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The earlier answers are way too complicated for a parent in the U.S. seeking practical advice. So here goes: I taught in mixed, all-girls, and all-boys high schools, and substituted in middle schools, and I can say categorically, at least at the middle and high-school level, that for the vast majority of students, the best classroom is the one with the ...


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You let her play in the creative ways that make her happy. On a side note, if you ever handed toddlers an 18" piece of foam, like a piece of a floating thing they use in a pool, the girls will immediately coddle it, like a baby, and the boys will either hit each other with them, or use them as a projectile. This is their nature. It's worse to force change ...


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Try something different. Look at what she likes and try to add engineering. She likes to decorate? Build complex decorations with her. She likes to play dolls? Build a dollhouse with her. I think it's hard to change the subject they are interested in. It all depends on their environment, TV, books, personal likes and friends.


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Children choose their toys according to what they want to learn. This is genuinely correlated with gender via factors that include social influences but also very critically the child's genes and the mother's hormone levels during pregnancy. Some children (primarily boys) prefer to play out violent conflicts. Others (primarily girls) prefer to play out ...


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Hmm, if you said you offered your daughter both boys' toys and girls' toys and let her choose, then I'd say, Okay, you are trying to be careful not to force gender stereotypes on her. But when you express concern that she rejected the boys' toys and ask what to do about this, it sounds to me like you are saying that the issue is not that you want to be ...


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I have to echo LRO's answer: Absolutely nothing whatsoever Or rather, just don't worry about it. By not worrying about boy vs. girls toys, you'll help shape her opinion that there isn't any such things. Toys are toys. Now, she may simply prefer toys that we've traditionally labeled as 'girl' toys, but that's OK. It doesn't mean you can't keep ...



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