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15

A diet high in sugar can have an adverse affect on development. Virtually anything can have an adverse effect on development depending on who you talk to. Feeding your child too much or too little, letting them sleep too much or too little or go to sleep too early or late, switching toward mushy foods and then solids too soon or late, beginning to discipline ...


8

Your son may have dysphagia, a feeding and swallowing disorder. While there may be physical problems that need to be addressed, generally the disorder is treated with physical therapy designed to strengthen the muscles involved and train the mouth and throat to function properly. The linked article from the American Speech Language and Hearing Association ...


5

A six month old can sleep up to eight hours without feeding. We had the issue that I had to work (+ commute) while breastfeeding and was getting utterly exhausted by having to wake up for night-time feeds. A pediatrician told us that our then six-month-old son is asking for his night-time bottles because of the comfort and company and not out of hunger. We ...


5

I think you can talk to your child at any time, keeping in mind that it may be distraction, especially when it is time to go to sleep. During breast-feeding, the child will be focussed on feeding, and will generally be in a quite relaxed state. Talking gently during this time is likely to be good for the bond with the child, but it could also be ...


3

A few things are going to happen if they haven't already with your infant. First off, you're going to start feeding him solid foods. That will change some of his dependence on breastfeeding to 'feel full'. It won't happen immediately, but it will change as you feed him more. It also will allow you to ease him into a schedule, if you are careful; you can ...


3

I'm not an expert (we did BLW but not in a terribly organized manner), but I would tend to say, not very much. Baby-led weaning, from what I know, is mostly about teaching the baby to learn how to eat; and while feeders are nice to use for teething (which is what we used them for), they don't really teach the baby how to eat very well. To the extent that ...


3

First, to be clear, I am ABSOLUTELY NOT diagnosing anything! I have nowhere near enough information to have anything more than a suspicion. Even that suspicion is tenuous at best. In no way should you take my words over the internet as anything other than general information, and you should see a professional for an appropriate evaluation for your child. ...


3

I remember being sick worried thinking why my lo wasn't eating at that age, but that was just a phase. We used to think he was the only child who doesn't like to eat, but after talking to friends and reading online, I found out many babies go through the same stage at that age. Other things I tried at the time and they worked were, change the timings of ...


2

My 13-month-old is currently on cow's milk (whole, and hormone-free) and mashed/soft foods, and we try to give her a dinner at about 7:00, followed by a few more hours of playtime, and then a story and/or bath and a big bottle of warm milk just before bed at about 10. My wife, who loves to sleep in, then tries not to have her wake up before 9; if she ...


2

According to Marc Weissbluth, a pediatrician who has written books on sleep in infants and children and fussiness in infants, most babies are able to sleep through the night without a feeding at 9 months of age. I have seen anecdotally from mothers that for some it may take as long as 12 months of age before a child is eating enough filling food during the ...


2

Here's some helpful information from the Livestrong Foundation: Causes of Slowed Appetite If your baby's suddenly eating less but seems to still be healthy and interested in eating, he’s likely just going through a healthy slow phase. In a baby 4 to 7 months old, eating less can also indicate he’s beginning teething. If you think his teeth are ...


2

Whether you should wake a sleeping newborn for feedings depends on the baby's age, weight and overall health. Most newborns lose weight in the first few days after birth. Until your newborn regains this lost weight — usually within one to two weeks after birth — it's important to feed him or her frequently. This might mean occasionally waking your baby for ...


2

I'm not quite sure I understand what you mean but this is what it made me think of: While googling for that image, I came across this one which looks like the thing I think you're requesting: I didni't think such a thing really existed, but hey, you can buy anything on Amazon! $6.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. I'm surprised.


2

Some suggestions you could explore- -Try another brand until you find one that works. A lot of people I know who breastfed and did bottle feeding had success with the Playtex bottles that have a disposable bag you put the milk in. I think the suction to the bag simulated the breast better perhaps? -There are corresponding ages for the flow speed so perhaps ...


2

It turns out that she was in the middle of a growth spurt and it (with a bit of overtiredness, she didn't nap too well around that time) seems to have been the cause. Three days later she mastered grabbing and holding toys and since the feeding problem has gone away on its own. Still, thank you for your answers.


2

The problem of tooth decay is not so much regular feedings with the bottle itself, but the habit of the baby going to sleep while eating or drinking something with sugar in it and having that sugary liquid sit in the mouth for hours at a time. I would think trying to feed a 1 month old with a spoon would be nearly impossible. Spoon feeding starts with ...


1

I always considered a spoon to be the only "food feeder" a baby needs. Why have her learn to use a mesh bag unless that's what she'll use as a grown up? It doesn't make any sense to teach her to use one gadget (which is gross and really hard to clean, BTW) only to have to teach her to use another later. I think the most effective "food feeders" for babies ...


1

Have you tried giving her some gripe water ? It is an excellent old remedy for colic, better known as wind. Sometimes babies have to be patted on the back for over half an hour ,gently to bring up wind because if it doesn't all come up the colic sits like a bubble in their belly and causes pain. Some babies are blessed with little or none whilst others are ...


1

After some search I got this podee bottle feeder which seems to be something similar to what I was searching for. Also the picture I saw on in the manuals was this , and is called SNS generally used by adoptive mothers: The podee bottle feeder seems to be an interesting invention going by the reviews on amazon. Unfortunately this is not available in our ...


1

To answer your question: I can't imagine for a moment that anyone sells anything like that. I'm no doctor, but from my personal experience, an automatic drip milk dispenser doesn't approximate any biological function. Bottles are old technology yes. But that doesn't mean it's outdated or can be made 'more efficient'. Millions of years of trial and error ...


1

Plain lentils sounds pretty boring. We tried fresh fruit: mango, watermelon, kiwi fruit and banana – cut into pieces that she could hold in her hand. We allowed her to taste the food, but never required that she actually ate any. We had a constant watch on her, just in case she choked, and she sometimes did, but eventually she got the hang of eating. We ...


1

In American culture, it is unusual to wean a child from sucking at this early an age, but apparently in other cultures is is not uncommon to move to a spoon as early as 8 months as a transition to cup. Scientistst in Japan looked at three different spoon shapes which they evaluated for confusion with regard to lip position, spillage and choking. While none ...


1

I suggest a specific baby spoon. These are usually plastic or with a rubber coating. An adult metal spoon might hurt them if they flail, protest or bite down hard. That said, what is wrong with the bottle? Current advice is to leave weaning (onto solid foods) until after 6 months and if breast milk is not an option, the bottle seems like the best way to ...


1

Extended periods of feeding is fairly normal at a newborn stage. Three-four hours of continuous feeding is not. If she is going on every 15 minutes with 15 minute breaks in between -- that's a growth spurt, it's normal, it'll pass. I imagine that even though she is sucking, she is not actually taking milk -- she might be latched incorrectly. I would highly ...



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