Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

51

This is what my mother did with us (it wouldn't work with very young children; I can't recall what she did then): We were never served food. It came to the table in whatever pot it was cooked in, and placed on a block of wood (to avoid burning the table). We then served ourselves out of that pot (or those pots, pans, whatever, depending on what the food ...


50

Advantages.... None Disadvantages... It creates unnecessary conflict with the child, and it compromises the child's natural ability to self-regulate food intake based on nutrition requirements. As long as children are offered healthy food (no junk food) they will naturally eat what they need and no more. Forcing them to finish their plate can potentially ...


31

Honey shouldn't be given till the age of 1 year. It can contain spores of Clostridium botulinum, which causes botulism. An adult's intestinal tract can prevent the growth of these spores, but in a baby the spores can grow and produce life-threatening toxins.


26

It's quite easy to find information on this study. The gist of it is that if you force to your child to eat everything on their plate, they are more likely to become obese as an adult. That's messed up, so... please don't do this to your child. "New findings have shown that pushing children to eat everything on their plate has a direct link to obesity. ...


24

My five kids range from "ultra picky" to "eat only healthy foods" to "surprise, I've changed my likes and dislikes". Keep healthy foods around, so their choices are all generally healthy. Keep reintroducing new foods that they wouldn't eat within a reasonably close timeframe. Sometimes it takes 7-8 tries. Try different ways of preparing the same foods. Try ...


22

My first answer comes from the addiction treatment, and says this: Don't bring the enemy into your home. That is to say, don't have sweets and junk in the house, or buy them for the children when outside. Opportunity is necessary for any crime. The second answer goes to motive. If the child is full and satisfied, she'll eat less junk. A nutritionist I know ...


22

Please do not read this answer as bashing your parenting style. I know from experience that it's easy to fall into a pattern of wanting your child to eat more or differently, and end up coercing them into doing so. My daughter was flagged as underweight by her doctors as a toddler, so as a family we have a long history of struggling with helping her eat well ...


21

There has been some research done on effects of caffeine in children. The bottom line is that caffeine is generally safe, but it does have significant effects in children as well as adults. Note that children are much more likely to encounter caffeine in a soft drink than in tea or coffee; that's what you have to worry about, I think, not Starbucks. A cup ...


19

Most parents don't believe this, but kids will not starve themselves to death for the sake of being persistently stubborn. The solution is simple. As long as they give you trouble: Don't have the foods "they like" around for them to snack on (e.g. not come hungry to the dinner table) What you want them to eat is "what we've got. We don't have anything ...


15

For those of us not in USA, "peep" is marshmallow candy: Wikipedia article. I had to look it up. As one user comments, infants can't chew food so they either spit it out, swallow it whole -- or choke on it! For this reason, infants should not be given food they can't swallow. If the parent feels that the infant really needs to eat a peep, then cut it up ...


15

As a matter of fact, there is. Use a pair of scissors. If you take a large pair of scissors, you'll be able to cut it as fine as possible. And this method isn't limited to just bread, either.


14

NEVER give in. Put him in another room (no one wants to be around tantrums, and tell him so) and wait it out. He may cry for a pretty long time the first couple of times but when he realizes it gets him ABSOLUTELY no attention the time will lessen. He ONLY gets desserts after eating dinner (you determine how much that is). If he is not hungry enough for ...


14

I currently live in Japan. Needless to say, tea is extremely popular. Infants (9 months+) are sometimes given a certain type of tea called 麦茶, otherwise known as roasted barley tea. It is a caffeine free tea so it didn't make her jittery or keep her up and also has a few health benefits in the realm of bacterial resistance. This is the only tea we have given ...


13

"Would fixing them differently be worth trying?" Given the immense number of ways one can prepare eggs, I'd say 'yes'. Each of my kids like eggs in different ways. One loves them hard-boiled or 'runny'. The other likes them scrambled. Given that the way one prepares an egg can dramatically change the texture, I'm thinking it's definitely worth a shot at ...


13

Short version: Once a child is older than 6 months, small amounts of sugar (sugar in moderation) are probably okay, but refined sugars should be avoided, and fruit juice intake should be restricted and monitored (The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends limiting juice intake to 4-6 ounces (118-177 milliliters) for kids under 7 years old, and no ...


12

A child will not starve itself. She is probably not eating because she is not hungry. Forcing her will only make it less enjoyable for her, imo. Ask her if she is hungry/if she wants to eat something at some points of the day. When she does, propose food you can give her, and follow her tastes. If she is hungry when you also are eating, propose to eat with ...


11

Raspberries are sounds that babies begin to produce between 4-6 months of age and can be made by blowing air through lax lips (bilabial) or by placing the tongue between the lips and blowing (lingua-labial). Raspberries precede the developmental stage of babbling and result from a child's efforts to gain oral motor control needed for later speech ...


11

Let him help prepare the eggs with you. That way, he can be part of the process of making the food itself, and can see where everything comes from. He can also suggest ridiculous ingredients (Honey! Cheerios! etc) and see where those experiments take him. We sat our toddler up on the counter and let him see the entire process of making the eggs. He was ...


11

Personally, I don't really think it makes sense to spend much effort preparing special food for the child at any age, so I tend to agree with Matthew Amster-Burton's guidance from his book Hungry Monkey. When it makes sense, we reduce the salt content of our infant's food by mixing it with blander ingredients (mainly rice, potatoes, or perhaps beans that ...


11

Some insights ... my daughter is 18 months old and we had the same kind of issues with her food a few months ago. Our doctor definitively said that there is no risk at this age to let them skip a meal or several. If she does not eat what we propose, we can safely not insists or offer sth else my wife and I (also my mother who takes care of her quite often) ...


11

It is probably not good practice to let your 4-month-old eat a marshmallow for more than simply the fact that it's a choking hazard. A Peep is a marshmallow which means it's mostly sugar, but also gelatin, various dyes (depending on which color of Peep she gave her child), dairy products, and preservatives. My best friend's mother buys Peeps every year, ...


11

If your child is younger than 12 months, I would refrain from giving cow's milk altogether, see What Happens If a Newborn Drinks Cow Milk? and Cow's milk: When and how to introduce it. Problems which can occur are nutritional deficiencies (most commonly iron deficiency), gastrointestinal irritation or allergic reactions. In general, babies' digestive tracts ...


11

As mentioned in your comments, perhaps giving her a high-protein snack pre-bedtime. An egg maybe or even a protein shake. You could make a pretty awesome high-protein, pre-bedtime smoothie with peanut or almond butter, yogurt and/or milk and a fruit of some kind. We know that eating protein helps to sort of stave off hunger by increasing the hormone ...


11

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP): The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants be fed breast milk or iron-fortified formula during the first 12 months of life. Between ages 4 - 6 months, certain solid foods may be added. Breast milk or iron-fortified formula, along with age-appropriate solid foods and juices ...


10

The usual rule is that pasteurised, hard cheeses (such as Cheddar, Red Leicester etc) are safe, but you should avoid soft cheeses (such as Brie) and avoid all unpasteurised cheeses. Pasteurisation kills off pretty much everything in a milk product, but soft cheeses can become a breeding ground for bacteria and dangerous moulds very rapidly, whereas hard ...


10

Early weaning probably won't help your baby sleep through the night. http://www.babycentre.co.uk/baby/sleep/solidsexpert/ No research supports this belief. Young babies given solid food (and this includes rice cereal in their bottle) at a young age, do not sleep any better than babies who are not given solid foods. It's an old wives' tale based on ...


10

Children need frequent and pleasant contact with a food to begin to eat it. Have her sit with you at the table for meals. Place foods before her with utensils and encourage her to play with the food. The goal at first is for the contact to be frequent AND pleasant. Help her be creative in her play by modeling fun food play with her on your plate as you ...


10

I have three children, the eldest daughter is the picky one. We have always had a rule that you are not forced to eat anything, but you have to taste - we made this rule explicitly to "one spoonful per one year of age" - so now that she's turned five, she will taste 5 spoonfuls of each dish. Sometimes she even ends up liking what she was suspicious about at ...


10

If he won't eat he's probably not hungry. Around one their growth slows down and they eat a bit less, and if he's still getting breast fed then he's probably getting enough calories from that he doesn't need solid food. So if you want him to eat: Stop breast feeding and bottle feeding so he will be hungry for solids Introduce a variety of foods, and make ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible