Hot answers tagged

37

Honey is not recommended at all for babies under one year of age because of the risk of infant botulism. The risk isn't big, but if it happens, it can be life-threatening. Avoiding honey until the child is older is an easy way to prevent this. To protect your baby from infant botulism: Don't offer honey. Wild honey is a potential source of C. ...


27

Botulism spores are one of the very few things that can survive in honey, and even then, they can only do it by becoming totally inactive. In an adult, stomach acid will destroy those spores, and normal gut microbes will eliminate any that survive to reach the small intestine An infant's stomach isn't acidic enough to do the job, and their intestinal ...


10

We've got two working adults and three kids — we're very familiar with the scheduling challenges this causes. (Once your daughter starts having extracurricular activities, things will only get more hectic!) First off, if you want the whole family to be eating the same meal at the same time, a snack on the way home for your daughter is pretty critical to ...


9

Some nutritionists advise against a strict vegan diet, particularly for very young children, as it can be difficult to meet their nutritional requirements. http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2010/apr/20/veganism-safe-children https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/healthyliving/vegetarian-diets-and-children As a parent your primary responsibility ...


8

You answer your own question in the prohibitions you put on the acceptable answers. If someone is doing something that you don't like there are only a few solution. Ask them to stop Do it yourself (cook for yourself or move out) Accept it There aren't really any other choices. What you need to do is work on #1 more. The only way to resolve an issue it ...


7

I have a slightly Zen answer to this, which is that you shouldn't say an absolute "no" to sweets. Limit the amounts, by all means, only to specific occasions if possible. But do not categorically say no. The problem with making something forbidden is that it makes it much more desirable, especially to children but also to adults. There is a type of snack ...


5

Just my personal opinion, but: I think this is a choice you should leave up to your children. Whether or not a vegetarian or vegan diet is good, advisable or even ethically required is very much in debate, with good arguments for both sides. From a medical point of view, I think the general consensus is that vegetarian is ok for children, if it is ...


5

You've tried already to ask and your parents have said that they are willing to accommodate you, but they continue to salt according to their taste. I have two suggestions. Be specific about the amount of salt. So instead of "can you use less salt?", try something more like "can you use half the amount of salt that the recipe calls for?" Because maybe they ...


4

Use sunbutter or wowbutter and jelly. They are peanut butter substitutes that are supposed to taste exactly like peanut butter, but are both 100% peanut free! I have a peanut allergy and I eat it all the time.


4

How about giving her a small amount of food that doesn't need preperation as soon as she gets home? Enough food for her to be less hungry, but not that much that she's really full? That way you or your husband can prepare the main dish as soon as you're home, and she can eat with you? Or ask the daycare if it is possible to give her some fruit between 4:00-...


4

Meat, in and of itself, isn't something that you must eat any particular amount of. Many people are quite successful vegetarians and vegans, even as children, and on the other side of things, well, many children have meat-centric meals at least as much as you describe with no ill effects. The important consideration is the diet as a whole, and what effect ...


4

For the first year, infants should have no more than 0.4g of sodium (1g of salt) per day. Odds are they will get most of that through naturally occurring salts. More than this can be dangerous for your baby's kidneys. After one year old, you can start adding small amounts of salt to foods, though it's probably not necessary in most cases. Especially if ...


4

I am not a doctor, and this forum is not a substitute for getting medical advice. If you think your daughter has a medical problem, you should seek care from a competent medical provider. That said, has anybody mentioned Prader-Willi syndrome to you? It is a genetic disorder that results in a person always being hungry. Characteristic of PWS is "low muscle ...


3

The recommendations on how much of a particular food group should be included in a healthy diet give amounts per day, and aren't so concerned about which meals each item is included in. Depending on which set of guidelines you look at, a seven year old girl should be getting 3-5 ounces of lean proteins a day. Here are a couple of links to charts that break ...


3

While most two-year-olds should not be waking because of hunger in the middle of the night, every person's metabolism is different. That said, do you have reason to suspect his is higher than most? Does he run around more than his peers, does he eat more, is he thinner, or is he growing faster? Otherwise he just may have gotten into the habit of getting ...


3

There are a few possible causes. It may be that your son likes the taste or texture of dinner, even though he is not hungry, and therefore he chews on the food but isn't really motivated to swallow. It may be a control issue: he's essentially saying I don't have to swallow and you can't make me, and that grin definitely points (at least in part) to him ...


3

In addition to Erica's detailed and excellent answer, a few notes for how we handle this (in a similar situation). Most of our meals are planned around our schedules. We have nights that one of us is home a bit earlier, and nights one of us will be home later (or both). On nights that we can be home a bit earlier, we plan dinners that might take a bit of ...


3

No, toddlers should not (regularly) drink milk or formula during the night. The major reason for this is tooth decay. Toddlers have a fairly full set of teeth, and formula in particular has a lot of plain old sugar in it. Putting them to bed with a bottle, or even feeding them immediately before they sleep for 4-6 hours, is bad for their teeth, and can ...


3

It sounds like your son has developed quite a bad habit there. Eating in front of the television is not good, so I think you'll want to nip this habit in the bud straight away. It might seem harsh, but I really think you should simply wait it out. Don't turn on the TV, no matter what. He'll eat when he gets hungry enough. Don't make a big fuss, and don't ...


3

You're asking your parents to do something quite easy in theory, yet very difficult in practice: To cook the food in a way that tastes wrong to them. As you've discovered, salt and the enhanced flavors it gives are habit-forming. To your parents, "unsalted" food tastes bland and bad, simply because it doesn't meet their expectations of the flavors. When ...


2

It sounds like you are basically doing exactly the right thing at mealtimes. I'd support everything said in the answer by 'A E'. I think your strategy of not reacting sounds perfect. I add a bit more detail on what has worked very well for us, mixed with the standard wisdom, in What to do about a 4 year old that's unbelievably picky about food . I would ...


2

While looking into stimulants, I found out oranges do contain Synephrine, an alkaloid, occurring naturally in some plants and animals. According to wikipedia's page on synephrine: p-synephrine (or formerly Sympatol and oxedrine [BAN]) and m-synephrine are known for their longer acting adrenergic effects compared to norepinephrine. Its molecular ...


2

It is totally reasonable to expect him to do a full night. Our 2.5 girl has been doing full nights since she was 4 months or so, and here (Belgium, but France too for what I know) it is considered usual for a kid to sleep all night before he is 1. I know it's quite different in the USA for example, and anyway all kids don't follow the same pattern... but I ...


2

I read this article and it explains well about the baby food in the first year. Baby Food Stage 1: Birth to 4 months What to feed: Only food for infants is breast milk or infant formula to meet all their nutritional needs. Recommended milk is breast milk only. You should start giving formula or any other substitute in case breast milk supply ...


2

I don't know if the behavior is "normal", but it's certainly something I've heard of before (though not something my kids have done). It's probably largely what you say - a small rebellion. Children around two are learning that they have some control over things, and they like seeing what that entails. One of the things he has control over is eating - ...


2

It's difficult even for teenagers and adults to understand and acknowledge the fact that too much sweets are bad for one's health (and weight). At 2yo you can try explaining - you will or will not succed in that. But the most important thing is to limit the amount of sweets to an absolute minumum (ie. special occasions like family visits or birthdays). It'...


2

Coconut is not really a nut, though the FDA now classifies it as a "tree nut". It is not cross-reactive with nut allergies in general; see for example this page discussing nut allergies. Coconut is not a botanical nut; it is classified as a fruit, even though the Food and Drug Administration recognizes coconut as a tree nut. While allergic reactions to ...


2

I believe the "why" is best explained by experience and example. And that example should be you and your husband. At 2 years old, your daughter doesn't have the attention span to listen to all the research on why sugar is bad for you. And even if she did, she doesn't have the foresight at that age to realize that healthy habits now lead to a healthy body, ...


2

Firstly, if you're going to a specialist clinic I would assume that they are going to give far better and tailored advice that "the internet" will be able to, especially from the few details you give in the question. I think the main problem might be that he (very understandably) prefers breastfeeding to solid food! Now, obviously you cannot control your ...


1

I'm assuming that her growth (size & weight) are normal for her age. If that's not the case, please go and contact your doctor / go to the hospital! What you see is a normal reflex (assuming the above) and that's nothing to worry about. New food has a different taste than milk and that takes time to get used to. With regards to the practical side of ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible