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63

What makes a children's game a children's game is the element of chance generally greatly outweighing the element of strategy. In other words, it doesn't take much for a child to win legitimately. I recently had the exact opposite experience as yours with my five year-old son. He got a new game for Christmas where you flip over two cards to find a match. ...


24

Just anecdata: we did this with our daughter (now 4.5), mostly because playing games about math was fun for all. We thought it would make it more fun for her, and get her more involved, if she won. Now we're reaping the whirlwind; she pouts and refuses to play games when she loses. So now we're having to undo the damage we did, and teach her that playing ...


14

This raises the deeper question of: to what extent to you fabricate a phony reality for small children and until what age? If there isn't a need to protect the child from anything in the given situation, it's probably better to stick to reality. That a game can be lost is not some "harsh dose of reality" that must be revealed gradually, because the ...


9

I really like this answer and voted for it but wanted to offer up a few More ideas on the matter along the same lines. Since he is two, if he does have an evening where he is just having a frustratingly unlucky night, occasionally stacking the deck to help regain the fun, won't hurt him any. Doing it all the time does set him up with unrealistic ...


7

I don't advocate just letting your child win. However, it is entirely appropriate to adjust your level of play according to the age and abilities of the child. When playing sports against my kids, I don't let them win, but I don't go all out against them like I would against other adults my age as that wouldn't really be fun for either of us.


7

I have recommended Common Sense Media in response to a similar question about movies, and it turns out that they provide similarly high quality reviews for the following media: Movies Games Apps Websites TV Books Music They have rankings for age appropriateness, as well for rankings and explanations for specific categories that parents are likely ...


7

I just found a funny one :) i am 15 myself, so i know this one will be good :) WHO'S NEXT DOOR? If you are in a traffic queue making up stories about the people in the car nearby can be funny for a short while ie what their names are, what they do for a job, what their hobbies are, what pets they have, what their house is like etc etc. This tends to only ...


7

We play simple card games (like Uno for kids) with our 3yo, and we let the cards decide without cheating. Sometimes I win, sometimes he wins. I cheer for him when he wins (but I don't praise, that's something else). I cheer for me when I win. Regardless who wins, the victory is briefly celebrated as the end of a fun game, and then we move on: play another ...


7

Board and card games are a great activity idea. I think that 5 is old enough to be able to handle moderately complicated rules, but (more importantly) old enough to keep track of what rules apply to which game. Indeed, the variation of many new games probably helps memory and strategy skills, since she has to keep things straight! The trick is to balance ...


6

It sounds like your daughter may not have an issue with competitive play, but with being rushed about and pressed on and pushed by a bunch of other kids. Both of the games you mention tend to involve some level of pushing, shoving, and squeezing. If she isn't also having trouble with a foot race or a board game, or other competitive things, then the ...


5

Your examples sound like games for younger children. At age 15+18, I'd try to challenge them on a higher intellectual level, but in a fun way. Do you know the game 20 questions for the professor? It's a guessing game where one thinks of a person/thing/idea and the others must ask yes/no questions to zero in on the solution, and they must do it in no more ...


5

My favourite math games use cards: cribbage (adding to 15, counting to 31, matching) snap (matching) war (more than, less than) beat the calculator (one person has a calculator, the other doesn't, 2 cards are turned up; first person with the answer wins, calculator alternates between people) You can also use dice. Playing Yahtzee requires counting and ...


5

I think this is a great question. My oldest is 4 (5 this week, actually) and he's gotten to the point where winning is important to him. So we're having to deal with this situation now where he's learning to lose gracefully. It's a process. I've never intentionally let him win at games or anything, although my husband will sometimes "race" him up the ...


5

I expect that at this age your son doesn't really care about winning... and this is exactly the reason why it's a good moment to introduce losing! It could save him (and you) a lot of anguish later when he begins to care, because you (or his friends) will have to introduce losing at some point.


5

In my experience, typical parties for this kind of age group are 2 hours - I think you may find 3 hours too much. The normal format is something along the lines of: Games - 30 mins Organised entertainer (magician, puppet show, etc) if relevant - 30 mins Food - 30 mins Games - 30 mins If you're not doing an organised entertainer then extend the games a ...


5

I haven't read the book, but I would guess "clap hands" is just clapping the baby's hands or clapping your hands to the baby's hands, with or without music. I think hidey peep is when a child hides behind something or under a blanket, similar to peekaboo, but not using hands to cover eyes (search hidey peep on YouTube for a few examples). I'd think ...


4

I tend to try to balance it both ways. I have no problem with letting my kids win as long as it's not all the time. I feel like it's good for them to experience both winning and losing as it lets them realize that while they may not always win, sometimes they will and they can try hard to reach that and succeed. Whether this is the best way or not I'm not ...


4

My kids have been playing animaljam for a while now and I don't subscribe to the membership. My kids haven't complained about that. They still enjoy it. As for interaction, you can set for your child to chat freely or to choose from a list of set sentences. My daughter says you can report the person if bullying occurs. You can also choose to "ignore" that ...


4

I remember in elementary school (somewhere between grade 1-5, probably 3 for this example) we had some person from some company (or maybe government) come in and teach us division. It was very cool how she did it (well, at the time I thought so anyway). We were in a big hall. There was some 28-30 (assume 30 for this example) of us. We were asked to divide ...


4

If he gets to the point where you feel he has a good grasp of the concept of the game, start playing "for real". If he always "wins", then he won't understand that losing is just as important because it teaches how to be a good sport. Additionally, it helps you to see if he plays the game because he enjoys the game or enjoys winning. Your son is too young ...


4

Suggestions based on my experience: Drive at night. We did several similar length trips (Chicago-DC, Chicago-west of Denver) with a 2.5 year old, and the best luck we had was driving overnight. Leave at 3pm, arrive at 9am, or whatever, kids sleep 80% of the trip. They're happy, you're tired but hopefully have someone to help at the destination. If he's ...


3

Why is she having to race to a bag of toys to get "the best one?" in the first place? If she is just having this problem at parties then it really isn't a problem. She just doesn't like these kinds of games. Make sure to play OTHER less competitive types of games at her own party. she can choose to participate at other parties or not. If this is part of ...


3

A great game which can be played for hours is Contact: A word master thinks of a word and says the first letter, for example C If one of the players thinks of a word which starts with this letter , he asks a question about a word, for example, is this an animal if he thinks of a cat If second player can think of an answer which starts with the letter, he ...


3

The BBFC (British Board of Film Classification) has an extremely good reputation for rating movies, and then explaining WHY a movie is so rated. They're the ones responsible for the legal rating of British films, and their ratings are like this. U(c): Universally Acceptable but aimed for a very young audience. U: Universally Acceptable PG: Acceptable, but ...


3

Honestly, I wouldn't try to over-organize at this age. Have a few games prepped and ready to go, like the ones Vicky suggested, but I would mainly just have lots of age appropriate toys and let hem kind of just have fun. If they seem to be getting stir crazy before you are ready for next phase of party, then bust out one of your prepared games.


3

On the contrary, these games while seeming to help children learn, are on a problematic medium for them to digest them on. Hand-eye co-ordination is better learnt outside, and with three dimensional games, and eye muscles are still developing and gaining strength. ...


2

If you want to avoid TV then avoid the computer as well. Some things we did were get: Foam Blocks, big and easy to handle though at a teething stage you have to watch them Baby Book readers, LeapFrog has an infant version of stories and does both music and reading VTech has some very simple games with lights and music, kept our 1+ year old entertained ...


2

Here are links to a variety of math games that I suspect would be appropriate. http://thematicunits.theteacherscorner.net/math-games.php#activities Scroll to the Games to Create section (below the online games) for details of various math games. http://www.superteacherworksheets.com/ Select a specific math worksheet on the left and optional games ...


2

We quite like Dictionary. One person says a word, and everyone else has to guess if it is real or made up. You can ask for definitions, which can be the funniest part of the game. (This can also be played as a pencil and paper game, but that's tricky when driving.)



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