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7

First and foremost, a 2 month old should not be losing weight, speak to a healthcare professional (midwife, doctor or both). To answer your question, properly formulated stage 1 formula milk is suitable from birth, but it's best to discuss this with your doctor or midwife as there might be other things you want to try. And something else to think about, ...


6

First: don't worry! The fact that he chokes is scary, but it also shows that his body reacts to speed of the milk. My daughter had a similar issue (the milk came to fast for her to handle properly). We used the following tricks to great effect: Breastfeeding: use a Nipple shield. This enabled her to latch on and drink comfortably. Bottle: we switched to ...


5

See WebMD: In the old days when water supplies were not reliably clean, it made sense to sterilize baby bottles. But now, sterilizing bottles, nipples, and water is mostly unnecessary. Unless your water supply is suspected to harbor contaminated bacteria, it is as safe for your baby as it is for you. There is no reason to sterilize what is ...


4

For completeness, our baby was scheduled for a Continuous feed NGT tube, the tube from her nose to her stomach. Then was to be a slow drip feed, the equivalent of her normal feeding oz/per bottle feed now oz/hour. The advantage to this, for her, was no big bump of food at any given time, so no chance of a big dose of reflux. The bad news, you have a tube ...


4

Children at six months can be taught sign language, and asking for food and drink is usually the easiest thing to teach them. Sign language for babies is easy to learn because it involves logical motions and simple ones. Asking for food is moving hand toward face as if you have food in it. Asking for more is bringing hands together with fingers touching. ...


4

We have a 13 month old son who has a genetic condition that led him to having failure to thrive. He's been on an NG tube since 6 months old, so we understand how much of a pain it is to have one. Unfortunately, I don't think there is an easy answer, or one answer that works for everyone. Our OTs have said that we focus on making eating pleasurable and fun, ...


4

He may just not be ready. It takes a lot of muscles and coordination to swallow, especially if you have to get the stuff from the front of your mouth to the back, and kids learn how at different ages. At 7 months, I don't think there's anything to worry about. I'd start meals with breastmilk or formula, then offer solid or semi-solid foods, and then wrap up ...


3

I strongly suggest that you reverse the feeding order: What motivation is there to struggle with something new (many babies are hesitant to try new tastes or textures), if she's already (semi-)full? In general, following Ellyn Sattler's "Division of Responsibility" is a viable approach, meaning at your stage you offer the food you deem appropriate, she ...


3

As explained by Gruber's answer, sterilizing the bottles is usually completely unnecessary. However, there is a risk of buildup of harmful germs if the bottles are left to stand for too long with (rests of) milk inside. So while sterilizing is probably not required, you should wash them regularly and thoroughly, and refrigerate the milk as soon as possible. ...


3

Some old rule I remember some old person telling me was to boil all the stuff in hot water every week but only on saturdays. In my local language saturday is cleaning day. The other days the stuff would just get cleaning like the other dining utensils. But if the doctor has advised other treatment, than that should be followed. A way to sanitize sensitive ...


2

My daughter had a similar behavior, which was due (in her case) by colic (not sure if this is the right way to say it, english is not my native language). I am not saying that this is the case for your child, but it could be worth prospecting. What was happening to my daughter (at least how I understood it) was that feeding her calmed the pains, which would ...


2

I had this problem as my little one had poor suction anyway, especially when he was teething. Chewing is soothing to sore gums. Rather than putting the bottle in baby's mouth, I put it to his lips so he had to suck it in. I would also stroke his chin at the same time. However, this only works if baby is hungry. As he was feeding, if he began to chew, I ...


2

Wow, this sounds like a really tough situation. My daughter has never had much of an appetite and it is often a struggle to get her to eat (forget getting her to eat anything she doesn't like). Does your daughter like to go new places? Sometimes when we would put my daughter in a stroller or car seat and take her places she would eat (almost ...


2

Stephie is right, reverse the feeding order. Hunger is powerful. Keep the pouch and other favored items out of sight and start with the more solid stuff first. To be honest I wouldn't worry about it too much, but if you want to play hardball, make it seem like there's nothing else. Make feeding time over, and come back to it in 10mins. (10min is an ...


1

When we first started our children on semi-solids, my wife expressed some breast milk and mixed this in. It worked extremely well. It has a familiar taste then, so they know what to do with it.


1

Something I've always done with my little one is to say the word "Chew!" in between making over emphasised chewing motions with my mouth, and then "Swallow!" and making a big gulping swallow so he can see my neck moving. It often amuses him as if it's a bit of a game but does seem to work as it shows by example. Also it helps if he's choking a little bit ...


1

I've tried all the above with my little guy. One day I tried something new: I laid him on his back (try to get baby to relax if you can, it works much better) and I took his knee and crossed it over to his elbow. Left knee right elbow, right knee left elbow. Works every time. The farts come right out, it's amazing.


1

My son is 6 months and didn't stop his night feedings until 5 months. He is 16 lbs now was 6 lbs when he was born. I bathe him and put him to bed no later than 8:30. If he does wake up I put his binky in his mouth and he falls right back to sleep. That's how I broke his night feedings.


1

As it is a very trendy matter nowadays, I would also explore lactose intolerance as a possible cause of this. it may be that your child quickly gets under the impression she's done while it's just intolerance causing this. Therefore she quickly gets hungry, and so on... You can probably easily check this by testing soya milk for 1 or 2 feedings and see if ...


1

I personally would not recommend waking your baby up for any reason. When your baby is ready to eat he will let you know. There is no reason to wake him and and force him to eat. The only exception I would say would be a newborn who hasn't eaten yet. Since your baby is two weeks old, I would let him rest as long as he needs to and feed him when he wakes ...



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