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14

What I have found most effective is to teach them a coping mechanism, something active to do so they don't feel helpless, and give them plenty of time to employ it. For example: Okay, some water is coming. Close your eyes and mouth tightly so it won't get in! Kids often cry because they're scared of water getting in their mouth, which sort of creates ...


9

We cured the same problem in my daughter, INSTANTLY, with a cheap pair of swimming goggles. I showed her what they were, what they are for - she pressed them to her face, and that was it. no going back! The same pair got her used to jumping in a swimming pool, and to learn to swim. Now she's nine years old, and an experienced scuba diver!


4

First, to answer the general question ... NO. There is really no way that a 4/5/6 year old can understand why these kinds of things are happening. Just reassure that she is not disappointing you, that you love her, and be relentlessly positive. More specifically to your case .. there is no way around her feeling like she has done failed or something wrong. ...


3

Every child is different, and the suggestions already posted are good ones. I would suggest one idea that I didn't see posted yet, which is to alternate between a bath and a shower with the drain open. My kids get somewhat fearful when the water is being poured from a cup or bowl, but for whatever reason they think the shower is funny. I started with just ...


3

I don't know if this will help you, but I found a study published online from January 2011 for the Raikes Foundation entitled "Social-Emotional Learning Assessment Measures for Middle School Youth". I know it seems to focus primarily on middle school ages, but it seems to have some information in it that talks a little bit about social-emotional assessment ...


3

So... I've been thinking about this question for a few days, and here's the best I can come up with (and since it's been almost a month, none of this may apply to you anymore): I think a certain level of push-back from your daughter is to be expected. Especially if her friends are at the big kids school and whatnot. I think the only thing you can really ...


3

With my oldest son, the problem was primarily the shampoo in the eyes (or the unsalinated water, but more often the shampoo specifically). What we do is keep his towel at hand, and as soon as we've poured water over his hair, he takes the towel and dries his eyes. This gives him some sense of control (similar to Thorin's mask idea). We also use a ...


3

This worked for my son: I let him wear a swim mask, and put his hand over his mouth when I washed his hair. Then, I let him hold the washcloth while I washed his face. Knowing he could pull the cloth away at any time helped him deal with having his face washed.


2

It's sometimes better to use a "Monkey see, Monkey do" approach; I'm not sure if you have tried getting in the bath with her, and showing her that nothing happens to you when water goes over your face. My mom remembers that I used to have a terrible fear of water for a while, owing to an incident where I accidentally fell into the pool while playing tag, but ...


1

Great answers! My 2 years old daughter has a love/hate relationship with water, and she specially dislikes water pouring over her nose or mouth, which happened each time we washed her hair. What has worked of us is -as suggested by others- letting her take more control of the whole process, for instance, allowing her to pour water on herself with a toy ...



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