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51

This is what my mother did with us (it wouldn't work with very young children; I can't recall what she did then): We were never served food. It came to the table in whatever pot it was cooked in, and placed on a block of wood (to avoid burning the table). We then served ourselves out of that pot (or those pots, pans, whatever, depending on what the food ...


50

Advantages.... None Disadvantages... It creates unnecessary conflict with the child, and it compromises the child's natural ability to self-regulate food intake based on nutrition requirements. As long as children are offered healthy food (no junk food) they will naturally eat what they need and no more. Forcing them to finish their plate can potentially ...


26

It's quite easy to find information on this study. The gist of it is that if you force to your child to eat everything on their plate, they are more likely to become obese as an adult. That's messed up, so... please don't do this to your child. "New findings have shown that pushing children to eat everything on their plate has a direct link to obesity. ...


22

Please do not read this answer as bashing your parenting style. I know from experience that it's easy to fall into a pattern of wanting your child to eat more or differently, and end up coercing them into doing so. My daughter was flagged as underweight by her doctors as a toddler, so as a family we have a long history of struggling with helping her eat well ...


12

A child will not starve itself. She is probably not eating because she is not hungry. Forcing her will only make it less enjoyable for her, imo. Ask her if she is hungry/if she wants to eat something at some points of the day. When she does, propose food you can give her, and follow her tastes. If she is hungry when you also are eating, propose to eat with ...


10

We've got two working adults and three kids — we're very familiar with the scheduling challenges this causes. (Once your daughter starts having extracurricular activities, things will only get more hectic!) First off, if you want the whole family to be eating the same meal at the same time, a snack on the way home for your daughter is pretty critical to ...


10

The reason "for", generally, is grounded in a largely depression-era concern that you may not have enough nutrition/calories in the future. Literally, you need to eat it or you might starve. That was a concern in the 30s, and people raised then often took that to heart and kept it in the 50s and 60s when they were having kids. That said, there is an ...


8

As a preliminary: IME this is just the age around which this is worst. Young children eagerly eat everything you suggest tastes good, older children learn to experiment. In between, they wreck your nerves. :) I currently also have a seven year old and when it comes to being picky about food she's currently by far the worst of my children – despite the fact ...


8

She's old enough to realize what eating is and that it is necessary. If she doesn't want to eat, don't make her. But make it clear that when she refuses, the next meal will be in, say, 3 hours. If that's her choice, stick to it. Don't give in by offering her something to eat in the meantime, don't let her fill up on sweets, etc., be strong and wait for the ...


8

For most children, cow's milk (organic or not at your preference) will be the superior choice. Whole milk is usually recommended from 1-2 years old, although there is starting to be some preference for 2% even at that age for children at high risk and who have good, healthy diets with plenty of fats and vegetables (like my second, who at 18 months though an ...


7

Sounds like you're doing the right thing to keep the doctor appraised of her condition and progress. A four year old isn't going to starve in a week or two. She's had a trauma, let her get over it at her own pace, as long as her doctor doesn't see any problem with it. That said, if you want some advice for helping her while she's getting over it: ...


6

Let me parse this out a bit. You and your wife (or, at least, your wife with your support) decided to cut milk out of your son's diet. It seems to have helped him. Your father felt free to criticize her decision, instead of asking you about it. He told your wife, the mother of your son, that her (and your, by the way) actions will make your son neurotic. ...


6

It is very common for adults who have experienced choking to avoid/dread food, and they understand how it happened. How much worse it must be for a child who doesn't really know the mechanics. You say you are frustrated because your doctors tell you to "wait it out". This is extremely sound advice. Any other method of dealing with this would traumatize her ...


6

You will need to provide more information (e.g. where do you live?) for a definitive answer. However, my hunch is that yes, the daycare center can do that. It might be a local/national government law, it might be a policy that they have put in place at this specific center. If it's the latter, it is unlikely this is specifically about your kids, but more ...


6

Ok, not from a professional, but from a parent's perspective: It seems you have built yourselves a nice battlefield with your son - I sense a power play and a lot of unnecessary tension. A vicious cycle. First step: Stop this right now. That means, no yelling, no fusing and, above all, no force feeding. Try to eliminate this battle ground completely. ...


5

Chocolate, eggs and honey are all safe at 12 months, unless your children have a specific allergy to them. Too much chocolate or honey could be bad for their teeth. Also see info below about feeding too much sweet foods to babies. Eggs should be cooked until the yolks are solid, to avoid the risk of salmonella. (NHS Choices: Eggs. See section "Egg ...


5

Ideally babies shouldn't be eating anything other than milk much before they're six months old. This is because they don't have the motor skills yet to move food around in their mouths, and their gut hasn't matured enough to be able to digest other foods properly. There is some evidence that early introduction of solid food increases the chance of food ...


4

How about giving her a small amount of food that doesn't need preperation as soon as she gets home? Enough food for her to be less hungry, but not that much that she's really full? That way you or your husband can prepare the main dish as soon as you're home, and she can eat with you? Or ask the daycare if it is possible to give her some fruit between ...


4

Meat, in and of itself, isn't something that you must eat any particular amount of. Many people are quite successful vegetarians and vegans, even as children, and on the other side of things, well, many children have meat-centric meals at least as much as you describe with no ill effects. The important consideration is the diet as a whole, and what effect ...


4

You will have disputes with your children. That's inevitable, so you should avoid creating them when unnecessary. I often ask myself "Is this a fight worth winning?" If the answer is no, I don't make it an issue. I think "cleaning your plate" is such a case.


4

We had significant battles with both of our children (still ongoing with our 2 year old) over eating more, and we've had to force the issue on occasion. A couple points to keep in mind: Our children are both built very slender, and they are considered under weight. We've been encouraged by their doctor to do what we can to get more calories into them ...


4

Some suggestions - these worked for our family - mix and match what works for yours... Eat with her. Eat the same food at the same time. If she sees you eating it, she'll copy you. It may help to serve everyone from the same saucepan - on the table where she can see it - or even serve her from your plate, so she thinks she's getting 'your' food. The more ...


4

Make sure mealtimes look like mealtimes: Have children in highchairs. Have the highchairs pulled up to the table. Have adults sit and eat with them at the same time. Lead by example (i.e. do not throw food around yourselves!) Where possible eat the same food as the children are having. Do not offer endless alternatives that the children can have instead. ...


4

Use sunbutter or wowbutter and jelly. They are peanut butter substitutes that are supposed to taste exactly like peanut butter, but are both 100% peanut free! I have a peanut allergy and I eat it all the time.


3

In addition to Erica's detailed and excellent answer, a few notes for how we handle this (in a similar situation). Most of our meals are planned around our schedules. We have nights that one of us is home a bit earlier, and nights one of us will be home later (or both). On nights that we can be home a bit earlier, we plan dinners that might take a bit of ...


3

The recommendations on how much of a particular food group should be included in a healthy diet give amounts per day, and aren't so concerned about which meals each item is included in. Depending on which set of guidelines you look at, a seven year old girl should be getting 3-5 ounces of lean proteins a day. Here are a couple of links to charts that break ...


3

While most two-year-olds should not be waking because of hunger in the middle of the night, every person's metabolism is different. That said, do you have reason to suspect his is higher than most? Does he run around more than his peers, does he eat more, is he thinner, or is he growing faster? Otherwise he just may have gotten into the habit of getting ...


3

No, toddlers should not (regularly) drink milk or formula during the night. The major reason for this is tooth decay. Toddlers have a fairly full set of teeth, and formula in particular has a lot of plain old sugar in it. Putting them to bed with a bottle, or even feeding them immediately before they sleep for 4-6 hours, is bad for their teeth, and can ...


3

It's hard to tell from the info in your question whether this is a medical issue or a behavioral one, or a combination of the two. It's clear that force-feeding is backfiring and not getting the desired result. We've followed the advice of Ellyn Satter on The Division of Responsibility for Feeding Kids, and it's worked well for our 1-year-old so far. ...


3

I think this question is best answered by evaluating the different types of milk. Organic vs "Regular" Milk There isn't clear evidence that either of these is better than the other. This article doesn't quote a lot of studies, but it nicely summarizes info that I have read in related studies. One problem with organic milk and organic foods in general ...



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