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31

In my experience, people see what they want to see in movies. For example, there was a brouhaha about Frozen promoting a gay agenda. If you actually examine the plots, the messages of princess movies are overwhelmingly that wealth and good looks are not enough. Snow White and the witch were both very beautiful, but one was vain and one was modest and ...


28

I agree that there may be an issue here - ie, some Disney movies perpetuate gender stereotypes, gender roles, and other things that aren't good things to perpetuate. However, I feel like this is similar to the censorship debate, in that simply not letting your kid watch them is not the right answer. Your kid will be exposed to similar issues whether or not ...


10

I found quite a few scholarly, peer reviewed articles about play and gender-stereotyped toys through my university's library. For example, I found one article about child play assessment with male, female, neutral based toys. In the content of the study, work was drawn in that noted "female" toys exhibited traits such as being attractive, creative, or ...


8

Telling him is one thing, showing him is another. He's very likely picking up this "information" from TV and other kids, but if he sees in his every day life that Mom likes the color green best, and Dad makes great bread, and his female cousin loves to play with cars and trucks, he'll figure it out. We make a point of letting our kids see us do things that ...


7

While you should definitely vet the content of movies you let your child watch, Disney movies are perhaps the least problematic in this regard. Let's look at a few Disney movies with these Princess characters. I'm going to limit it to the previous century to avoid an incredibly unweildy list problem. Snow White Here right off the bat we do have a ...


5

Ok, here are some of my thoughts: 1) I think age 7 is a pretty common age when kids (girls especially) start viewing the opposite sex as more than just a friend, and they start to realize that, eventually, those opposite-sex relationships will develop into more. I can remember that we started having "boyfriends" in second grade or so. I mean, it was ...


5

The overwhelming experience of parents is that individual children have strong preferences for certain kinds of toys, and that aside from a certain amount of overlap, these preferences tend to fall along gender stereotypes. That's not a politically correct idea, so people have spent time studying the idea, sure there must be some parental bias involved, and ...


5

This is actually fairly typical for kids around the time they start heading off to school (4 or 5 or so). Your boy might be a little early on the uptake here, but that's okay. Kids start noticing differences at this age. First gender, then race. I knew two kids in a fours classroom that had played together at preschool for two years that all of a sudden ...


4

There's a whole lot of worse things he could be doing. Like drugs. Vandalism. Getting into trouble. The things you've listed as things he enjoys are completely harmless. So let him do them as he wants, and allow him to freely continue to discover who he is. What if your son does turn out to be gay? Would you rather him feel judged and alone and ...


3

I don't think your son is stereotyping so much as he is learning to classify. He has noticed there is a difference between girls and boys, and he knows he's a boy and that his mother and some of his friends are girls, and in his mind he is trying to figure out what that means. Rather than focusing on correcting his stereotypes, or trying to correct them ...


2

Yes According to a paper published in Hormones and Behavior by Janice M. Hassett, Erin R. Siebert, and Kim Wallen (citations elided): Toy play is one of the most robust human behavioral sex differences, showing moderate to very large effect sizes. [Boys] interact more with masculine-type toys than do girls, and girls interact more with feminine-type ...


2

I like Valkyrie's answer very much: show him counter-examples. I also agree with balanced mama, that his having concrete ideas about the differences between boys and girls is developmental. I'd just add one more thing, looking at it from your son's point of view: He's noticed that girls and boys are different, and more importantly, that they are ...


1

My advice applies to every parent of a son in the free world: Your son will not grow up to be normal, but the good news is: He will grow up to be your son. Only in the non-free parts of the world do people not grow up like themselves, but according to 'the norm' - which is what 'normal' means.



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