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23

First off, in terms of helping the child learn: Many/most schools have computer clubs. Encourage the child to inquire from other students, or ask the school professionals yourself. This will place the child with his peers developmentally, which is the biggest encouragement you can give. Talk to a computer teacher in the school if one exists. They may agree ...


22

(I'm going to focus on how to help her, rather than determining if she's gifted according to an external set of criteria.) Whether your daughter is considered "gifted" according to the person/methodology used to test this, go ahead & TREAT her as if she's gifted. In other words, do what you're doing now: spend time with her, help her find things she ...


18

I meet people at local meetups. Where I live there are about three Python meetups a month. My experiences have been great: excellent programmers who just like to talk shop. While you will likely meet others at your skill level, you won't meet people at your age level. It will mostly be older people (e.g. college age or higher), but if the goal is to talk ...


13

I'm 15, and I had this same problem about a year ago. There's an awesome community called HS Hackers on Facebook. To call it lifechanging would be a gross understatement. Hackathons are the best way to meet other talented (and often young) programmers. Hackathons are basically coding marathons. The best event to go to would be a CodeDay. It's a 24 hour ...


13

I'm not sure the difference between gifted or not is important to your actual question, which seems to be how to keep your girl learning and wanting to learn. Your primary concern, that she will be bored of school and hate going, happens even with non-gifted students. Right now, everything she learns is fun - like a game. Learning is "playing", and she ...


12

A couple of things to add to user3143's excellent answer: Tools. Tools are not a substitute for experience or knowledge, but every craftsman/woman appreciates good tools, and they are something that you as a non-programming parent can help with. Some of the best are free, but if the kid wants an IDE, library, program, etc that costs any reasonable amount of ...


11

It's most likely too early to tell. If you could tell, it would depend greatly on how she is learning the things she knows. Children's brains at that age have an extraordinary capacity for repeating things they observe, but mere remembering and repetition doesn't mean true understanding is happening. For example, if she is learning to read new words from ...


10

I was "gifted." By the second grade, I was so bored with school that my teacher thought I was learning disabled! Fortunately, my school principal was wise. She tested me, then immediately skipped me to the next grade, then a few months later transferred me to the hardest teacher (the "mean" teacher, LOL). That helped a lot (for a few years, anyway -- ...


9

I do not want to say that you are out-of-luck, but you are pretty much out-of-luck. The issue is that most people around your age do not know those languages. In fact, most people around your age likely do not even know what most of them are. If you asked most 14-year olds what Vim or LaTeX is, many of them would have no clue at all. Some might know what ...


8

Go to a hackerspace. They are everywhere in the world, and they are places where 'hackers' meet, in the sense of good-willing computer experts. It's mostly adults, but if you are lucky there are also some teens. There are plenty of projects to work on, such as programming software, 3D printers, soldering, etc. And other people can participate in your ...


7

I'm currently one year below your age, and I've been programming since I was eight years old. I currently hold knowledge in PHP, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, jQuery and Java mainly although I have little knowledge in other languages, too. Being in your position, it's not usual that you find somebody who is our age with our knowledge levels. Usually, I find ...


6

As a programmer and to some extent being 'that kid' myself I'd say that things like (cheap) embedded hardware kits such as the Raspberry Pi or Arduino are the way to go. These kits are usually quite cheap (the Pi is around $30 and is powered by a phone charger). Young programmers are not interested in getting a proper grasp of programming concepts like ...


6

Contact your local library. It is part of a library's mission to promote education, to facilitate knowledge creation, and to foster a sense of community. They run interest groups of all kinds, and if your local library is large enough, they will likely even have a tech guru of some kind on staff. If you can get a group started in the library, you have the ...


5

I was once in a similar position. I was a pre-teen who was eager to learn about programming and I was exhilarated by watching a computer execute commands as I instructed. I wasn't interested in web development, rather I was initially interested in quite the opposite: hacking/exploiting. Nonetheless, I believe my experience with learning to program will be ...


5

The widely used WAIS intelligence test has a version for children that can be taken from the age of 2 and a half; any professional psychologist should be able to administer this test. Also, if there are no special schools for gifted children in your area, try to find a school that allows bright children to skip a year. It's a simple but apparently effective ...


4

The purpose of Talented and Gifted programs is to provide extra opportunities to students with high levels of ability, talent, or potential. This is important to keep in mind, because the fact that your son was referred to as an "average student" is irrelevant to whether or not he would benefit from a TAG program. Many gifted children wind up being ...


4

Having learned software development myself in much the same way (although in the early 90s there was a lot less useful material readily available online and so I found/bought books as my primary source of info), I can say that the most important thing the kid needs he already seems to have: Motivation to learn. The other answers here offer good suggestions, ...


4

Suggest to him to develop a Tutorial / Q&A site focused on teaching other teenage programmers HTML, CSS, and JS. This would have multiple benefits: putting the already-acquired skill set to practical use learning related technologies (database management for example) learning to share one's knowledge with others (a nontrivial skill of its own) ...


4

Two caveats: I'm not a parent. I know nothing about raising kids. (But I do know about geeks.) I'm not sure if the question was aimed at meeting people your age, or any age. I'm assuming you are open to meeting and interacting with older teens and adults. Elevator Pitch Having truly productive programming skills at your age is unusual. More common is to ...


3

Never forget that there are two goals, which may sometimes conflict. Have fun programming Become a great software developer Keep those two in mind, because if you make decisions without being conscious about which of the two you are prioritizing, you may not get the right balance. Always prioritizing the same over the other won't turn out well. Somebody ...


3

If the people you are looking for don't exist, you can create them. Meaning if your child is ready and confident about it, he could lead a small group to teach others about how to program. His/her teachers could help him get the basics started to put together a group.


3

Folks have already added some great suggestions. The only thing I can add would be to find something that he already likes doing, that programming would give him a competitive advantage in. For example, if he likes video games and knowing how to code means he could mod his system or software (yes I know this could lead to cheating) to give him an ...


3

I'm the father of a 2 year old and I can't understand if she's gifted or just very bright. From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intellectual_giftedness: There is no generally agreed definition of giftedness for either children or adults, but most school placement decisions and most longitudinal studies over the course of individual lives have been ...


2

I am currently at a young age and have been programming for several years. I was first introduced into C when I was around eight, although I haven't touched the language much. I focus more on web development and design, although I have fundamental knowledge of Java for the Bukkit API and I will soon be expanding onto either Objective C or Swift. In my ...


2

Start with Scratch: http://scratch.mit.edu/ "Scratch is a free desktop and online multimedia authoring tool that can be used by students, scholars, teachers, and parents to easily create games and provide a stepping stone to the more advanced world of computer programming or even be used for a range of educational and entertainment constructivist purposes ...


2

I would like to add one point to the answers given here. If you can do so while still maintaining their interest, try to encourage studying of how the languages work (theory of computing, language paradigms, etc), maybe from reading textbooks and not just language syntax and documentation. Trial and error is great for learning what works, but understanding ...


2

This is by no means an authoritative answer - I don't really know you - I'll just offer suggestions (and a bit of opinion)... From the parent point of view Don't worry, peers will come at university or college. Finding people at the same skill level can be very difficult at this stage. First off, find the motivation, maybe the reason to find people with ...


2

Yes, there are downsides to the lack of exposure to other activities: The child may not get exposure to societal conventions or norms outside of their area of expertise. The child may not develop other skills, and thus lack options if they ever stop pursuing their current interest. Increased demands/expectations on a child that may have heightened ...


2

You may or may not consider me "gifted". I was halfway through the fourth grade curriculum when I finished first grade (I had an awesome first grade teacher who encouraged me to work ahead. My family is still friends with her 18 years later). The school wanted me to skip straight to the fourth grade, but my parents decided to keep me with my age group so I ...



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