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5

Noah & woliveirajr are both correct that there is some risk of reducing nutritional value, I'm sure. I will offer as counter point my home study (sample size=2) of children who were bottle-fed formula almost exclusively as infants; formula which was on occasion reheated in the microwave. They are now 12 and 9, healthy, and not malnourished. They ...


5

Depending on the formula that you're using, they might have some probiotics in their composition. For example, Nestlé. Probiotics have small tolerance to high temperatures, so preparing the formula (or heating it after it was prepared) above some temperature might kill those probiotics, reducing the nutritional value of the formula. For example, this ...


3

It is almost certain they do not need this bacteria. Have a look at this question on Skeptics. the European Food Safety authority has researched 800 health claims of such companies, and they could not find relationships. There is some evidence that probiotics can help in certain situations, for a small subset of the population, but that is about it. ...


3

The normal advice for formula is that you should not re-use a bottle that has been partially used, in line with the advice given above. The advice for breastmilk is different (breastmilk naturally has antimicrobial properties) so it is generally considered OK to re-use a bottle of breastmilk. It can be stored at room temperature for up to an hour and in the ...


3

It's certainly not illegal, it's just ill-advised. When it comes to your child's safety, is it really worth taking the risk? I believe a better statement would be "During the heating or feeding process, no single part of the bottle or food should ever be hotter than what you would give to your infant". Swirling the formula around to distribute the heat is ...


2

Here's the problem. Your doctor has recommended a particular solution. Anything we recommend would be a second opinion against their recommendation, and taking our advice over a doctor's would be... not good. The best thing to do is to overcome the fussiness. Either mix something you know your child likes into the mash, or instead of egg-yolks, make an ...


2

For us, the only way we could wean our first son (and will soon with our second!) is to stop doing middle of the night feedings. Our 10 month old is mostly weaned off of them, but still sometimes will wake up and ask for some; how we got even this far was simply to stop feeding and rock him to bed. That led to a couple of rough nights, but it doesn't take ...



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