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16

Disclaimer .. IANAL, and A needs a lawyer. I don't think there are inherent legal rights conferred by being a "god-parent". However ... the real answer is it depends who is contesting. If no one contests, the court will award A custody. It will initially temporary, and she will need to petition for adoption after all is settled. Relevant Issues: ...


10

New Jersey has a Safe Haven Law (as do most states), which allows you to give your baby anonymously to any hospital emergency room or police station within 30 days of birth. You do not even have to take the baby yourself, you can ask a friend, member of the clergy, practically anyone. The baby will be placed in foster or pre-adoptive care. Adoption ...


6

Adding to tomjedrz... Things to consider: Who currently has physical custody of the children? If it is A, make it official with the authorities, such as a family court or child protective services. If not we will need more information. What sort of documents are available to assert B's intentions? Find letters, emails, baptismal records, power of attorney ...


6

Don't worry about it. That's a really common behavior with foster kids. Here are a few of the many reasons why: Foster kids aren't always sure where they stand with foster families. He may simply have thought it would be taking too much liberty to call you his "real" family. Some foster kids still hold out hope of their birth parents showing up able and ...


6

I was one of two biological children to parents who, over the years, took in at least 100 emergency placement kids. There are different kinds of kids one encounters and they will each have their own level of impact on the whole family: Some of the kids really only needed a bed to sleep in overnight - these were often run-aways that had managed to get ...


4

In our state, the license is the same. We started fostering with the intention to adopt, but once we were licensed, the social workers asked us to take some temporary placements, and we agreed for a year. We stopped after we adopted our son. The main negative was the exposure to bad habits. Our biological daughter started hitting others after we fostered ...


4

I wouldn't rush into anything based on your fear. Parents are almost hardcoded to love their children, so you may feel differently after the birth. If you don't change your feelings maybe someone in your family would be prepared to look after the baby, e.g. grand parents. Would the baby's father be interested in looking after it ?


4

The first reason not to ask the child is because they probably don't know the real reason. From their point of view, the answer is most likely something like, "Because the policeman won't let me live with my mom anymore." They are often confused because they get different stories from their family than from the social worker. Kids don't always get ...


3

On the first point, unfortunately there isn't a good way to soften the blow ahead of time. Children that age live day to day. You can tell your daughter it's probably temporary, but it won't really hit her until it actually happens. What they told us in our class is that it's better to try to form an attachment even knowing you'll lose it, than to be ...


3

I have two different sets of friends who are currently going through the foster parenting approval process via two different methods. Both groups emphasize that foster parents should not probe the child with questions about their history, but simply listen if the child talks about it on his/her own. Most US states will happily give you the background of ...


2

I think it sounds a bit insensitive if it was asked that plainly, and I can imagine it would be a sore subject with most foster children, so I'm with the mother on this one. That being said if I was going to be a foster parent I'd want to know what happened to the child as the more I know the better I'd be able to help. The foster agency should be the ones ...


2

In my opinion, it is wrong to ask the child himself/herself until they reach proper age. The child should always feel welcome, wanted and protected. Being moved to a foster family usually means his former family did not give him any of those, and the last thing he/she needs is to be reminded of that or even worse having to explain. If the one adapting the ...



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