New answers tagged

4

Hopefully you have some kind of relationship, or at least an open line of communication with the friend's parents, since you let your son spend the night there. I would have a brief conversation with them about this, along the lines of: Zach had a great time at your house, thanks for letting him stay over! We did have one concern, we know he watched an ...


4

I asked him if it scared him and he answered "Not really," but I have a hard time believing this. (This is coming from a kid who's still scared of Harry Potter.) How do I talk to him about it? Looking at the preview, I'd have a hard time believing he wasn't scared by the film, either. It might be that his friend was unafraid, even laughing, which made it ...


3

Sounds like you need to take this up with the friend's family. Since your son isn't showing any adverse effects from the movie (like talking about monsters or people dying), I'd be glad that he wasn't adversely affected, but angry at the parents nonetheless. From the things you mentioned it sounds like they don't have the same standards of parenting as you ...


3

Don't be secretive about money Many parents treat money as a secret, and attempt to shield their children, and even their partners from it as though it is something dirty. Money is an important part of our lives. Be open about it. Be open about what it costs you personally in terms of time away from the family, effort and sweat to get money. Many young ...


-1

There are 3 possibilities: Your daughter's friend is a scumbag. A scumbag hijacked your daughter's friend's account. The message was faked by your daughter, in a grab for attention. Going forward, I'll assume you already looked into this possibility and ruled it out. Focusing only on the first 2 possibilities, there's a very important lesson: People lie. ...


0

Do you know if there was money involved and that the parents are soliciting money? Do not assume without the facts. I know a friend who, on April Fool's Day, faked that she lost her arm in an accident. Let's just say she ended up having to grovel to her friends who had cried their eyes out, but by doing so trust and friendship was restored. IN your case, ...


8

All the answers and comments have addressed almost every possible angle, so I wanted to focus on this: Now our daughter is devastated, and isn't trusting of new people, she doesn't even want to go out to events with us, even though we've got a holiday to Spain booked in the next few weeks. Normally she looks forward to holidays... now she's dreading it. She ...


1

This one is tricky. Let me state that I am American, and while I don't see what that has to do with anything, out side of the legal stuff, it seems important to you, so, take that into consideration. It's hard to tell where to start. I would start by explaining to my child that these things happen. That not all people are good, and that not all people ...


3

Things to learn for your daughter: If her best friend says she has cancer, be happy if you find out she is lying, because it's better than if she had said the truth. Any news that you hear, don't react rashly, take your time to find out what really happened, and why it happened, and react to it properly when you have thought about it. It's Ok to lock ...


11

Assuming everything you've been told is true, it's an example of a "cancer fraud" scam. It's a crime and it's more common than most people realise. Like all alleged crimes, it's the job of the police to establish if it's true. They can do things you can't, like check actual hospital records. If it turns out it was a malicious prank (maybe someone hacked ...


24

Angela got message from her friend via Facebook with "Ha, Ha, I've scammed you." Who guarantees to you that the message is true and the cancer was all made up? Calm down. What do (did) you think about them? What do (did) Angela think about them? Who will profit from such message? If the cancer was faked; why confess when there is no doubt against you? If ...


130

I'm from the UK too. Call the parents and check the message was actually sent by them, it seems rather stupid that they would volunteer that information for no reason. I have had my Facebook hacked around four times usually by friends but once by a complete idiot who messaged all my family and friends some mean stuff. If she has admitted it and you know it ...


32

Give it time; time helps a lot. It's only been a few days, and this is quite a shock, especially to your daughter who probably worried for her friend's health/life. She's experienced a profound betrayal. It will be deeply disturbing for a while, but the intensity will fade with time. Whatever else this is, it's also an opportunity to talk to your daughter ...


3

Welcome to se. There are many possibilities behind the scene.. Lauren might have a different reason behind this, it being a legit or not is totally based on her ethics, and if course Angela shouldn't get ideas that it's ok to do this. Misunderstanding between friends happen all the time, communication would solve 80% and the other 20% might not be worth ...



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