Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

No, their diet is not reasonable. They are building bodies so need a significant amount of protein, calcium, iron, and vitamins (that's before you even look at trace minerals, omega group of fatty oils and such). Even though our children eat almost everything (and lots of it), a blood test showed our son was short on iron and vitamin D. It is critical for ...


4

I used to boil a week's worth of various fruits and vegetables (no added salt), puree them individually, set a bit aside for the weekend, pour them in ice cube trays and put them in the freezer. Then we'd take them out as needed every weekday morning and add some oil, put it in a jar to defrost by lunchtime at daycare where they'd warm it up and feed it to ...


4

Children accept or reject foods based on different reasons than adults do. Often the exact same food (to you) will be accepted if you change some trivial aspect of it. Some tips: texture really matters. Many kids reject meat for texture reasons. There's a reason why burgers are such a popular kid food. Burgers, meatballs, meatloaf, sausages, any time the ...


2

Definitely not. Dave covered that well. How do you deal with it? Well, for one, stop giving them fruit for dessert. They're both old enough to understand hunger. If they don't eat their dinner, no additional food is available; dinner is in the fridge and can be brought out an hour later. Otherwise, sorry. Going to bed hungry one or two nights won't ...


2

Give them a nudge If your child is a picky eater, it's your job as a parent to give them a little bit of a nudge. They will be less healthy and it won't serve them in later life. My middle child who is a picky eater has noticeably less stamina than the other two. Find out what motivates them You need to find out what motivates your child. You can use this ...


2

By 8 months to 1 year, we were feeding both of our children what we ate - no difference. Obviously if you haven't gone through very many foods yet (and thus have allergy concerns), limit this to what you've tried already; we started solids around 4 months so by 8 months had hit all of the high notes there. What's nutritious for you is also nutritious for ...


1

You might look into a food intolerance (inability to digest), the most common being lactose intolerance. At this age (over 2) the digestive system is usually running fairly smoothly, as the child has had enough time to build a sufficient population of healthy bacteria. They are not "allergic", since there is no histamine reaction, and so is typically not a ...


1

Jealousy is natural tendency we find among infants and babies. You simply cannot help it and it goes with the time. Have you ever seen two grown up twins fighting over a morsel to eat first? Don't worry, this will go as they grow. As of now, if alternating spoon-feeding has not worked, for a period being, you can treat/feed them separately. You take one of ...


1

It's important to distinguish lactose intolerance from dairy allergy. Lactose intolerance occurs when the body loses the ability to digest lactose. Someone with lactose intolerance can consume lactose-free dairy products (including hard cheeses) without trouble; lactose-containing dairy products will cause gastrointestinal upset, but no other problems. On ...


1

I can't improve on Dave's answer but I can add some advice about picky eaters. Our 5-yr-old is so picky she was bordering on malnutrition. After a visit to the doc to get her checked, he recommended protein and nutritional drinks to supplement her diet. (We use a protein powder that's essentially a meal replacement; took trying a LOT of different ones to ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible