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51

This is what my mother did with us (it wouldn't work with very young children; I can't recall what she did then): We were never served food. It came to the table in whatever pot it was cooked in, and placed on a block of wood (to avoid burning the table). We then served ourselves out of that pot (or those pots, pans, whatever, depending on what the food ...


49

Advantages.... None Disadvantages... It creates unnecessary conflict with the child, and it compromises the child's natural ability to self-regulate food intake based on nutrition requirements. As long as children are offered healthy food (no junk food) they will naturally eat what they need and no more. Forcing them to finish their plate can potentially ...


27

It's quite easy to find information on this study. The gist of it is that if you force to your child to eat everything on their plate, they are more likely to become obese as an adult. That's messed up, so... please don't do this to your child. "New findings have shown that pushing children to eat everything on their plate has a direct link to obesity. ...


22

Please do not read this answer as bashing your parenting style. I know from experience that it's easy to fall into a pattern of wanting your child to eat more or differently, and end up coercing them into doing so. My daughter was flagged as underweight by her doctors as a toddler, so as a family we have a long history of struggling with helping her eat well ...


11

A child will not starve itself. She is probably not eating because she is not hungry. Forcing her will only make it less enjoyable for her, imo. Ask her if she is hungry/if she wants to eat something at some points of the day. When she does, propose food you can give her, and follow her tastes. If she is hungry when you also are eating, propose to eat with ...


10

The reason "for", generally, is grounded in a largely depression-era concern that you may not have enough nutrition/calories in the future. Literally, you need to eat it or you might starve. That was a concern in the 30s, and people raised then often took that to heart and kept it in the 50s and 60s when they were having kids. That said, there is an ...


8

As a preliminary: IME this is just the age around which this is worst. Young children eagerly eat everything you suggest tastes good, older children learn to experiment. In between, they wreck your nerves. :) I currently also have a seven year old and when it comes to being picky about food she's currently by far the worst of my children – despite the fact ...


8

She's old enough to realize what eating is and that it is necessary. If she doesn't want to eat, don't make her. But make it clear that when she refuses, the next meal will be in, say, 3 hours. If that's her choice, stick to it. Don't give in by offering her something to eat in the meantime, don't let her fill up on sweets, etc., be strong and wait for the ...


8

For most children, cow's milk (organic or not at your preference) will be the superior choice. Whole milk is usually recommended from 1-2 years old, although there is starting to be some preference for 2% even at that age for children at high risk and who have good, healthy diets with plenty of fats and vegetables (like my second, who at 18 months though an ...


7

Sounds like you're doing the right thing to keep the doctor appraised of her condition and progress. A four year old isn't going to starve in a week or two. She's had a trauma, let her get over it at her own pace, as long as her doctor doesn't see any problem with it. That said, if you want some advice for helping her while she's getting over it: ...


6

You will need to provide more information (e.g. where do you live?) for a definitive answer. However, my hunch is that yes, the daycare center can do that. It might be a local/national government law, it might be a policy that they have put in place at this specific center. If it's the latter, it is unlikely this is specifically about your kids, but more ...


6

It is very common for adults who have experienced choking to avoid/dread food, and they understand how it happened. How much worse it must be for a child who doesn't really know the mechanics. You say you are frustrated because your doctors tell you to "wait it out". This is extremely sound advice. Any other method of dealing with this would traumatize her ...


6

Let me parse this out a bit. You and your wife (or, at least, your wife with your support) decided to cut milk out of your son's diet. It seems to have helped him. Your father felt free to criticize her decision, instead of asking you about it. He told your wife, the mother of your son, that her (and your, by the way) actions will make your son neurotic. ...


6

Ok, not from a professional, but from a parent's perspective: It seems you have built yourselves a nice battlefield with your son - I sense a power play and a lot of unnecessary tension. A vicious cycle. First step: Stop this right now. That means, no yelling, no fusing and, above all, no force feeding. Try to eliminate this battle ground completely. ...


5

Chocolate, eggs and honey are all safe at 12 months, unless your children have a specific allergy to them. Too much chocolate or honey could be bad for their teeth. Also see info below about feeding too much sweet foods to babies. Eggs should be cooked until the yolks are solid, to avoid the risk of salmonella. (NHS Choices: Eggs. See section "Egg ...


5

Ideally babies shouldn't be eating anything other than milk much before they're six months old. This is because they don't have the motor skills yet to move food around in their mouths, and their gut hasn't matured enough to be able to digest other foods properly. There is some evidence that early introduction of solid food increases the chance of food ...


4

We had significant battles with both of our children (still ongoing with our 2 year old) over eating more, and we've had to force the issue on occasion. A couple points to keep in mind: Our children are both built very slender, and they are considered under weight. We've been encouraged by their doctor to do what we can to get more calories into them ...


4

You will have disputes with your children. That's inevitable, so you should avoid creating them when unnecessary. I often ask myself "Is this a fight worth winning?" If the answer is no, I don't make it an issue. I think "cleaning your plate" is such a case.


4

Make sure mealtimes look like mealtimes: Have children in highchairs. Have the highchairs pulled up to the table. Have adults sit and eat with them at the same time. Lead by example (i.e. do not throw food around yourselves!) Where possible eat the same food as the children are having. Do not offer endless alternatives that the children can have instead. ...


4

Some suggestions - these worked for our family - mix and match what works for yours... Eat with her. Eat the same food at the same time. If she sees you eating it, she'll copy you. It may help to serve everyone from the same saucepan - on the table where she can see it - or even serve her from your plate, so she thinks she's getting 'your' food. The more ...


3

It's hard to tell from the info in your question whether this is a medical issue or a behavioral one, or a combination of the two. It's clear that force-feeding is backfiring and not getting the desired result. We've followed the advice of Ellyn Satter on The Division of Responsibility for Feeding Kids, and it's worked well for our 1-year-old so far. ...


3

I think this question is best answered by evaluating the different types of milk. Organic vs "Regular" Milk There isn't clear evidence that either of these is better than the other. This article doesn't quote a lot of studies, but it nicely summarizes info that I have read in related studies. One problem with organic milk and organic foods in general ...


3

"to avoid" foods fall roughly into two categories: 1. Dangerous due to size or consistency. With other words, anything that can't be chewed/munched,/mushed/nibbeled into small enough pieces to prevent choking. With some babies it's amazing what they manage to "chew" just with their gums, others will resist even the smallest chunks in their puree. It's hard ...


2

During pregnancy it would be wise to 'feed' your wife exactly what she wants. In all seriousness though, my own observation is that this is a myth. My wife likes all sorts of food that our children wont eat. Also each child has their own preferences even though she ate pretty much the same things throughout both pregnancies.


2

So what's your actual question? How to make peace between your father and your wife? Or how to proceed with your son's diet? That phone conversation in itself doesn't sound too mysterious - it's very well possible that he honestly thought that he was just stating his concerns, but that he did so in a tone that sounded very accusing to your wife. It doesn't ...


2

She should be coming up on her 15 month visit in a few. See if she has fallen off her growth curve at that visit. You'll probably be surprised that she will not have done so. In the meantime, lots of kids show variability in their eating. Keep offering her baby foods (try some fruits), cereals, or pureed table foods (introduce with care; she's still young). ...


2

If she's going to restrict herself to four foods, then choosing bread, butter, carrots, and pomegranate is not so bad. There are far worse diets she could be on. Enough bread should give her plenty of energy to participate in whatever sports she's interested in. I wouldn't worry about that at all. If she was lacking in energy, you'd know it! Carrots and ...


2

Don't push your wife to call your dad. Apologize to your wife for not doing it earlier, and do it now. When you speak to your father, don't hash over the past, but tell him in a way that does not invite discussion why you have decided to do what you've done, how it's helped, and that you will be following this plan in the future. Then switch to ...


2

Our approach has been to put on our daughter's plate what we expect to count as supper. Then it's up to her whether or not she wants to eat it, but if she does not she cannot move on to any snacking/desert or anything like that. Then we don't have to fight with her about it though. The rule is that she cannot have a snack later if she doesn't eat her meal ...


2

I don't believe you will find such a list for a child that young. Babies under one year of age should be getting most of their nutrition from breast milk (or formula if you are formula feeding). Any solid food that they get is really just practice for switching over to solid foods. You should be offering your baby a wide variety of different foods at this ...



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