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7

TL;DR: whenever they're ready, and when you do let them view it, watch it with them and help them find different ways to think about and address the more qustionable/uncomfortable themes. Longer, more nuanced answer: Honestly, the age when they're ready for it depends on the child. My daughter wasn't able to grok anything other than 10-15 minutes of a ...


6

My daughter had a lot of fun at 2, but my son wasn't able to handle it well at the same age. For him, Disney at age 5 was the best thing ever.


6

We haven't been to a Disney park, but we have experienced the Moomin World (in Finland) with our girls first time when they were 5.5 and 4, and it worked out perfectly. We could see they had a magical experience. I would say that children below 3-4 usually get tired too quickly to get much out of such a day trip, and sometime around 7 the magical era is ...


6

It really depends entirely on the child. As for: what to do if they are bored after 5 minutes Leave. Be prepared to NOT make it through the entire film and be OK leaving early if need be. That takes a lot of stress out of the whole process.


6

It really depends on the movie. Our 3 year old loved Cars since he was 2, and was happily watching Planes at 3. He was not interested in Horton Hears a Who - too much dialogue even if the content is age appropriate in my opinion. I would wait a bit with letting him watch The Lion King (too scary) and Bambi (VERY scary). I recommend the site ...


3

If you must have separate viewing your simplest bet its to buy two DVD players. Your youngest should probably have a headrest screen, controlled from the front seat, but the elder one could cope just add easily with a laptop version. Also, when considering sound, your 6 year old should manage headphones but at 3, some do and some don't. Either way, ensure ...


3

A couple quick things to get out of the way Just like every "what is the appropriate age" question, there isn't one. Age is a pretty decent approximation of the physical and emotional maturity of people, but its margin of error is very high. While some things have laws that put lower bounds on them (drinking, violent movies, staying home alone) the truth is ...


3

My kids all did fine from about the age of 3. The only real way to know which movie to pick is by seeing what they like at home. My kids all have wildly different taste in movies, so usually I take them one at a time. Sometimes they get bored during exposition, but just require a quiet reminder from me. You can't really judge it by how much they sit ...


3

We bought our daughter twice to Hong Kong Disneyland, when she was 5 and 7. She cannot remember her first trip anymore, but can still remember the second trip fondly. (She's now 9.) Different children matures differently, but my daughter refused to go into Frontierland at 5 because it was decorated with the Pirates of Caribbean theme then. She was also very ...


2

My (then) three year old daughter loved watching the Wiggles on tv (and video - over and over and over!) so we thought a trip to see their live stage show would be a good treat. Wrong! She was terrified of the life-size costumes (Henry, Dorothy) to the point where I took her out. We peeked back in the door when it was just the Wiggles (people) onstage, ...


2

I saw Fantasia at around 4 or 5. Can't remember that exact age, but I still remember seeing it. If all you're looking for is that your child "sits quietly", my kids sat quietly through a movie at 2 and 3. if you want a "take home" value I think 4 or 5 is a good age.


2

It depends on the child, the film, and quite a bit of pure chance. My son, who is now nearly four, although he loves Disney films, still finds aspects of many of them scary. Until a few months ago he found the climax of Frozen very scary, but enjoyed the rest of the film. Tangled, which I'd personally rate roughly equally with Frozen on the scariness scale, ...


2

I know I'm responding to this way late, but I have a different (and, in Torben's word, thorough) answer for you. ;-) Disney in particular actually has two "lands" that cater to younger ages and such a variety of rides that it really is fitting for almost any age. Between 2-4 fantasyland and (3-7) toon town are specifically geared for younger ages and if a ...


2

It depends on your child. My kids just love Disney films such as Cars, Dumbo, Robin Hood and Jungle Book, but if Malificent The Witch was the greeter at Disneyworld, they'd freak out and have nightmares for a week - there was one in our Disney store once and that scared the hell out of me.


2

This varies so much from child to child I'm not sure their is a useful answer other than just to try them. In a worst case you will have wasted a few pounds/dollars/euro etc and have to leave early. My eldest enjoyed films from about 4, but my middle daughter was not a fan until she was about 6. I remember taking her about her fifth birthday and she ...


1

What age can you expect a child to happily sit through a movie It depends on how much media consumption they've been trained to handle. My 3½ year old watches about five minutes of TV per day, just one episode of Barbapapa before bed. He wouldn't last long in a cinema. On the other hand, some pre-schoolers spend between one and three hours per day in ...


1

It is actually possible to NOT require viewing of anything for both of these kids. I've done it (and probably so did your parents with you). You might take the above suggestions for after dark or a short time. But you might also try a number of other ideas. First, I would get a seat belt Pillow. I just found out about these this spring and will be ...


1

On long car trips we have used a laptop, with stacked headphone splitters so that each child can have their own sound. Now I just have two children share my laptop and one uses my iPad, while the fourth child and my wife often share a second iPad.


1

How about double iPads/iPods? Might be cheaper than an actual embedded DVD player, and once you have the dvd's in iTunes then you don't have to worry about losing the disks. You can also take them into restaurants to get the kids to sit down and chill out if you're just at the end of your rope and can't manage wrangling both of them.



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