taught that is designed to not be useful, but to ...


3

While i agree with Pierre and P├ęter, sometimes parents feel like "you're either getting better or you're getting worse"; that if you're not doing anything to make it good, that you're letting it get bad. In that spirit, one thing you could do would be to ask the niece, daily, to write something general about her day: what play time was like, what they had ...


2

I fully agree with @Pierre's answer. Don't try to "improve" her handwriting. That may seem to work in the short term, and do much damage in the long term. At this age, there can be huge differences in physical development between individual children, which have nothing to do with "intelligence" or "skills" or anything, and which - under normal circumstances ...


2

As a parent, I agree with giving it time as handwriting is a skill that does take time to develop. as an occupational therapist, handwriting is usually a symptom of something else: weakness, low muscle tone, decreased hand eye coordination , etc. I don't intend on diagnosing or worrying anybody but I usually recommend the patients I see to begin general ...


2

Left-handers make all sorts of adaptions. When writing, I've seen many left-handed Americans curve their hand and arm around so that they can 'see' what they've just written. I never picked up that trick, instead clutching my pen or pencil in more of a fist grip than the 'accepted' grip which holds the pen between the thumb and first two fingers. It lets me ...


2

Start by having her tell you the stories and have you write them down. Leave space on each page for him/her to illustrate the book. Make it a multi day project. when there is any resistance, suggest you can continue another day. When you reach a point where there is enough pages to read bring it back to the child at bed time and suggest it as a bed time ...


2

Our child used to dislike writing greatly. Things started to change when we took the advice of getting him to do little jobs for us like writing shopping lists or making lists of things he wanted to take on trips that he didn't want to forget. Then came labelling pictures which he wanted to start doing more and more -- writing names on people etc -- and it ...


2

A few years ago in a psychology class we studied human perception, and I learned that people are not just right or left handed, they are also right or left eyed. I propose that if there seems no obvious difference in dexterity between the sides, you judge based on what eye is dominant, since it almost always* matches the dominant hand, and is quite closely ...


2

There are many good answers here, but the reason for making a chose is to select the hand that is to train the writing. Small mussels and memory training with writing is of the essence and it will take double the time to train both hands taking time from other crucial developmental activity and tutoring time. One nice trick to help the child select the hand ...


2

I am 61 years old. When aged 6, I broke my left arm. Through grade 3 I would write using the hand that was most "convenient", as in which side of the paper the writing utensil sat. I also wrote on blackboards most often with my right hand. Today, I write and eat left-handed, but play most sports right-handed. I do housework with either, which is ...


1

Read Stanley Coren, The Lefthander Syndrome to get your bearings. It's a bit messy, but Coren's messiness corresponds to the research when he wrote his book. One piece that might be pulled is that the human race does not appear to have two populations of "right-handed" and "left-handed," or three counting ambidexterity, but rather two populations of "strong ...


1

I'm ambidextrous. I too, like many others switched back and forth between hands when writing as a kindergartener. The teacher threatened to beat my hands with a Number 1 pencil (the fat ones). Public teachers were allowed to do that back then. I then switched to my left hand at a weird (non-optimal angle). I still only write with my left hand. I catch ...


1

In Belgium, in the early seventies, I was forced, in school, to write with my left hand. My brother in law who had the same age went to another school and wasn't forced to change. Recently, somebody showed me an old test used by family doctors to tell witch was the dominant hand. - Give the child (or adult) a paper in front, give him 2 pens, one in the ...


1

Writing is tedious! I hate it too. I would suggest either having her write her stories in picture format (they're worth a thousand words, right?) or even comic book style. Maybe show her a few different story mediums to give her some inspiration. I'm also a big fan of getting kids typing. Being familiar with a keyboard can't hurt, and writing words is ...


1

I don't know if it is the same for kids but I know that for me (an adult) I can produce good handwriting when I want to and slow down my writing a bit. The thing is I rarely want to and here's why: Writing is a tool. Writing is not an end in of itself. The purpose that writing serves in the world is indepedent of how beautifully something is written (as ...


1

I find this question hard to answer because it is conflating several things: the ability to type/mouse/swipe enough to get stuff done official "touch typing" instruction with "home row" and all that where people type meaningless exercises like asdf the ability to make some sort of readable marks on paper such as writing down a phone number or a shopping ...


1

Speaking from personal experience, I had a lot of trouble learning to write. I found it awkward and frustrating making the tiny movements, and because the results always looked poor, I didn't enjoy it. When I was an older teenager my parents arranged for me to see a handwriting specialist. She analysed exactly which specific movements were difficult for me. ...



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