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22

Please do not read this answer as bashing your parenting style. I know from experience that it's easy to fall into a pattern of wanting your child to eat more or differently, and end up coercing them into doing so. My daughter was flagged as underweight by her doctors as a toddler, so as a family we have a long history of struggling with helping her eat well ...


12

A child will not starve itself. She is probably not eating because she is not hungry. Forcing her will only make it less enjoyable for her, imo. Ask her if she is hungry/if she wants to eat something at some points of the day. When she does, propose food you can give her, and follow her tastes. If she is hungry when you also are eating, propose to eat with ...


8

She's old enough to realize what eating is and that it is necessary. If she doesn't want to eat, don't make her. But make it clear that when she refuses, the next meal will be in, say, 3 hours. If that's her choice, stick to it. Don't give in by offering her something to eat in the meantime, don't let her fill up on sweets, etc., be strong and wait for the ...


7

First and foremost, a 2 month old should not be losing weight, speak to a healthcare professional (midwife, doctor or both). To answer your question, properly formulated stage 1 formula milk is suitable from birth, but it's best to discuss this with your doctor or midwife as there might be other things you want to try. And something else to think about, ...


5

You didn't answer our questions, so I'll give a rather general answer: For very young or premature babies, nursing can be quite exhausting. This may mean that they will actively "drink" for a short while, then take a small break ( nipple in mouth, sucking or not), then start over. Sometimes, they will even fall asleep during the meal. For breastfed babies, ...


4

For completeness, our baby was scheduled for a Continuous feed NGT tube, the tube from her nose to her stomach. Then was to be a slow drip feed, the equivalent of her normal feeding oz/per bottle feed now oz/hour. The advantage to this, for her, was no big bump of food at any given time, so no chance of a big dose of reflux. The bad news, you have a tube ...


4

Good question, and I see where you would be concerned. First, I don't think the breast milk had anything to do with it, because formula fed babies are usually fatter, and you've got the opposite going here. Instead, it seems to be more about the exercise Sneha gets that Rose doesn't. If they eat the same amount of food, but Sneha burns it all off while ...


4

Children at six months can be taught sign language, and asking for food and drink is usually the easiest thing to teach them. Sign language for babies is easy to learn because it involves logical motions and simple ones. Asking for food is moving hand toward face as if you have food in it. Asking for more is bringing hands together with fingers touching. ...


2

So, answering myself in case someone else bumps into this. We found that it was more nipple-tongue placement. As new parents, we weren't super conscious of their tongues yet. Their tongue was blocking the hole in the nipple. As we placed the bottle in and out of their mouth, occasionally we'd get tongue blockage, occasionally free flow. Now we're aware of ...


2

We microwave our infants formula all the time, it's all we use to heat the formula. We always swirl and double-check the temp before feeding. I disagree with the losing nutritional value statement. I don't think that warming milk to 20 degrees celcius is considered "cooking" to anyone. There is a fine line in microwaving time to go from feeding temperature ...


2

Does she drink juice? When I drink juice, I often dilute it by adding an equal amount of water or more (I don't want the calories of all that juice, but I don't like the taste of our water). If she isn't used to sweet juices, she'll never miss it, and you will be adding fluids to her diet. Also, some people just don't like water. Some juices actually help ...


2

Our baby was full term but smaller than usual (5 lbs 6 oz, 4lbs 11 on discharge). The pediatrician advised us to feed her every 2 hours which we essentially did even through the night. (I breastfeed so this frequency also really boosted my supply.) Though most times she would ask to feed, there were times I had to wake her to feed without demand, in order to ...


2

I think she may be hungry when this happens, but it's not enough to fully wake her because she's swaddled. The swaddle helps babies sleep longer because it suppresses the startle reflex. Without the swaddle she probably would wake crying for food. Not to mention, a 3mo definitely should still be waking for night feedings especially if she's breastfed. ...


2

If your child is on the small side, you were probably told to feed him often. Ours were both under 6 pounds, and our pediatrician wanted them fed every two hours until they hit 10 pounds. Man, that was a long 4 months or so for my wife! After that, we fed them on an their schedule, and that was still at least once a night until maybe seven or eight months. ...


2

I had this problem as my little one had poor suction anyway, especially when he was teething. Chewing is soothing to sore gums. Rather than putting the bottle in baby's mouth, I put it to his lips so he had to suck it in. I would also stroke his chin at the same time. However, this only works if baby is hungry. As he was feeding, if he began to chew, I ...


2

** Let me say we have been to the specialists, therapists, doctors, etc. This answer is based on what I have to do when all the normal suggestions fail ** Oh man, you and me both. My 2 1/2 year old is doing the same things. Let me tell you what I've figured out myself. Most of it is a battle, and probably doesn't set up the best structure for meal time, but ...


1

My son is 6 months and didn't stop his night feedings until 5 months. He is 16 lbs now was 6 lbs when he was born. I bathe him and put him to bed no later than 8:30. If he does wake up I put his binky in his mouth and he falls right back to sleep. That's how I broke his night feedings.


1

You actually might not have to wake to feed. Infants will sometimes be able to nurse even while they are sleeping. I would definitely ask your doctor at your 1 month checkup (make sure growth is on track). We had issues and were told to let ours drink as much as she wanted and then let her sleep as long as she wanted unless it was getting close to 5 hours. ...


1

I personally would not recommend waking your baby up for any reason. When your baby is ready to eat he will let you know. There is no reason to wake him and and force him to eat. The only exception I would say would be a newborn who hasn't eaten yet. Since your baby is two weeks old, I would let him rest as long as he needs to and feed him when he wakes ...


1

It sounds like she is ready for something more substantial/textural than just purees. With my son the nutrition specialist had us switch from purees to pastes, from pastes to disolvables, and then from disolvables to soft chewables. The specialist also said until a baby is on to chewables the progression is development based and nutrition should still come ...


1

I would talk to your pediatrician about this. At around 2 months my son would not sleep for more than an hour at a time if he was swaddled. The pediatrician said some babies are like that and if we can maintain a good room temperature through the night then we should stop swaddling. If the rocking is a full body rock she might not like the swaddle, if it ...


1

In general: My first baby loved food. Spoon fed from 5 months, devoured anything. My second baby was not really interested in food until 11-12 months old. He is mostly interested when he can feed himself. In the end, babies are different, and start eating at different times, and there is no one 'right' approach. Not opening mouth: Does she maybe not ...



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