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15

Your body will (except in very rare cases) produce as much milk as your baby needs. There are several ways of messing with this supply and demand system, though, and one of them is by supplementing with formula. You see, once feeding has been established, your breast will produce as much milk as you empty out of it(empty is not really the right word here, as ...


12

You should be nursing 10-12 times per day in order to make sure your body produces enough milk (the more you nurse, the more it produces) and also to prevent engorgement. Aim for feeding about every 2 hours during the day and every 4 hours at night. You will know if she is taking enough in by how much is coming out the other end. By day 9, a newborn should ...


3

It is almost certain they do not need this bacteria. Have a look at this question on Skeptics. the European Food Safety authority has researched 800 health claims of such companies, and they could not find relationships. There is some evidence that probiotics can help in certain situations, for a small subset of the population, but that is about it. ...


3

The normal advice for formula is that you should not re-use a bottle that has been partially used, in line with the advice given above. The advice for breastmilk is different (breastmilk naturally has antimicrobial properties) so it is generally considered OK to re-use a bottle of breastmilk. It can be stored at room temperature for up to an hour and in the ...


3

According to the USDA: Storing Infant Formula Store bottles of prepared infant formula in a properly functioning refrigerator until ready to use. Bacterial growth is reduced when infant formula is kept in a refrigerator at temperatures at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or below. (Use a special thermometer to test if the refrigerator is at the ...


3

According to the World Health Organization guidelines: Discard any feed that has not been consumed within two hours from preparation (unless refrigerated). Prepared feeds can be held in the refrigerator (≤5 °C) for up to 24 hours. Discard all leftover feed. Preferably, the hang-time for continuous or bolus feeds should be no more than two hours at room ...


2

It is possible to know how much milk your child is getting: Weigh her on a sufficiently-precise scale, feed her, and then weigh her again. The difference between the two weights is the amount of milk she received. Each 0.063 lbs difference equals 1 oz of milk consumed. (In practice, an accurate measurement can be difficult due to squirminess. You might ...


2

Here's the problem. Your doctor has recommended a particular solution. Anything we recommend would be a second opinion against their recommendation, and taking our advice over a doctor's would be... not good. The best thing to do is to overcome the fussiness. Either mix something you know your child likes into the mash, or instead of egg-yolks, make an ...


2

For us, the only way we could wean our first son (and will soon with our second!) is to stop doing middle of the night feedings. Our 10 month old is mostly weaned off of them, but still sometimes will wake up and ask for some; how we got even this far was simply to stop feeding and rock him to bed. That led to a couple of rough nights, but it doesn't take ...


1

Thanks for the clarifications... Well, first of all, a newborn, at this age, should be getting more or less 60ml each time, on average. Some babies will take more, some less, it'll depend a lot on her weight when she was born, etc. Producing milk is something not so consistent among mothers. My wife just produce enough milk after 5 days, some of my friends ...



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