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15

As a matter of fact, there is. Use a pair of scissors. If you take a large pair of scissors, you'll be able to cut it as fine as possible. And this method isn't limited to just bread, either.


14

I currently live in Japan. Needless to say, tea is extremely popular. Infants (9 months+) are sometimes given a certain type of tea called 麦茶, otherwise known as roasted barley tea. It is a caffeine free tea so it didn't make her jittery or keep her up and also has a few health benefits in the realm of bacterial resistance. This is the only tea we have given ...


9

I did "open face" sandwiches - one piece of bread with something spread on it - and cut them into "sticks". They can pick up the stick and bite off a piece. I probably cut 4 or 5 sticks from each slice of bread (just like "soldiers" for eggs.) It's easier to cut them when it's open face, because you're not squeezing out the filling as you cut through the top ...


9

Freeze it first... then cut it up. By the time you are done, it will probably be thawed out for eating!


8

Use a chopping board. Use a bread knife - these have scalloped serrations. Place the sandwich on the chopping board. Place the knife, blade edge down, on the sandwich. Place one hand over the blade back and the sandwich, thus holding the sandwich safely. Or place the blade on the sandwich and place your other hand on the sandwich next to the knife - ...


8

I would not give caffeinated tea (true tea) to an infant. Separate from the iron absorption issues (and it's not just iron; caffeine has a lot of negative effects on mineral and vitamin levels), the effect on mood is also significantly relevant to children. That said, if she is breastfed, and Mom's having any caffeine, then so is she. Small amounts ...


7

I'm not sure that I'm qualified to be answering -- it's been over a decade since my child was that age -- but, for what it's worth, I'm going to give my 2¢. If a child is waking b/c they are hungry, then that is the only thing which will comfort them. If the child is waking for any other reason -- dirty diaper, bad dream, etc -- then curing that issue ...


7

No, their diet is not reasonable. They are building bodies so need a significant amount of protein, calcium, iron, and vitamins (that's before you even look at trace minerals, omega group of fatty oils and such). Even though our children eat almost everything (and lots of it), a blood test showed our son was short on iron and vitamin D. It is critical for ...


7

Infants do not have strong immune systems. A quick perusal of an academic database yielded three articles within the first 10 hits that caused concern (search terms tea infants): Stojanović, M. M., Katić, V., & Kuzmanović, J. (2011). Isolation of Cronobacter sakazakii from different herbal teas. Vojnosanitetski Pregled: Military Medical & ...


5

Have you seen those silicone squeeze pouches for infant feeding? They are sized for baby hands and you can fill them with soft foods like applesauce or other purees or yogurt. They're basically a reusable alternative to the disposable squeeze pouches you can get at the grocery store and I like that you can fill it with homemade food and control the amount of ...


5

You don't really know, but you can make some educated guesses. Is your daughter eating a reasonable amount during the day? Does how much she eats during the day affect how often she wakes up? Keep track for a few days, and try varying it a bit. If you find a maximum - ie, an amount either that she's unwilling to eat more than, or that doesn't have any ...


5

Children accept or reject foods based on different reasons than adults do. Often the exact same food (to you) will be accepted if you change some trivial aspect of it. Some tips: texture really matters. Many kids reject meat for texture reasons. There's a reason why burgers are such a popular kid food. Burgers, meatballs, meatloaf, sausages, any time the ...


5

It seems, from what you listed that you are currently doing, that you have all your bases covered. She's at the age where you can somewhat appeal to her logically (i.e. the tomatoes), she has been appealed to by other's good experiences with the food (her brother), she has met you halfway on trying them outside of being cooked into something (the sandwich), ...


4

There are certain kinds of baker's goods that can be cut into small enough slices (or even pieces) with a sharp knife - like baguettes or various breadrolls. For example the breadroll below - don't cut it exactly in half, cut it into small slices and you will have several sandwiches with sizes perfectly matching the size of your kid's hands and mouth. ,


4

Obviously your wife's health is paramount and giving her things that she is allergic to is a bad idea. Equally, I'm sure the advice to avoid (or severely limit) alcohol intake and not to smoke during pregnancy should be well publicised enough to be taken as read, but just in case. The NHS (UK National Health Service) publishes a lot of advice online now ...


4

Flights are a brief disruption to routine, so you can and should adjust your routines to accommodate them as well. In other words, if baby can't eat soft and juicy things cleanly yet, then either serve only non-soft/juicy foods he can eat well, or feed him with a spoon. Skipping one day of "learning how to eat" won't do any harm. And oh, some unsolicited ...


4

I would suggest that, at the age of the child that jam sandwiches are appropriate, cutting into truly small pieces is not necessary for most breads. I gave my then-7 month old long strips of basic store bought sandwich bread (wheat, but not crunchy-wheat), perhaps 1-2cm wide by 8cm long or so, and he dealt with it fine. Younger than that I probably ...


4

I used to boil a week's worth of various fruits and vegetables (no added salt), puree them individually, set a bit aside for the weekend, pour them in ice cube trays and put them in the freezer. Then we'd take them out as needed every weekday morning and add some oil, put it in a jar to defrost by lunchtime at daycare where they'd warm it up and feed it to ...


4

Could it be a sensory processing issue? You've tried every single thing I've ever heard of for picky eaters (former picky eater here and mother to one that refuses to eat anything not processed within an inch of its life) and you're not seeing any results. Maybe it's time to bring in an occupational therapist that specializes in pediatric issues; they're ...


4

In my experience, spicy food is something that one can build up a tolerance to. Eat one raw clove of garlic, and it's going to be overwhelming. Eat them once a day, and within a few days, it doesn't seem nearly so strong (and yes, I've tried it; I used to use it as a means of discouraging mosquitos from biting me while spending long periods outdoors... I'm ...


3

Ellyn Satter's Division of Responsibility in Feeding is extraordinarily helpful here. For toddlers through adolescents it is: The parent is responsible for what, when, where The child is responsible for how much and whether Parents' feeding jobs: Choose and prepare the food Provide regular meals and snacks Make eating times ...


3

A lot of people recommend cold carrots, but the problem with carrots is that the baby can break a piece off that is just the right size to choke him. If you try carrots, you should watch carefully, and preferably only allow him to gnaw on the fat end where he is only likely to get scrapings rather than chunks. It is difficult to come up with a "natural" ...


3

Traditionally you avoid "rewarding" children for trying new foods. Thus, you don't say "have three spoons of broccoli and then you can have pudding" because that creates bad incentives and teaches the child that the food is yucky. But there's an interesting new approach where you ask the child to try a tiny bit, and reward them with a sticker. Soon, ...


3

We had this problem mostly with meats but also for other foods as well. We found the following works well (suggested by occupational therapist): First stage: Kiss the new food. That's all... no pressure to even put in mouth. Do it for a few meals. Second stage: "Rocket it" - put in mouth and immediately spit out into napkin or trashcan. Make it fun- ...


3

For our guy, he had always been given a taste of our desserts, but when he got to the point of refusing everything unless it was a dessert (around the same age), we stopped the desserts cold turkey. He was not happy about it and there were a few days with him crying, pouting, screaming, etc. No matter what, we didn't give in, although we know it would have ...


3

Pizza cutter. It's also great for pancakes.


3

I never had any success pre-mixing cereal for my kids. They usually hated the consistency when it was anything other than fresh. Honestly, if you are just using water and applesauce, it seems like just bringing the dry cereal + a pouch of applesauce+ a bottle of water and mixing it in an empty cup (which you should have no trouble procuring on the plane) ...


3

I am sure that some will not like what I have to say, they seem to prefer to have problems, rather than to accept they are just another person, but in any case I feel compelled to share my experience as a father of five. We had/have a picky eater and spoke to our pediatrician at around this same age, perhaps a bit earlier. His advice was that when the ...


3

Children are like any other person, and we all have food likes and dislikes. Furthermore, their sense of taste and preferences change rapidly over time. My daughter went through a number of years where she didn't like tomatoes or tomato sauce or similar. She had liked it fine before, but for a while she wouldn't even eat ketchup on fries. All she could ...


2

My toddler isn't too fond of eggs either. One thing we do for him is make french toast since toast is often served when we have eggs for breakfast it really isn't that much extra work to make. Another thing we do is finely scramble them and add them to his oatmeal. It sounds weird but you can't taste it at all and the texture is very similar to the oats. ...



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