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22

Please do not read this answer as bashing your parenting style. I know from experience that it's easy to fall into a pattern of wanting your child to eat more or differently, and end up coercing them into doing so. My daughter was flagged as underweight by her doctors as a toddler, so as a family we have a long history of struggling with helping her eat well ...


11

A child will not starve itself. She is probably not eating because she is not hungry. Forcing her will only make it less enjoyable for her, imo. Ask her if she is hungry/if she wants to eat something at some points of the day. When she does, propose food you can give her, and follow her tastes. If she is hungry when you also are eating, propose to eat with ...


8

She's old enough to realize what eating is and that it is necessary. If she doesn't want to eat, don't make her. But make it clear that when she refuses, the next meal will be in, say, 3 hours. If that's her choice, stick to it. Don't give in by offering her something to eat in the meantime, don't let her fill up on sweets, etc., be strong and wait for the ...


5

Depending on the formula that you're using, they might have some probiotics in their composition. For example, Nestlé. Probiotics have small tolerance to high temperatures, so preparing the formula (or heating it after it was prepared) above some temperature might kill those probiotics, reducing the nutritional value of the formula. For example, this ...


4

You didn't answer our questions, so I'll give a rather general answer: For very young or premature babies, nursing can be quite exhausting. This may mean that they will actively "drink" for a short while, then take a small break ( nipple in mouth, sucking or not), then start over. Sometimes, they will even fall asleep during the meal. For breastfed babies, ...


4

It's certainly not illegal, it's just ill-advised. When it comes to your child's safety, is it really worth taking the risk? I believe a better statement would be "During the heating or feeding process, no single part of the bottle or food should ever be hotter than what you would give to your infant". Swirling the formula around to distribute the heat is ...


4

Good question, and I see where you would be concerned. First, I don't think the breast milk had anything to do with it, because formula fed babies are usually fatter, and you've got the opposite going here. Instead, it seems to be more about the exercise Sneha gets that Rose doesn't. If they eat the same amount of food, but Sneha burns it all off while ...


4

Noah & woliveirajr are both correct that there is some risk of reducing nutritional value, I'm sure. I will offer as counter point my home study (sample size=2) of children who were bottle-fed formula almost exclusively as infants; formula which was on occasion reheated in the microwave. They are now 12 and 9, healthy, and not malnourished. They ...


3

A few things are going to happen if they haven't already with your infant. First off, you're going to start feeding him solid foods. That will change some of his dependence on breastfeeding to 'feel full'. It won't happen immediately, but it will change as you feed him more. It also will allow you to ease him into a schedule, if you are careful; you can ...


3

Babies eat. Babies eat a lot. Newborn babies eat a lot more than older babies. These are just the simple truths of raising children. Right now, your child has a very small stomach. They can't store as much food as we can and thus need to eat more often. Also, breast milk digests quickly, thus contributing to the need for more food, more often. This has ...


3

I'm not an expert (we did BLW but not in a terribly organized manner), but I would tend to say, not very much. Baby-led weaning, from what I know, is mostly about teaching the baby to learn how to eat; and while feeders are nice to use for teething (which is what we used them for), they don't really teach the baby how to eat very well. To the extent that ...


3

I had the same problem and corrected it. Let me give you the insights I learned during this process and some things I tried to get the biting to stop, which it eventually did: The gums rise significantly before the teeth come out and affect the way a baby latches (to a bottle or breast). At 6 months the baby starts eating more solids, which means they need ...


3

Others have addressed dietary issues, I'll just comment on teeth and gums. There's nothing any worse for your kid's teeth and gums with chocolate (or any other sweet) than there is any other fermentable carbohydrate. It might take up residence in more places in her mouth than, say, bread would, but nothing about it will be worse than apple juice would be or ...


2

Our baby was full term but smaller than usual (5 lbs 6 oz, 4lbs 11 on discharge). The pediatrician advised us to feed her every 2 hours which we essentially did even through the night. (I breastfeed so this frequency also really boosted my supply.) Though most times she would ask to feed, there were times I had to wake her to feed without demand, in order to ...


2

If your child is on the small side, you were probably told to feed him often. Ours were both under 6 pounds, and our pediatrician wanted them fed every two hours until they hit 10 pounds. Man, that was a long 4 months or so for my wife! After that, we fed them on an their schedule, and that was still at least once a night until maybe seven or eight months. ...


2

** Let me say we have been to the specialists, therapists, doctors, etc. This answer is based on what I have to do when all the normal suggestions fail ** Oh man, you and me both. My 2 1/2 year old is doing the same things. Let me tell you what I've figured out myself. Most of it is a battle, and probably doesn't set up the best structure for meal time, but ...


2

We microwave our infants formula all the time, it's all we use to heat the formula. We always swirl and double-check the temp before feeding. I disagree with the losing nutritional value statement. I don't think that warming milk to 20 degrees celcius is considered "cooking" to anyone. There is a fine line in microwaving time to go from feeding temperature ...


2

So, answering myself in case someone else bumps into this. We found that it was more nipple-tongue placement. As new parents, we weren't super conscious of their tongues yet. Their tongue was blocking the hole in the nipple. As we placed the bottle in and out of their mouth, occasionally we'd get tongue blockage, occasionally free flow. Now we're aware of ...


2

Does she drink juice? When I drink juice, I often dilute it by adding an equal amount of water or more (I don't want the calories of all that juice, but I don't like the taste of our water). If she isn't used to sweet juices, she'll never miss it, and you will be adding fluids to her diet. Also, some people just don't like water. Some juices actually help ...


2

I think she may be hungry when this happens, but it's not enough to fully wake her because she's swaddled. The swaddle helps babies sleep longer because it suppresses the startle reflex. Without the swaddle she probably would wake crying for food. Not to mention, a 3mo definitely should still be waking for night feedings especially if she's breastfed. ...


1

Three months seems a good age for the baby to gradually stop being fed every few hours. I would not feed her unless she wakes and screams for food (or if I succumbed to pity;). That is, of course, if she has no digestive problems and is healthily developing and gaining mass. About that age my LO started sleeping for longer periods of time. You may be inside ...


1

It sounds like she is ready for something more substantial/textural than just purees. With my son the nutrition specialist had us switch from purees to pastes, from pastes to disolvables, and then from disolvables to soft chewables. The specialist also said until a baby is on to chewables the progression is development based and nutrition should still come ...


1

In general: My first baby loved food. Spoon fed from 5 months, devoured anything. My second baby was not really interested in food until 11-12 months old. He is mostly interested when he can feed himself. In the end, babies are different, and start eating at different times, and there is no one 'right' approach. Not opening mouth: Does she maybe not ...


1

I would talk to your pediatrician about this. At around 2 months my son would not sleep for more than an hour at a time if he was swaddled. The pediatrician said some babies are like that and if we can maintain a good room temperature through the night then we should stop swaddling. If the rocking is a full body rock she might not like the swaddle, if it ...


1

I always considered a spoon to be the only "food feeder" a baby needs. Why have her learn to use a mesh bag unless that's what she'll use as a grown up? It doesn't make any sense to teach her to use one gadget (which is gross and really hard to clean, BTW) only to have to teach her to use another later. I think the most effective "food feeders" for babies ...


1

You should talk to your pediatrician because the answer can depend on your baby and how well she drinks on an ad-lib diet (she gets to decide when and how much to drink). When our baby was in the hospital (due to complications related to being a preemie), they would wake him up every 3 hours initially to feed him and then later changed that to 4 hours. He ...


1

I think you may be overlooking the possibility of her beginning the teething stage. The most obvious way to get them sucking is to help them learn to enjoy a dummy. My almost 6 month old son has finally taken to the dummy after ~5 months of spitting it out. As a result I think he complains less and has gained stronger suckling power, making feeds quicker in ...


1

You actually might not have to wake to feed. Infants will sometimes be able to nurse even while they are sleeping. I would definitely ask your doctor at your 1 month checkup (make sure growth is on track). We had issues and were told to let ours drink as much as she wanted and then let her sleep as long as she wanted unless it was getting close to 5 hours. ...



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