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25

In a related question, a user linked this article. It might be relevant to your concerns about the social implications of home schooling. However, if your child enjoys his current school, then I would suggest simply adding in in-home supplemental education. Allow your child to pick subjects (or suggest a list of possible subjects, if you'd like), and do ...


23

First off, in terms of helping the child learn: Many/most schools have computer clubs. Encourage the child to inquire from other students, or ask the school professionals yourself. This will place the child with his peers developmentally, which is the biggest encouragement you can give. Talk to a computer teacher in the school if one exists. They may agree ...


22

(I'm going to focus on how to help her, rather than determining if she's gifted according to an external set of criteria.) Whether your daughter is considered "gifted" according to the person/methodology used to test this, go ahead & TREAT her as if she's gifted. In other words, do what you're doing now: spend time with her, help her find things she ...


19

I was a "gifted" kid growing up in a place where there wasn't much for me. I made it my mission for awhile after that to learn as much about gifted education as I could. There's only so much that traditional formal education can do for a really bright kid: traditional educational models are heavily rote, which is anathema to the active gifted mind. To ...


19

It is concerning that he said that, but it may or may not actually mean that he's depressed, let alone suicidal. It's safe to assume that your nephew is really bothered by something. How bothered isn't really clear at this point. Talk to him, but do not make a big deal about the suicide comment -- doing so could increase his tendency toward self-harm by ...


18

I meet people at local meetups. Where I live there are about three Python meetups a month. My experiences have been great: excellent programmers who just like to talk shop. While you will likely meet others at your skill level, you won't meet people at your age level. It will mostly be older people (e.g. college age or higher), but if the goal is to talk ...


14

Well, formally speaking, I'm not in a parenting role but am gifted myself (16 y/o, from Israel). Just thought I'd give some input from my experience in that age. In the third grade I was accepted into a special program for gifted children at my school, where we learned all the subjects at a quicker pace but that wasn't the great part. The great part was that ...


14

An IQ test is not something you are supposed to be able to study for. The best things you can do to prepare your child for an IQ test are to make sure that he is well-rested and comfortable during the test. Try to avoid projecting any cause for him to feel nervous about the test itself. The National Association for Gifted Children has some good ...


13

I would be more concerned about your son's potential being wasted by being bored than about how the teacher might feel if he acts up out of boredom. Fortunately, either way, the solution is the same: explore options that would allow him to be challenged or at least entertained without being disruptive. Possibilities include: Talk to the teacher and let ...


13

I'm 15, and I had this same problem about a year ago. There's an awesome community called HS Hackers on Facebook. To call it lifechanging would be a gross understatement. Hackathons are the best way to meet other talented (and often young) programmers. Hackathons are basically coding marathons. The best event to go to would be a CodeDay. It's a 24 hour ...


13

I'm not sure the difference between gifted or not is important to your actual question, which seems to be how to keep your girl learning and wanting to learn. Your primary concern, that she will be bored of school and hate going, happens even with non-gifted students. Right now, everything she learns is fun - like a game. Learning is "playing", and she ...


12

A couple of things to add to user3143's excellent answer: Tools. Tools are not a substitute for experience or knowledge, but every craftsman/woman appreciates good tools, and they are something that you as a non-programming parent can help with. Some of the best are free, but if the kid wants an IDE, library, program, etc that costs any reasonable amount of ...


11

Before school starts, have a sit down meeting with your child's prospective teacher. Bring an example of what he's already capable of for reading and writing, and explain your concerns both about him, and his possible impact on the class should he be bored to tears. See if you can't come to an agreement about finding ways to challenge him that won't disrupt ...


11

It's most likely too early to tell. If you could tell, it would depend greatly on how she is learning the things she knows. Children's brains at that age have an extraordinary capacity for repeating things they observe, but mere remembering and repetition doesn't mean true understanding is happening. For example, if she is learning to read new words from ...


10

I was "gifted." By the second grade, I was so bored with school that my teacher thought I was learning disabled! Fortunately, my school principal was wise. She tested me, then immediately skipped me to the next grade, then a few months later transferred me to the hardest teacher (the "mean" teacher, LOL). That helped a lot (for a few years, anyway -- ...


9

I do not want to say that you are out-of-luck, but you are pretty much out-of-luck. The issue is that most people around your age do not know those languages. In fact, most people around your age likely do not even know what most of them are. If you asked most 14-year olds what Vim or LaTeX is, many of them would have no clue at all. Some might know what ...


8

Go to a hackerspace. They are everywhere in the world, and they are places where 'hackers' meet, in the sense of good-willing computer experts. It's mostly adults, but if you are lucky there are also some teens. There are plenty of projects to work on, such as programming software, 3D printers, soldering, etc. And other people can participate in your ...


7

Yes, there is a relationship between being very advanced and perfectionism, especially in the first child. she is used to getting everything correct so when she doesn't it is frusterating. What I did with my child is as follows. I made mistakes (sometimes on purpose) and narrated as I corrected myself and sometimes even laughed at myself ensuring that she ...


7

Based upon justkt's response, unless your child is doing something extremely advanced as an infant, you're not going to be able to determine if your child is truly "gifted" until he is much older. According to this article on infant development from the Mayo Clinic, things like separation anxiety are an expected development anywhere from 10-12 months. ...


7

According to Raising Happiness, identifying your child as "gifted" early in life is not a recipe for success or happiness. Children who develop a growth mindset are happier and more successful than children who develop a goal oriented mindset. The issue is that children who are praised for their accomplishments rather than their effort develop fear of ...


7

Unfortunately college admission is a very confusing and opaque process which is quite different for any individual college so this is almost impossible to answer in general (assuming you are talking about college in the US). I would recommend creating a list of colleges that you are interested, go there, view the campus, and talk directly to an admissions ...


7

I asked a friend of mine who is a literacy education professor this same question. (My son just started kindergarten and tested in the middle of second grade for reading, and is moving up rapidly.) She offered this professional advice: Congratulations! What it amounts to is that your son already has strong skills for decoding text and has many strategies ...


7

I think before anything is done, you have to talk to the teacher to learn more. You need to verify that what your child is telling you is accurate. If it is, I would recommend going to the owner/operator of the daycare and asking them what their action plan is for this. At my child's daycare, there are two separate classes for each age/grade level. Perhaps ...


7

I'm currently one year below your age, and I've been programming since I was eight years old. I currently hold knowledge in PHP, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, jQuery and Java mainly although I have little knowledge in other languages, too. Being in your position, it's not usual that you find somebody who is our age with our knowledge levels. Usually, I find ...


6

Gifted is a useless term. Every child is brilliant to the parents, just as every child is beautiful to the parents. Albert Einstein was thought a slow-witted child, until he found his talent. That the child may be "gifted" is not really relevant. The highly intelligent child will not learn differently, but perhaps will learn more quickly. Provide a ...


6

Giftedness requires challenging curriculum and the diligence necessary to acquire and execute many learned skills in order to produce academic success. Giftedness includes intellectual, bodily-kinesthetic, interpersonal, and emotional intelligence as well as artistic or creative giftedness. According to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gifted intellectual ...


6

At 9 months, I believe the best thing you can do is what you would do with any child (gifted or not) and that is to encourage learning and exploration in every opportunity. If you believe the child is gifted, you might notice your child advancing faster. It would be a good idea to probably look at possible milestones for children at each month so you can ...


6

Let him explore with supervision. Having a special unlocked drawer in the kitchen (assuming the whole kitchen isn't off limits to him) filled with unbreakable things like measuring cups, spoons, a dish cloth, and cups will let him learn more about the world and what adults do. This fall, let him pick up leaves outside and crush them. He'll enjoy the sound ...



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