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5

in other circumstances, I feel compelled to tell him, "Zombies are not real, your brother is just trying to scare you, it's time to go to bed." Second part first. Yes, you should try to convince him that zombies aren't real, but it probably won't take. It certainly doesn't hurt to try. It doesn't matter what he's afraid of (the monster under my bed ...


1

I don't think there's an issue with pretending to hunt something that doesn't exist. You could pretend to be a wizard hunting dragons, for example. Tell him that people made up the idea of zombies, like other scary things, because they like the shivery feeling of being scared when they're actually perfectly safe -- and also because it can be fun to go ...


0

I was worried about 'ghosts', in stories and Halloween, with my boys. I'd rather have completely avoided it, so these silly ideas would stop persisting in our culture and scaring sensitive kids (although in hindsight they may serve some kind of playful-toughening purpose). Ghosts came up in Curious George and Thomas etc, so I focused on it being more ...


4

I'm not sure that telling him that they aren't real is going to make him feel any better, because to him it is scary and might as well be real. The best thing you can do for him is help him feel empowered against the zombies. Let him know that you will always protect him from zombies and that he doesn't have to worry. As long as you are around he will be ...


7

I think this depends on the child. For my older son (also 3, and recently went through a Ghosts stage), who's fairly intelligent and straightforward, I would approach this intellectually. I would certainly not be inconsistent about it, whatever you do. If you're alternating "playing zombie" with "zombies aren't real", you're going to confuse him; while ...


2

I used to be afraid of a boogey man in my closet as a kid, and even sort of into my teens. When I figured out that 'the boogey man' was my mind assigning something tangible to an intangible fear, the fear of the boogey man went away. The 'boogey man' in my closet was actually the deep seated fear in my subconscious of my father, who was prone to enraged ...


1

Away from the rational answers, he may be sensitive. Teens are usually much more perceptive, the noises and things he feels may be real, for a certain sense of real. So, the question may be wether to accept the things around him as real and not fear them, or pretend they don’t exist till he doesn’t hear/feel them anymore. Quote: “every time a child ...



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