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9

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP): The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants be fed breast milk or iron-fortified formula during the first 12 months of life. Between ages 4 - 6 months, certain solid foods may be added. Breast milk or iron-fortified formula, along with age-appropriate solid foods and juices ...


8

Your son may have dysphagia, a feeding and swallowing disorder. While there may be physical problems that need to be addressed, generally the disorder is treated with physical therapy designed to strengthen the muscles involved and train the mouth and throat to function properly. The linked article from the American Speech Language and Hearing Association ...


8

I did "open face" sandwiches - one piece of bread with something spread on it - and cut them into "sticks". They can pick up the stick and bite off a piece. I probably cut 4 or 5 sticks from each slice of bread (just like "soldiers" for eggs.) It's easier to cut them when it's open face, because you're not squeezing out the filling as you cut through the top ...


7

I'm not sure that I'm qualified to be answering -- it's been over a decade since my child was that age -- but, for what it's worth, I'm going to give my 2¢. If a child is waking b/c they are hungry, then that is the only thing which will comfort them. If the child is waking for any other reason -- dirty diaper, bad dream, etc -- then curing that issue ...


7

Use a chopping board. Use a bread knife - these have scalloped serrations. Place the sandwich on the chopping board. Place the knife, blade edge down, on the sandwich. Place one hand over the blade back and the sandwich, thus holding the sandwich safely. Or place the blade on the sandwich and place your other hand on the sandwich next to the knife - ...


6

No, their diet is not reasonable. They are building bodies so need a significant amount of protein, calcium, iron, and vitamins (that's before you even look at trace minerals, omega group of fatty oils and such). Even though our children eat almost everything (and lots of it), a blood test showed our son was short on iron and vitamin D. It is critical for ...


5

You don't really know, but you can make some educated guesses. Is your daughter eating a reasonable amount during the day? Does how much she eats during the day affect how often she wakes up? Keep track for a few days, and try varying it a bit. If you find a maximum - ie, an amount either that she's unwilling to eat more than, or that doesn't have any ...


5

Have you seen those silicone squeeze pouches for infant feeding? They are sized for baby hands and you can fill them with soft foods like applesauce or other purees or yogurt. They're basically a reusable alternative to the disposable squeeze pouches you can get at the grocery store and I like that you can fill it with homemade food and control the amount of ...


4

It has me a little concerned that your doctor suggested that you supplement your daughter's diet with solids rather than pumped breastmilk or even formula. I get that your wife is returning to work and won't be able to breastfeed as she can at home, but, at this age, all of your daughter's nutritional requirements should be met with either formula or ...


4

The issue with diet is less about cooked versus uncooked than it is about developing lifelong good eating habits. The research I am reading suggests that your adult diet of one cooked meal and two cold meals is the better model for your child. We can argue about the nutritional value and the digestibility of a cooked carrot versus a raw carrot, but that ...


4

You could try the baby-led weaning approach. This approach begins by allowing babies to start tasting food, not mush or puree or some packet formula, while not expecting them to actually eat very much of it. We started our daughter using this approach at 5 months of age. At first, she ate mango, watermelon, tomato (with the skin removed) and kiwi (with skin ...


4

Flights are a brief disruption to routine, so you can and should adjust your routines to accommodate them as well. In other words, if baby can't eat soft and juicy things cleanly yet, then either serve only non-soft/juicy foods he can eat well, or feed him with a spoon. Skipping one day of "learning how to eat" won't do any harm. And oh, some unsolicited ...


4

Obviously your wife's health is paramount and giving her things that she is allergic to is a bad idea. Equally, I'm sure the advice to avoid (or severely limit) alcohol intake and not to smoke during pregnancy should be well publicised enough to be taken as read, but just in case. The NHS (UK National Health Service) publishes a lot of advice online now ...


4

There are certain kinds of baker's goods that can be cut into small enough slices (or even pieces) with a sharp knife - like baguettes or various breadrolls. For example the breadroll below - don't cut it exactly in half, cut it into small slices and you will have several sandwiches with sizes perfectly matching the size of your kid's hands and mouth. ,


4

Children accept or reject foods based on different reasons than adults do. Often the exact same food (to you) will be accepted if you change some trivial aspect of it. Some tips: texture really matters. Many kids reject meat for texture reasons. There's a reason why burgers are such a popular kid food. Burgers, meatballs, meatloaf, sausages, any time the ...


4

I used to boil a week's worth of various fruits and vegetables (no added salt), puree them individually, set a bit aside for the weekend, pour them in ice cube trays and put them in the freezer. Then we'd take them out as needed every weekday morning and add some oil, put it in a jar to defrost by lunchtime at daycare where they'd warm it up and feed it to ...


3

A lot of people recommend cold carrots, but the problem with carrots is that the baby can break a piece off that is just the right size to choke him. If you try carrots, you should watch carefully, and preferably only allow him to gnaw on the fat end where he is only likely to get scrapings rather than chunks. It is difficult to come up with a "natural" ...


3

Traditionally you avoid "rewarding" children for trying new foods. Thus, you don't say "have three spoons of broccoli and then you can have pudding" because that creates bad incentives and teaches the child that the food is yucky. But there's an interesting new approach where you ask the child to try a tiny bit, and reward them with a sticker. Soon, ...


3

We had this problem mostly with meats but also for other foods as well. We found the following works well (suggested by occupational therapist): First stage: Kiss the new food. That's all... no pressure to even put in mouth. Do it for a few meals. Second stage: "Rocket it" - put in mouth and immediately spit out into napkin or trashcan. Make it fun- ...


3

First, to be clear, I am ABSOLUTELY NOT diagnosing anything! I have nowhere near enough information to have anything more than a suspicion. Even that suspicion is tenuous at best. In no way should you take my words over the internet as anything other than general information, and you should see a professional for an appropriate evaluation for your child. ...


3

I would suggest that, at the age of the child that jam sandwiches are appropriate, cutting into truly small pieces is not necessary for most breads. I gave my then-7 month old long strips of basic store bought sandwich bread (wheat, but not crunchy-wheat), perhaps 1-2cm wide by 8cm long or so, and he dealt with it fine. Younger than that I probably ...


2

I haven't been able to dig up any research stating explicitly that "cooked" lunches are better for your child than cold lunches. It gets extremely hot here in the summer and I would prefer to eat something like a sandwich or salad rather than a hot meal for lunch. Who wants to turn on their oven/stove in the middle of a 90+ degree day? Bleh. From a ...


2

My toddler isn't too fond of eggs either. One thing we do for him is make french toast since toast is often served when we have eggs for breakfast it really isn't that much extra work to make. Another thing we do is finely scramble them and add them to his oatmeal. It sounds weird but you can't taste it at all and the texture is very similar to the oats. ...


2

Ellyn Satter's Division of Responsibility in Feeding is extraordinarily helpful here. For toddlers through adolescents it is: The parent is responsible for what, when, where The child is responsible for how much and whether Parents' feeding jobs: Choose and prepare the food Provide regular meals and snacks Make eating times ...


2

Get him involved in the prep of food. Even if it's something as simple as tearing a lettuce apart into shreds with their hands. Maybe try growing some herbs in a pot, and strawberries. Make some healthy pizza's and show them that yucky foods and yummy foods together don't taste bad. Like chicken wrapped in lettuce with a cheese, and broccoli sauce in the ...


2

"What shouldn't she eat?" is actually a much easier question, as the vast majority of foods are just fine during pregnancy. The guidelines you have (no unpasteurized products, cook everything thoroughly) are the standard ones, but aside from that, let yourself be guided by her tastes. Senses such as taste can dramatically change during pregnancy, becoming ...


2

The World Health Organization suggests: "As a global public health recommendation, infants should be exclusively breastfed for the first six months of life to achieve optimal growth, development and health. Thereafter, to meet their evolving nutritional requirements, infants should receive nutritionally adequate and safe complementary foods ...


2

I know you said you wanted something edible but how about a frozen, clean washcloth? My kids LOVED this. I'd wet it, tie it in a knot, and freeze it. Not totally, just until it was stiff. They'd gnaw on it for hours. The thought of fabric in my mouth gives me the willies, truthfully, but as long as they r happy (and safe) I'm happy. I also used to give them ...


2

You could blend a fruit puree into an ice cube tray, freeze them, then put them in the fruit mesh bags like these. You would have control over the recipe and the mesh bag would prevent the baby from getting more than they can handle. This would be messier especially now that it's not a whole fruit and actually a dripping ice cube. ...


2

I just coached my best friend through this same situation. I have three children; ages 9, almost 4, and 22 months. I breast fed two of them, bottle fed one. Someone already mentioned that this makes a difference: it does. My bottle fed boy had no trouble sleeping through the night by the time he started polishing off an 8 oz bottle at bedtime (around 20 ...



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