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13

At 10 months some children begin to understand the word no, but many child development theorists, parenting coaches, and other "experts" in the field of caring for and raising children recommend limiting it's use. Here is one perspective on not saying no which suggests common techniques to use instead. A major tactic to use is rephrasing. For example ...


12

You have 3 options. Explain to him, why he shouldn't do it. Try to keep it at a low level, but make him understand that it's like everybody is picking his nose. You could simply say he's not allowed, with a consequence if he's caught doing it. You could try to encourage him to stop, and let him get a price, if he doesn't pick his nose for several weeks. ...


12

I see two scenarios here. With most kids: A: And then for dessert, what do you think we should serve? B: I was thinking some-- B's child: MOM! MOM! Look! This book goes in the bucket! This is interrupting. There are lots of ways to deal with it. I liked to make physical contact - hand on arm or leg, or around waist - and eye contact and say "I'm having ...


10

A 10-month-old is limited in his understanding of "no" and I would tend to agree with you that hearing it used loudly is probably negative and hearing it often is probably confusing. You might try a softer approach - when he reaches for something he should not, say No in a gentle but firm voice, and pick him up and move him to a more appropriate spot or hand ...


9

When our kids interrupt a conversation, one of us squats down to eye level, places a hand on each side of the child's face, and says, "Is it urgent?" (If not) "Please let us finish and you will have my attention." Then we try to wind things up and get back down to eye level and listen to the child. The hands-on-the-face thing has become a bit of shorthand ...


8

Yes, this is normal and yes, in large part it will take care of itself (but you might even revisit it again when he is between ten and 13 during the pre-adolescent stage too. To improve the situation, keep doing what you are doing. Also, NEVER flush for him (unless he is going to be gone for a few more hours). If you go in to use the bathroom yourself and ...


7

At 18 months she can understand that it is not alright to throw things, but only if you're consistent. If throwing is not allowed in the house then it is not allowed in the house, no exceptions. If it is allowed in the house then you'll have to accept that you've given approval for broad categories of objects to be thrown since her categorization skills ...


7

In addition to @Balanced Mama's answer, you can also start a conversation: "I notice you often forget to flush the toilet. It really bugs me because it's gross when I have to use the bathroom. So this is not working for me. What would help you remember?" Have him brainstorm. Maybe he wants to make a 'remember to flush' sign for example. FYI, "the softer ...


7

Absolutely. What you're seeing is entirely normal in babies, particularly around 3+ months old. Among other things, he might be beginning to teethe; both of those things are associated with teething. Drooling is associated with basically everything for many babies, and sucking on fingers (or thumbs or other things) is also very normal. If the drooling is ...


7

This sounds like pretty normal 15 month old "GOOD LORD I CAN MOVE MYSELF THIS IS AWESOME", but if it's truly looking out of control, you might want to consider talking to your paediatrician, just as a check. I think we do have a few questions on hyperactivity on the site. As far as the reading goes, children generally want to mimic their parents. My ...


7

A 15 month old not only cannot read, but doesn't yet know that those black marks on the paper are words, or that what you are saying is somehow controlled by what is on the paper. This is something they need to learn, and they learn it in modern society through picture-only, no-text books. These are typically heavy cardboard so the toddler doesn't wreck them ...


6

As an adult who does the same thing, I don't think it's anything to worry about. If they aren't already involved in playing a musical instrument or some type of singing outlet you could find a local option to help them get the music out. I know in my case it's that I really love music and find myself thinking about songs I enjoy or sometimes am noodling a ...


6

Fifteen months is early even for 100% picture books. It's far too early for understanding a storyline - it's too early for the level of imagination capable of understanding that there could be such a thing as a story. Most fifteen month olds aren't interested in books except as a very short and quick interaction with daddy/mommy. They probably aren't ...


5

The American Academy of Pediatricians recommends stopping bottle useage at age 1. Many pediatricians recommend making the switch away from the bottle by 15 months. Others set the limit at 18 months. A few say the switch is not necessary until 2. The concerns with extended bottle feeding are: Children who were still bottle feeding at age 2 were more likely ...


5

Work slowly towards getting him to not pick his nose or eat his pickings. Try telling him that he may pick his nose as much as he wants, but it must be ONLY at home. Then ONLY at home and and he must throw his pickings in the garbage. Then, ONLY at home when there are no guests. Then, work towards restricting the rooms - e.g. ONLY bathroom and his bedroom. ...


5

I would just follow through more and not accept the "I'll remember next time" as an answer. "Well, clearly that's not working. So let's try something new. What would help you remember?" You could offer up some solutions, and let her pick one. Try it for a week. If it's not working, back to the drawing board. And, when she's agreed to do something, like if ...


5

My 7 year old was recently diagnosed with ADD and this was actually a question on his assessment and yes, he hums all the time! He has done this since he could talk and honestly, it drives me up the wall but according to his psychiatrist, it is a way for kids with ADD to keep themselves "busy" and they really do not even realize they are doing it.


5

First off, she probably is teething to some degree. Kids generally have at least mild teething from 9 months or so to 15 months, at a minimum. Not to say they're in pain, but chewing/gumming feels good to them, just like it does sometimes to adults who have mild tooth issues. Unless she's breaking the skin, I would let her do this. If it's not breaking ...


4

If the picking is specifically related to the nostrils feeling dry + itchy, I would recommend trying to apply Aquaphor or other moisturizer. It will both help the condition and make the idea of picking less appealing (getting sticky ointment on the picker's finger). This simple emphasis has helped break cycles of picking -> nosebleed -> scabbing -> ...


4

My immediate thought is that she is still very young - she is only just discovering her abilities, and being able to change one's surroundings gives great satisfaction. At 18 months, I would not expect her to be mentally able to understand the difference between things that are meant to be thrown and things that are not meant to be thrown. For now, you can ...


4

I encouraged this in my daughter. If the content's not inappropriate, and the kid is not interrupting about something unrelated, then why shouldn't they participate in a discussion? I found that my 4 year old had opinions pretty much as sound as other random yobbos on the issues of the day. Heck, often her more "naive" questions were the best ones to make ...


4

You would have to qualify the definition of normal to get an appropriate answer but I'll go ahead and assume you are asking based on the majority of other children. I would say this is normal. I used to hum all the time. Sometimes I would sing too, but mostly hum but then I started playing guitar. While sometimes I still hum, when I am feeling "musical" I ...


3

I heard recently about one strategy. When the child want to talk to a parent who is talking, the child places his/her hand on the parent's arm. The parent then places his/her hand on the child's to let the child know that he/she has been heard. This avoids the interruption, and validates the child's right to speak.


3

Just remember that the more you repeat "no" to your child when they're a toddler, the more they'll repeat it to you when they're 2-3-4 years old.


3

Parents who spend their days yelling "No, don't touch, be careful, it's dangerous" at their offspring and not following through are a pet peeve of mine. I try to adopt a two-pronged strategy: 1) Resist the urge to say no, even when they're doing something patently stupid and/or dangerous. They're about to chew on a shoe? Let them chew on the shoe, it's ...


2

It is good that you are bothered by this. Too many parents say stuff which then gets repeated in playgrounds. We just say "We're having a grown up conversation, which isn't for your ears." In fairness, this normally makes our child retreat to a safe distance that is still within earshot, because kids are like that. Then we opt for the only real solution, ...


2

Habits exist because they make it easier for us to cope with some situations. If you focus on eliminating the habit, coping will become more difficult. Try to focus on meeting the need that the habit is soothing. For example if a child is hair biting when she is worried, teach her to recognize her body's signs and her mind's signs that she is worried-- ...


2

Get him to do it in front of a mirror…


2

Rather than an age, I'd watch for when she can manipulate a toy well with one hand. By 'well' I mean she can control its orientation and position with enough accuracy that water/milk won't spill everywhere. Once she can do that, just give her a small cup about 1/4 filled to start with; she should get the hang of it within a few weeks. I believe that we ...


2

For our youngest we also used a reward system, as when she was 5 she would do exactly this. She was just in too much of a hurry to go and play with her siblings. So we draw a chart with her; think it ended up being a princess castle with 20 steps - and it went up on the door. Every time she remembered to flush and wash without being reminded, she would get ...



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