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6

First: don't worry! The fact that he chokes is scary, but it also shows that his body reacts to speed of the milk. My daughter had a similar issue (the milk came to fast for her to handle properly). We used the following tricks to great effect: Breastfeeding: use a Nipple shield. This enabled her to latch on and drink comfortably. Bottle: we switched to ...


5

See WebMD: In the old days when water supplies were not reliably clean, it made sense to sterilize baby bottles. But now, sterilizing bottles, nipples, and water is mostly unnecessary. Unless your water supply is suspected to harbor contaminated bacteria, it is as safe for your baby as it is for you. There is no reason to sterilize what is ...


4

We have a 13 month old son who has a genetic condition that led him to having failure to thrive. He's been on an NG tube since 6 months old, so we understand how much of a pain it is to have one. Unfortunately, I don't think there is an easy answer, or one answer that works for everyone. Our OTs have said that we focus on making eating pleasurable and fun, ...


4

I am not a doctor, but my understanding is that reflux does resolve itself over time. The problem is often that the valve between the esophagus and stomach is underdeveloped, and can't keep the stomach acid out of the esophagus. Once the child matures and that valve has a chance to fully develop, the problem often resolves itself. In the meantime, though, ...


4

He may just not be ready. It takes a lot of muscles and coordination to swallow, especially if you have to get the stuff from the front of your mouth to the back, and kids learn how at different ages. At 7 months, I don't think there's anything to worry about. I'd start meals with breastmilk or formula, then offer solid or semi-solid foods, and then wrap up ...


3

I strongly suggest that you reverse the feeding order: What motivation is there to struggle with something new (many babies are hesitant to try new tastes or textures), if she's already (semi-)full? In general, following Ellyn Sattler's "Division of Responsibility" is a viable approach, meaning at your stage you offer the food you deem appropriate, she ...


3

The earliest recommended age for weaning is 4 months, and as you cannot feed him milk, there is no reason not to start on solid foods. Mashed up, or puréed fruits or vegetables - banana, apple, pear, carrot, potato, parsnip etc. These are very simple first foods, and while they are messy, babies rapidly learn how to eat them. Once they are happily eating ...


3

My daughter had extremely bad reflux as an infant, and eventually had to go on medication. Before we moved to that step, our doctor had us try several things to help her: Smaller, more frequent feedings. Less volume in the stomach, less likely to overflow and force stomach acid back up the esophagus. Feed in an upright position. Burp more frequently ...


3

As explained by Gruber's answer, sterilizing the bottles is usually completely unnecessary. However, there is a risk of buildup of harmful germs if the bottles are left to stand for too long with (rests of) milk inside. So while sterilizing is probably not required, you should wash them regularly and thoroughly, and refrigerate the milk as soon as possible. ...


3

Some old rule I remember some old person telling me was to boil all the stuff in hot water every week but only on saturdays. In my local language saturday is cleaning day. The other days the stuff would just get cleaning like the other dining utensils. But if the doctor has advised other treatment, than that should be followed. A way to sanitize sensitive ...


2

Wow, this sounds like a really tough situation. My daughter has never had much of an appetite and it is often a struggle to get her to eat (forget getting her to eat anything she doesn't like). Does your daughter like to go new places? Sometimes when we would put my daughter in a stroller or car seat and take her places she would eat (almost ...


2

My daughter had a similar behavior, which was due (in her case) by colic (not sure if this is the right way to say it, english is not my native language). I am not saying that this is the case for your child, but it could be worth prospecting. What was happening to my daughter (at least how I understood it) was that feeding her calmed the pains, which would ...


2

Stephie is right, reverse the feeding order. Hunger is powerful. Keep the pouch and other favored items out of sight and start with the more solid stuff first. To be honest I wouldn't worry about it too much, but if you want to play hardball, make it seem like there's nothing else. Make feeding time over, and come back to it in 10mins. (10min is an ...


1

You did it very well by changing the pattern in feeding, it is just that the baby is still used to be fed quite often. From what you comment, your baby used to eat several times during the night, say every 3-4 hours. Now he sleeps for 8 hours in a row and then wakes up feeling hungry: that is completely normal! Just feed him normally at that time for a ...


1

On the advice of our pediatrician, we started giving our kids solid foods after 6 months. When she told us how to do this, she indicated that the quantity of solid foods wasn't particularly important, because the baby was still getting its primary nutritional needs met by the breast milk (in your case, formula). Our kids weaned on their own anywhere between ...


1

When we first started our children on semi-solids, my wife expressed some breast milk and mixed this in. It worked extremely well. It has a familiar taste then, so they know what to do with it.


1

Something I've always done with my little one is to say the word "Chew!" in between making over emphasised chewing motions with my mouth, and then "Swallow!" and making a big gulping swallow so he can see my neck moving. It often amuses him as if it's a bit of a game but does seem to work as it shows by example. Also it helps if he's choking a little bit ...


1

I've tried all the above with my little guy. One day I tried something new: I laid him on his back (try to get baby to relax if you can, it works much better) and I took his knee and crossed it over to his elbow. Left knee right elbow, right knee left elbow. Works every time. The farts come right out, it's amazing.


1

As it is a very trendy matter nowadays, I would also explore lactose intolerance as a possible cause of this. it may be that your child quickly gets under the impression she's done while it's just intolerance causing this. Therefore she quickly gets hungry, and so on... You can probably easily check this by testing soya milk for 1 or 2 feedings and see if ...



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