Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

50

This is what my mother did with us (it wouldn't work with very young children; I can't recall what she did then): We were never served food. It came to the table in whatever pot it was cooked in, and placed on a block of wood (to avoid burning the table). We then served ourselves out of that pot (or those pots, pans, whatever, depending on what the food ...


49

Advantages.... None Disadvantages... It creates unnecessary conflict with the child, and it compromises the child's natural ability to self-regulate food intake based on nutrition requirements. As long as children are offered healthy food (no junk food) they will naturally eat what they need and no more. Forcing them to finish their plate can potentially ...


27

It's quite easy to find information on this study. The gist of it is that if you force to your child to eat everything on their plate, they are more likely to become obese as an adult. That's messed up, so... please don't do this to your child. "New findings have shown that pushing children to eat everything on their plate has a direct link to obesity. ...


15

As a matter of fact, there is. Use a pair of scissors. If you take a large pair of scissors, you'll be able to cut it as fine as possible. And this method isn't limited to just bread, either.


14

I currently live in Japan. Needless to say, tea is extremely popular. Infants (9 months+) are sometimes given a certain type of tea called 麦茶, otherwise known as roasted barley tea. It is a caffeine free tea so it didn't make her jittery or keep her up and also has a few health benefits in the realm of bacterial resistance. This is the only tea we have given ...


10

Freeze it first... then cut it up. By the time you are done, it will probably be thawed out for eating!


10

The reason "for", generally, is grounded in a largely depression-era concern that you may not have enough nutrition/calories in the future. Literally, you need to eat it or you might starve. That was a concern in the 30s, and people raised then often took that to heart and kept it in the 50s and 60s when they were having kids. That said, there is an ...


9

I did "open face" sandwiches - one piece of bread with something spread on it - and cut them into "sticks". They can pick up the stick and bite off a piece. I probably cut 4 or 5 sticks from each slice of bread (just like "soldiers" for eggs.) It's easier to cut them when it's open face, because you're not squeezing out the filling as you cut through the top ...


8

No, their diet is not reasonable. They are building bodies so need a significant amount of protein, calcium, iron, and vitamins (that's before you even look at trace minerals, omega group of fatty oils and such). Even though our children eat almost everything (and lots of it), a blood test showed our son was short on iron and vitamin D. It is critical for ...


8

Use a chopping board. Use a bread knife - these have scalloped serrations. Place the sandwich on the chopping board. Place the knife, blade edge down, on the sandwich. Place one hand over the blade back and the sandwich, thus holding the sandwich safely. Or place the blade on the sandwich and place your other hand on the sandwich next to the knife - ...


8

I would not give caffeinated tea (true tea) to an infant. Separate from the iron absorption issues (and it's not just iron; caffeine has a lot of negative effects on mineral and vitamin levels), the effect on mood is also significantly relevant to children. That said, if she is breastfed, and Mom's having any caffeine, then so is she. Small amounts ...


8

As a preliminary: IME this is just the age around which this is worst. Young children eagerly eat everything you suggest tastes good, older children learn to experiment. In between, they wreck your nerves. :) I currently also have a seven year old and when it comes to being picky about food she's currently by far the worst of my children – despite the fact ...


7

I'm not sure that I'm qualified to be answering -- it's been over a decade since my child was that age -- but, for what it's worth, I'm going to give my 2¢. If a child is waking b/c they are hungry, then that is the only thing which will comfort them. If the child is waking for any other reason -- dirty diaper, bad dream, etc -- then curing that issue ...


7

Infants do not have strong immune systems. A quick perusal of an academic database yielded three articles within the first 10 hits that caused concern (search terms tea infants): Stojanović, M. M., Katić, V., & Kuzmanović, J. (2011). Isolation of Cronobacter sakazakii from different herbal teas. Vojnosanitetski Pregled: Military Medical & ...


7

Sounds like you're doing the right thing to keep the doctor appraised of her condition and progress. A four year old isn't going to starve in a week or two. She's had a trauma, let her get over it at her own pace, as long as her doctor doesn't see any problem with it. That said, if you want some advice for helping her while she's getting over it: ...


6

Children accept or reject foods based on different reasons than adults do. Often the exact same food (to you) will be accepted if you change some trivial aspect of it. Some tips: texture really matters. Many kids reject meat for texture reasons. There's a reason why burgers are such a popular kid food. Burgers, meatballs, meatloaf, sausages, any time the ...


6

Let me parse this out a bit. You and your wife (or, at least, your wife with your support) decided to cut milk out of your son's diet. It seems to have helped him. Your father felt free to criticize her decision, instead of asking you about it. He told your wife, the mother of your son, that her (and your, by the way) actions will make your son neurotic. ...


6

It is very common for adults who have experienced choking to avoid/dread food, and they understand how it happened. How much worse it must be for a child who doesn't really know the mechanics. You say you are frustrated because your doctors tell you to "wait it out". This is extremely sound advice. Any other method of dealing with this would traumatize her ...


5

You don't really know, but you can make some educated guesses. Is your daughter eating a reasonable amount during the day? Does how much she eats during the day affect how often she wakes up? Keep track for a few days, and try varying it a bit. If you find a maximum - ie, an amount either that she's unwilling to eat more than, or that doesn't have any ...


5

It seems, from what you listed that you are currently doing, that you have all your bases covered. She's at the age where you can somewhat appeal to her logically (i.e. the tomatoes), she has been appealed to by other's good experiences with the food (her brother), she has met you halfway on trying them outside of being cooked into something (the sandwich), ...


5

In my experience, spicy food is something that one can build up a tolerance to. Eat one raw clove of garlic, and it's going to be overwhelming. Eat them once a day, and within a few days, it doesn't seem nearly so strong (and yes, I've tried it; I used to use it as a means of discouraging mosquitos from biting me while spending long periods outdoors... I'm ...


5

Chocolate, eggs and honey are all safe at 12 months, unless your children have a specific allergy to them. Too much chocolate or honey could be bad for their teeth. Also see info below about feeding too much sweet foods to babies. Eggs should be cooked until the yolks are solid, to avoid the risk of salmonella. (NHS Choices: Eggs. See section "Egg ...


5

You will need to provide more information (e.g. where do you live?) for a definitive answer. However, my hunch is that yes, the daycare center can do that. It might be a local/national government law, it might be a policy that they have put in place at this specific center. If it's the latter, it is unlikely this is specifically about your kids, but more ...


4

There are certain kinds of baker's goods that can be cut into small enough slices (or even pieces) with a sharp knife - like baguettes or various breadrolls. For example the breadroll below - don't cut it exactly in half, cut it into small slices and you will have several sandwiches with sizes perfectly matching the size of your kid's hands and mouth. ,


4

I would suggest that, at the age of the child that jam sandwiches are appropriate, cutting into truly small pieces is not necessary for most breads. I gave my then-7 month old long strips of basic store bought sandwich bread (wheat, but not crunchy-wheat), perhaps 1-2cm wide by 8cm long or so, and he dealt with it fine. Younger than that I probably ...


4

I used to boil a week's worth of various fruits and vegetables (no added salt), puree them individually, set a bit aside for the weekend, pour them in ice cube trays and put them in the freezer. Then we'd take them out as needed every weekday morning and add some oil, put it in a jar to defrost by lunchtime at daycare where they'd warm it up and feed it to ...


4

Could it be a sensory processing issue? You've tried every single thing I've ever heard of for picky eaters (former picky eater here and mother to one that refuses to eat anything not processed within an inch of its life) and you're not seeing any results. Maybe it's time to bring in an occupational therapist that specializes in pediatric issues; they're ...


4

You will have disputes with your children. That's inevitable, so you should avoid creating them when unnecessary. I often ask myself "Is this a fight worth winning?" If the answer is no, I don't make it an issue. I think "cleaning your plate" is such a case.


4

We had significant battles with both of our children (still ongoing with our 2 year old) over eating more, and we've had to force the issue on occasion. A couple points to keep in mind: Our children are both built very slender, and they are considered under weight. We've been encouraged by their doctor to do what we can to get more calories into them ...


3

Pizza cutter. It's also great for pancakes.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible