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16

Your body will (except in very rare cases) produce as much milk as your baby needs. There are several ways of messing with this supply and demand system, though, and one of them is by supplementing with formula. You see, once feeding has been established, your breast will produce as much milk as you empty out of it(empty is not really the right word here, as ...


13

You should be nursing 10-12 times per day in order to make sure your body produces enough milk (the more you nurse, the more it produces) and also to prevent engorgement. Aim for feeding about every 2 hours during the day and every 4 hours at night. You will know if she is taking enough in by how much is coming out the other end. By day 9, a newborn should ...


7

My wife researched the various formulas available using the internet, and we asked several pediatricians, and formula choice really comes down to price and preference. There are international standards that govern the nutritional value of infant formulas, so the reality is that there is not much of a difference between brands, as far as nutrition goes. ...


6

In most cases, breast milk or formula provides just about everything a baby needs for the first four to six months. The exception is vitamin D, which is recommended as a supplement for breastfed babies and babies who drink less than 32 ounces of formula per day per The Baby Center.


6

My wife mixed breast milk in with the formula for awhile, eventually increasing the formula until it was all the baby was used to. At some points she had issues and also had a small bottle of all breast milk, so when the baby refused the formula she would start one bottle then switch. Our kids mostly refused formula, and my oldest wouldn't take the bottle ...


5

You may want to explore the following: Neocate, Elecare, Nutramigen, Nestle Good Start, Alimentum, and goat's milk. I have seen children who have been on several of these by physician's order due to various health/feeding issues. Most are formulated to promote digestion, reduce reflux, and prevent allergic reactions. Most are pricey. Some children appear ...


5

Depending on the formula that you're using, they might have some probiotics in their composition. For example, Nestlé. Probiotics have small tolerance to high temperatures, so preparing the formula (or heating it after it was prepared) above some temperature might kill those probiotics, reducing the nutritional value of the formula. For example, this ...


5

So long as it's only powder and not made up then that's fine. I can say that pretty confidently as when it is manufactured it is turned from a liquid product into powder using a process called spray drying and that even a 'cool' process will be quite a bit hotter than 40 deg! For a walkthrough of the facilities used to produce infant formula, GEA Process ...


4

We eliminated the evening nursing/bottle by gradually giving solid foods shortly before bedtime in its place and reducing the amount of fluid. I don't think you'll be able to stop the bottle 'cold turkey' without replacing it with some solids, or you'll have a toddler waking in the middle of the night from hunger.


4

My baby wasn't fussy but my wife was. Result, we went through 5 changes of milk in the first 3 months. My wife, naturally wanted the best for out baby. As we live in China, she was worried about the safety of domestic milk brands. We started out with a Dutch brand and she bought two bottles then I pointed out that the milk was form Indonesia and bottled in ...


4

It's certainly not illegal, it's just ill-advised. When it comes to your child's safety, is it really worth taking the risk? I believe a better statement would be "During the heating or feeding process, no single part of the bottle or food should ever be hotter than what you would give to your infant". Swirling the formula around to distribute the heat is ...


4

Noah & woliveirajr are both correct that there is some risk of reducing nutritional value, I'm sure. I will offer as counter point my home study (sample size=2) of children who were bottle-fed formula almost exclusively as infants; formula which was on occasion reheated in the microwave. They are now 12 and 9, healthy, and not malnourished. They ...


3

I'll start off by saying this answer isn't complete, and addresses breastmilk rather than formula. Most breastfeeding advocates are reluctant to say that breastfed babies need any additional supplements, claiming that breastmilk was designed to be the only thing a baby ate, and that if babies needed more of a certain vitamin, then breastmilk would have more ...


3

According to the World Health Organization guidelines: Discard any feed that has not been consumed within two hours from preparation (unless refrigerated). Prepared feeds can be held in the refrigerator (≤5 °C) for up to 24 hours. Discard all leftover feed. Preferably, the hang-time for continuous or bolus feeds should be no more than two hours at room ...


3

According to the USDA: Storing Infant Formula Store bottles of prepared infant formula in a properly functioning refrigerator until ready to use. Bacterial growth is reduced when infant formula is kept in a refrigerator at temperatures at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or below. (Use a special thermometer to test if the refrigerator is at the ...


3

The normal advice for formula is that you should not re-use a bottle that has been partially used, in line with the advice given above. The advice for breastmilk is different (breastmilk naturally has antimicrobial properties) so it is generally considered OK to re-use a bottle of breastmilk. It can be stored at room temperature for up to an hour and in the ...


3

It is almost certain they do not need this bacteria. Have a look at this question on Skeptics. the European Food Safety authority has researched 800 health claims of such companies, and they could not find relationships. There is some evidence that probiotics can help in certain situations, for a small subset of the population, but that is about it. ...


2

We bought a miniature crock pot that we leave plugged in and full if water. It's hot enough to heat a bottle quickly when immersed, but won't overheat the milk unless it's left in there a really long time. Once I take it out I give the bottle a quick shake or a few swirls to evenly distribute the temperature. It can take a while for hot water to come from ...


2

Try a rechargable hot-pack. They have a metal disk that you click to activate the heat. Then you recharge them by boiling the pack in water. Simple and portable.


2

Never heat the milk in the microwave, even in a separate container. This can create hot spots that can scald the baby. We always use your first method but we just use hot tap water. Remember, it just needs to be slightly warmer then body temp.


2

We always just set the bottle in a saucepan over low heat. You can overheat it if you aren't paying attention, but after a while it becomes a habit and you don't have to think as much about it.


2

You should not be attempting to make formula. It is extremely complex and would not provide the nourishment the child needs. Soy in large quantities is certainly not good for an infant; or anyone for that matter. Low dosages per the soy based formula should not harm the child. The only option I'm aware of which avoids both soy and dairy is the Similac ...


2

We had a really hard time getting our daughter off of the evening bottle, it got to the point that she would not go to sleep without it and she was rapidly approaching five years old. Thinking about it, we both knew that it wasn't really about the milk, it was more about the feeling of security she got from two places: Suckling Routine Suckling was ...


2

One way is to convince the kid that he/she is just getting too old. You can do this by making some sort of symbolic act to notify this. Works with pacifiers too. In Stockholm people go to the petting zoo and stick the pacifier onto the fence at the to "give it to the small animals" who need it better. Another way is to telling the kid that he/she is too ...


2

You could consider changing your routine a bit. If your baby is 6 months old, it's a good time to start introducing solids (if you haven't already). Instead of giving her a bottle in the morning, you could give her rice cereal with formula mixed in.


2

Interesting that she was happy with it for about 2 weeks. Are you sure or have you checked if it has caused any irritation to the stomach? If everything is OK, what if you try to slowly introduce the formula with expressed milk, for example half expressed milk and half formula and decrease the expressed milk while increasing the formula until she ...


2

Some answers or comments on this site indicate that due to strict minimum nutrition standards, formulas are all basically the same. The only thing I could possibly come up with is taste, but I guess as long as your infant accepts it and doesn't turn purple, I'd say you're not crazy and any formula goes :)


2

Despite what manufacturers would have you believe, most/all formula is essentially the same. At least here in the US, all baby formula must meet a certain set of criteria involving the nutrients, vitamins, and minerals found in the formula. Having said that, constipation is a very individual thing. Different babies will respond to different formulas ...


2

I can't answer your question specifically, but I would disregard any advice that tells you to choose a low-iron formula. I found a blog post that includes links to some studies. The idea is that iron supplementation is constipating, and it may be, but infants need iron to avoid anemia. Iron from supplements is not absorbed as well by the body as it is from ...


2

If your wife is the one trying to give the formula, your daughter might refuse it because she can smell her mother's milk. You might have to be the one to give the formula and your wife might have to leave the room. Otherwise, dropper or a small (plastic) shotglass (It's how I gave my son expressed milk when we were having latching issues) should do until ...



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