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3

I have a bit of a different approach than that of @Valkyrie, and want to add that the answer depends on your parenting philosophy. I do wholeheartedly agree with asking her! I don't know why your daughter developed a sudden fear of water. I presume she was accustomed to salt water before, and that her swim lessons are in chlorinated water? Maybe that's what ...


3

Keep taking her to swim, and don't let her see your distress at HER distress. She could misinterpret that as "OMG Mommy is scared of the water too I was RIGHT!" as opposed to the more correct "Mommy is sad that I'm scared." What worked for us, when our daughter was INSANELY FREAKED by water, was repetition and calmness. We took her to lessons as usual, ...


13

That particular irrational fear is common. Take her fears seriously, because they're real to her. Explaining that they are unfounded doesn't work, nor does smiling at or dismissing her fears. If you're reassuring and comforting, she'll learn one more reason to trust you with her feelings (really important) and that it's okay to feel afraid. Then you can work ...


0

My toddler is much younger, but I still take similar approach of explaining things to him. I try to explain everything I can to him (at this stage, it's helping to expand his vocabulary and understand of language.) I always try to explain things to children in a context they can understand, without condescending to them because of their age. You offered: ...


2

Our six year old daughter put on a Darth Vader costume, with mask, early in the month, and it completely freaked our two year old son out. She'd lift the mask up and he'd be fine, she'd put it down and he'd freak out again. We talked about how it was really her under there, and she was just pretending, but he had none of it. After a few minutes of this, ...


3

my style has been to explain that there's really no such thing as ghosts or monsters, they're just stories and toys I think you're already doing it right. My wife's preference is to not even bother with theory, and just frame things in practical ways he understands: "The ghost lives in the shop with his ghost friends. It doesn't like sunlight and ...


0

When we make scary things fun, they're no so scary any more. So we have a big party and learn to not be scared and eat candy.


3

My oldest child was 4 the first time she went trick or treating. When she was 3, she stayed in with me and gave out the candy. She got the leftovers from the bowl when it is over. That was enough excitement for her and got her used to the idea. The next year, she went out with her younger brother (with Dad as escort). I never took my kids into those ...


4

Three year olds are definitely old enough to understand 'real' versus 'imaginary/pretend'. My three year old has nightmares where a plane flies into his room fairly regularly; after the first few, I explained to him that it wasn't real, because a real plane can't fit in his room, and he clearly understands that now. Still has nightmares, but has a very ...


19

(What is it with toddlers and hot air balloons? Mine can't stand them either -- I think the floating blows his mind... what's holding it up in the air?!?) We frame the holiday in terms of playing pretend: "you get to dress-up and pretend you are something else!" I try to only have mildly scary things around, and also teach him it can be fun to be a little ...


-2

I am a 49 year-old male and prefer to sleep with another person (was married 21 years), but when no one is there, I often hold a pillow or blanket, or place one behind my back. I had two stated reasons for getting married and one of them was to be allowed to sleep with someone. (You can guess at the other.) I feel that sleeping alone is not normal, and ...


1

I guess its normal. Even.when i was a teen, I used to keep my pillow next to me and used to sleep by hugging it. But mostly it was to reduce my anxiety and provide comfort. Yeah.. So its normal ( hopefully, oe else I am not normal lol)



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