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5

Noah & woliveirajr are both correct that there is some risk of reducing nutritional value, I'm sure. I will offer as counter point my home study (sample size=2) of children who were bottle-fed formula almost exclusively as infants; formula which was on occasion reheated in the microwave. They are now 12 and 9, healthy, and not malnourished. They ...


5

Depending on the formula that you're using, they might have some probiotics in their composition. For example, Nestlé. Probiotics have small tolerance to high temperatures, so preparing the formula (or heating it after it was prepared) above some temperature might kill those probiotics, reducing the nutritional value of the formula. For example, this ...


3

It's certainly not illegal, it's just ill-advised. When it comes to your child's safety, is it really worth taking the risk? I believe a better statement would be "During the heating or feeding process, no single part of the bottle or food should ever be hotter than what you would give to your infant". Swirling the formula around to distribute the heat is ...


3

Babies eat. Babies eat a lot. Newborn babies eat a lot more than older babies. These are just the simple truths of raising children. Right now, your child has a very small stomach. They can't store as much food as we can and thus need to eat more often. Also, breast milk digests quickly, thus contributing to the need for more food, more often. This has ...


3

A few things are going to happen if they haven't already with your infant. First off, you're going to start feeding him solid foods. That will change some of his dependence on breastfeeding to 'feel full'. It won't happen immediately, but it will change as you feed him more. It also will allow you to ease him into a schedule, if you are careful; you can ...


3

Some suggestions you could explore- -Try another brand until you find one that works. A lot of people I know who breastfed and did bottle feeding had success with the Playtex bottles that have a disposable bag you put the milk in. I think the suction to the bag simulated the breast better perhaps? -There are corresponding ages for the flow speed so perhaps ...


3

I had the same problem and corrected it. Let me give you the insights I learned during this process and some things I tried to get the biting to stop, which it eventually did: The gums rise significantly before the teeth come out and affect the way a baby latches (to a bottle or breast). At 6 months the baby starts eating more solids, which means they need ...


3

I'm not an expert (we did BLW but not in a terribly organized manner), but I would tend to say, not very much. Baby-led weaning, from what I know, is mostly about teaching the baby to learn how to eat; and while feeders are nice to use for teething (which is what we used them for), they don't really teach the baby how to eat very well. To the extent that ...


3

Others have addressed dietary issues, I'll just comment on teeth and gums. There's nothing any worse for your kid's teeth and gums with chocolate (or any other sweet) than there is any other fermentable carbohydrate. It might take up residence in more places in her mouth than, say, bread would, but nothing about it will be worse than apple juice would be or ...


3

I remember being sick worried thinking why my lo wasn't eating at that age, but that was just a phase. We used to think he was the only child who doesn't like to eat, but after talking to friends and reading online, I found out many babies go through the same stage at that age. Other things I tried at the time and they worked were, change the timings of ...


2

If your child is on the small side, you were probably told to feed him often. Ours were both under 6 pounds, and our pediatrician wanted them fed every two hours until they hit 10 pounds. Man, that was a long 4 months or so for my wife! After that, we fed them on an their schedule, and that was still at least once a night until maybe seven or eight months. ...


2

I suggest a specific baby spoon. These are usually plastic or with a rubber coating. An adult metal spoon might hurt them if they flail, protest or bite down hard. That said, what is wrong with the bottle? Current advice is to leave weaning (onto solid foods) until after 6 months and if breast milk is not an option, the bottle seems like the best way to ...


2

I'm not quite sure I understand what you mean but this is what it made me think of: While googling for that image, I came across this one which looks like the thing I think you're requesting: I didni't think such a thing really existed, but hey, you can buy anything on Amazon! $6.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. I'm surprised.


2

It turns out that she was in the middle of a growth spurt and it (with a bit of overtiredness, she didn't nap too well around that time) seems to have been the cause. Three days later she mastered grabbing and holding toys and since the feeding problem has gone away on its own. Still, thank you for your answers.


2

I think she may be hungry when this happens, but it's not enough to fully wake her because she's swaddled. The swaddle helps babies sleep longer because it suppresses the startle reflex. Without the swaddle she probably would wake crying for food. Not to mention, a 3mo definitely should still be waking for night feedings especially if she's breastfed. ...


1

It sounds like she is ready for something more substantial/textural than just purees. With my son the nutrition specialist had us switch from purees to pastes, from pastes to disolvables, and then from disolvables to soft chewables. The specialist also said until a baby is on to chewables the progression is development based and nutrition should still come ...


1

In general: My first baby loved food. Spoon fed from 5 months, devoured anything. My second baby was not really interested in food until 11-12 months old. He is mostly interested when he can feed himself. In the end, babies are different, and start eating at different times, and there is no one 'right' approach. Not opening mouth: Does she maybe not ...


1

I would talk to your pediatrician about this. At around 2 months my son would not sleep for more than an hour at a time if he was swaddled. The pediatrician said some babies are like that and if we can maintain a good room temperature through the night then we should stop swaddling. If the rocking is a full body rock she might not like the swaddle, if it ...


1

Three months seems a good age for the baby to gradually stop being fed every few hours. I would not feed her unless she wakes and screams for food (or if I succumbed to pity;). That is, of course, if she has no digestive problems and is healthily developing and gaining mass. About that age my LO started sleeping for longer periods of time. You may be inside ...


1

I always considered a spoon to be the only "food feeder" a baby needs. Why have her learn to use a mesh bag unless that's what she'll use as a grown up? It doesn't make any sense to teach her to use one gadget (which is gross and really hard to clean, BTW) only to have to teach her to use another later. I think the most effective "food feeders" for babies ...


1

You should talk to your pediatrician because the answer can depend on your baby and how well she drinks on an ad-lib diet (she gets to decide when and how much to drink). When our baby was in the hospital (due to complications related to being a preemie), they would wake him up every 3 hours initially to feed him and then later changed that to 4 hours. He ...


1

Have you tried giving her some gripe water ? It is an excellent old remedy for colic, better known as wind. Sometimes babies have to be patted on the back for over half an hour ,gently to bring up wind because if it doesn't all come up the colic sits like a bubble in their belly and causes pain. Some babies are blessed with little or none whilst others are ...


1

When my son behaved in the same way, it turned out to be a candida infection in his mouth. This is very common in babies. I'm sure other people will have plenty of other ideas, but I just wanted to mention this possibility.


1

I think you may be overlooking the possibility of her beginning the teething stage. The most obvious way to get them sucking is to help them learn to enjoy a dummy. My almost 6 month old son has finally taken to the dummy after ~5 months of spitting it out. As a result I think he complains less and has gained stronger suckling power, making feeds quicker in ...


1

After some search I got this podee bottle feeder which seems to be something similar to what I was searching for. Also the picture I saw on in the manuals was this , and is called SNS generally used by adoptive mothers: The podee bottle feeder seems to be an interesting invention going by the reviews on amazon. Unfortunately this is not available in our ...


1

To answer your question: I can't imagine for a moment that anyone sells anything like that. I'm no doctor, but from my personal experience, an automatic drip milk dispenser doesn't approximate any biological function. Bottles are old technology yes. But that doesn't mean it's outdated or can be made 'more efficient'. Millions of years of trial and error ...


1

Plain lentils sounds pretty boring. We tried fresh fruit: mango, watermelon, kiwi fruit and banana – cut into pieces that she could hold in her hand. We allowed her to taste the food, but never required that she actually ate any. We had a constant watch on her, just in case she choked, and she sometimes did, but eventually she got the hang of eating. We ...


1

In American culture, it is unusual to wean a child from sucking at this early an age, but apparently in other cultures is is not uncommon to move to a spoon as early as 8 months as a transition to cup. Scientistst in Japan looked at three different spoon shapes which they evaluated for confusion with regard to lip position, spillage and choking. While none ...


1

I know this doesn't really address the question as asked. However, due to a conversation in chat with the poster as well as other simultaneously asked questions, here is the best answer I can offer at this time. There is a bit of a debate over when to wean baby entirely - in the US at least, but the standard is about one year to one and a half years here. ...


1

Extended periods of feeding is fairly normal at a newborn stage. Three-four hours of continuous feeding is not. If she is going on every 15 minutes with 15 minute breaks in between -- that's a growth spurt, it's normal, it'll pass. I imagine that even though she is sucking, she is not actually taking milk -- she might be latched incorrectly. I would highly ...



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