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23

Yes, it's okay for both parents to sleep at the same time, for several reasons. The human mind is finely tuned to the sound of crying babies, you'll be surprised at what you can hear subconsciously while you sleep. Our pediatrician wisely commented that newborns have only one desire - to grow older - so you can be sure they'll tell you if something is ...


10

You should visit the day care. If you show up unannounced, you can see them 'in action'. Below are some general guidelines and a few references. facilities does it look safe and clean? what toys are available? schedule what activities are included? are there opportunities for both individual and group play? do they have snack time? What do they ...


5

"It depends", on a lot of different factors. I hate to suggest something as negative sounding as "trial and error", but well, that seems to be the best way. To get through med school, and then go back to specialize in pediatrics... that seems like it's going to weed out the ones that just aren't any good at the base medicine. So really what you're left to ...


5

One idea that I have is to speak with members of the community who are parents with small children, and ask them to share a recommendation, if they feel that they have had a very positive experience with their pediatrician, or if not, ask for the flags. As far as warning signs go, I can only speak from personal experience, but some flags that got set off ...


5

To be honest, I don't think there is one. I've found that Amazon reviews, when there are enough for a particular product to weed out the usual instances of flakiness, irrelevance, and such, are the best bet, simply because they do provide enough viewpoints that there will usually be a couple of gems. The problem is that in order to review products you need ...


5

In the UK there is a regulatory body called OFSTED that makes random inspections. The reports from those inspections are available to the public. They give a rough guide to how good the facility is, but you have to be aware that they are a snapshot from a single day. If a bad centre is having a good day (or a good centre is having a bad day) the report ...


3

I lead a new father's course offered by our local hospital system. You should check to see if the hospital you plan on delivering at has something similar. Below are the suggested readings from my presentation materials. Books Bleidner, L. (2006). Mack Daddy: Mastering Fatherhood without Losing Your Style, Your Cool, or Your Mind. New York: Citadel. ...


3

We went through two pediatricians before finding the one we are using now. The first bullied and belittled me because as it turned out, I could not breastfeed. The second wasn't bad but the others in his practice were awful and he rarely had office hours in our location. Look at your plans about feeding, figure that they may change (they did for me!), ...


2

It depends on where you are planning to go and how many people you will come into contact with. Our pediatrician wanted us to wait three weeks with our daughter (full-term) and two months with our son (preemie & in NICU for a few weeks), to allow their immune systems to develop sufficiently to be able to handle most of the germs they'll come into ...


2

One book my wife liked a lot is Baby 411. Companion website at https://windsorpeak.com/sites/baby411/ It covers a ton of new parent ground without being overtly preachy or commercial. It's safe to start with this one. Also, she recommended http://www.babycheapskate.com as one of the better baby product recommendation blogs, though it is squarely in the ...


2

My husband was director of a daycare. In the US, every state has licensing requirements and periodically do onsite inspections at every facility. You can access the results of these inspections either through the daycare directly or through the licensing board. Information regarding inspection scores along with violations may be very revealing of the ...


2

Another strategy is to survey the nursing staff at the hospital asking who they use for their children. If they do not have children ask who they would recommend. Since they know work in the field, they probably know more about the reputation of the pediatricians. Often times, (at least in the hospitals that I work in) nurses are under utilized as resources ...


2

Aside from asking people with children for recommendations, try asking an OB/GYN. They see a lot of new mothers, and they know a lot of other doctors, and word gets around. In our case, my wife's OB/GYN (whom she'd been visiting for several years, and trusted implicitly) also happened to be a father of eight . He recommended a local pediatrics office, said ...


2

In the UK (so may not be much use to you) we have Which?: http://www.which.co.uk, it requires a paid subscription to access, but they do have fairly comprehensive reviews of various baby and child products, and they claim to be completely independent of any manufacturers.


2

My wife has the primary responsibility of getting up in the middle of the night and dealing with kids. We have three children, we both sleep at the same time and she still get's plenty of sleep. Make sure your kids eat a good dinner and go to bed at the same time every night. This will help you get your sleep. To answer your question, it is perfectly fine ...


2

When we had our first, we would check on her many times throughout the night. Everyone told us that we were being silly but we'd still check every time she made a noise (or worse, didn't). After a while, we bought an Anglecare baby monitor that included a motion detector - if the child stops breathing, then an alarm sounds. It is probably overkill, but it ...


1

The "What to Expect" series of books are a great resource! They have a lot of information, and there are chapters in there specifically for dads! Here is a link to the "What to Expect When You're Expecting." They helped me out a lot, I hope it helps you too.


1

Welcome Randolph! This answer may not be useful to you but I'm posting it for the benefit of others: For the German-language region, one very popular site is Parents.at - containing content on a very wide range of topics and featuring a forum and several other tools.



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