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18

I meet people at local meetups. Where I live there are about three Python meetups a month. My experiences have been great: excellent programmers who just like to talk shop. While you will likely meet others at your skill level, you won't meet people at your age level. It will mostly be older people (e.g. college age or higher), but if the goal is to talk ...


13

I'm 15, and I had this same problem about a year ago. There's an awesome community called HS Hackers on Facebook. To call it lifechanging would be a gross understatement. Hackathons are the best way to meet other talented (and often young) programmers. Hackathons are basically coding marathons. The best event to go to would be a CodeDay. It's a 24 hour ...


10

I do not want to say that you are out-of-luck, but you are pretty much out-of-luck. The issue is that most people around your age do not know those languages. In fact, most people around your age likely do not even know what most of them are. If you asked most 14-year olds what Vim or LaTeX is, many of them would have no clue at all. Some might know what ...


8

Go to a hackerspace. They are everywhere in the world, and they are places where 'hackers' meet, in the sense of good-willing computer experts. It's mostly adults, but if you are lucky there are also some teens. There are plenty of projects to work on, such as programming software, 3D printers, soldering, etc. And other people can participate in your ...


7

I'm currently one year below your age, and I've been programming since I was eight years old. I currently hold knowledge in PHP, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, jQuery and Java mainly although I have little knowledge in other languages, too. Being in your position, it's not usual that you find somebody who is our age with our knowledge levels. Usually, I find ...


6

Contact your local library. It is part of a library's mission to promote education, to facilitate knowledge creation, and to foster a sense of community. They run interest groups of all kinds, and if your local library is large enough, they will likely even have a tech guru of some kind on staff. If you can get a group started in the library, you have the ...


6

As a programmer and to some extent being 'that kid' myself I'd say that things like (cheap) embedded hardware kits such as the Raspberry Pi or Arduino are the way to go. These kits are usually quite cheap (the Pi is around $30 and is powered by a phone charger). Young programmers are not interested in getting a proper grasp of programming concepts like ...


5

Two caveats: I'm not a parent. I know nothing about raising kids. (But I do know about geeks.) I'm not sure if the question was aimed at meeting people your age, or any age. I'm assuming you are open to meeting and interacting with older teens and adults. Elevator Pitch Having truly productive programming skills at your age is unusual. More common is to ...


4

Folks have already added some great suggestions. The only thing I can add would be to find something that he already likes doing, that programming would give him a competitive advantage in. For example, if he likes video games and knowing how to code means he could mod his system or software (yes I know this could lead to cheating) to give him an ...


4

Never forget that there are two goals, which may sometimes conflict. Have fun programming Become a great software developer Keep those two in mind, because if you make decisions without being conscious about which of the two you are prioritizing, you may not get the right balance. Always prioritizing the same over the other won't turn out well. Somebody ...


3

I would like to add one point to the answers given here. If you can do so while still maintaining their interest, try to encourage studying of how the languages work (theory of computing, language paradigms, etc), maybe from reading textbooks and not just language syntax and documentation. Trial and error is great for learning what works, but understanding ...


3

If the people you are looking for don't exist, you can create them. Meaning if your child is ready and confident about it, he could lead a small group to teach others about how to program. His/her teachers could help him get the basics started to put together a group.


3

Start with Scratch: http://scratch.mit.edu/ "Scratch is a free desktop and online multimedia authoring tool that can be used by students, scholars, teachers, and parents to easily create games and provide a stepping stone to the more advanced world of computer programming or even be used for a range of educational and entertainment constructivist purposes ...


2

Congratulations to this young mind for already having an incredibly marketable skill at the early age of 14! How cool is this kid. (Im a programmer so pardon me while he geeks out). First of call encourage this its a great skill to have! An entry level programmer can start at $30,000-50,000 a year depending on the area. Advanced programmers (usually ...


2

I am currently at a young age and have been programming for several years. I was first introduced into C when I was around eight, although I haven't touched the language much. I focus more on web development and design, although I have fundamental knowledge of Java for the Bukkit API and I will soon be expanding onto either Objective C or Swift. In my ...


2

The kid already knows how to learn and has demonstrated he wants to. Many of the other answers focus on showing the kid materials, which isn't helpful, since the kid can ask questions about materials himself anywhere on the web. Shoving materials and expectations on the kid can even be discouraging and kill of any interest in the topic. I think there's ...


2

I think, most of the suggestions here lead into the wrong direction. Given the fact that he seems to be able to obtain the relevant knowledge or skills for a project himself, I would recommend the two following: Suggest to him to give an after-school teaching class or a few talks about programming to his fellow students. The best way to learn is to teach ...


2

He needs personal projects to be interested in. Open source is great. Making a game is great - but definitely the tallest order to fill. Finishing things that have clear use, either to him or someone else, is the most flexible, self-reliable, solution. I recommend games, because I love games. But again, I love games, and games require the widest range of ...


2

This is by no means an authoritative answer - I don't really know you - I'll just offer suggestions (and a bit of opinion)... From the parent point of view Don't worry, peers will come at university or college. Finding people at the same skill level can be very difficult at this stage. First off, find the motivation, maybe the reason to find people with ...


1

In my town there is a teenage center for kids who want to learn technology. It's like an after-school meetup sort of thing, just geared towards kids instead of the usual technical meetup, which is geared towards professionals.


1

All above suggestions are useful, but if you are in the Austin or El Paso areas, you can go along to the Coderdojo there. If not and you can find some like minded kids and parents, you might consider starting one in your own area. See details at https://zen.coderdojo.com/dojo I run one in my area of Sallins, Naas (in Co Kildare. Ireland) and from 4 kids ...


1

I can't say I read all of the responses, but the first few saddened me greatly. VIRTUALLY NONE of the modern computing greats (think Gates, Jobs etc.) cut their teeth at such a high-level of abstraction (i.e. web based technologies). They all got down and dirty with the hardware. The go-to gurus in any team are almost always the ones who have the deepest ...


1

I started programming in high school with the book Game Programming for Teens. It teaches the programming language BlitzMax. I think this is a good beginner's programming language because it has english-like syntax and a simple set of commands for drawing on the screen. Many other languages like Java have a huge API which is an asset to professional ...


1

from my OWN expierience i can say that you need to just make it learn himself like i did, i started from seeing what have other people done, reading wikis, watching tutorials and trying to understand their mechanics then started trying to do it myself and here i am. i have also learned some stuff from codeacademy.com it was my foundnation for html, css, ...


1

All above suggestions are useful, but if you are in one of the areas listed below, you can go along to the Coderdojo there. If not and you can find some like minded kids and parents, you might consider starting one in your own area. See details at https://zen.coderdojo.com/dojo I run one in my area of Sallins, Naas (in Co Kildare. Ireland) and from 4 kids ...


1

If he is good at HTML CSS and JS without prompting he already has a knack for it. If he wants to sharpen his skills why not point him to CodeEval? By completing these challenges, he will get a feel for whatever language he picks up, and if he picks up multiple all the better (coding languages are like human languages after all, the more you know, the easier ...



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