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11

My nine year old boy constantly had soap in his hair after showering, despite being in there long enough to rinse Chewbacca (of Star Wars fame) thoroughly. We installed a hand held shower head (so he could get it right up close to his head,) and it solved the problem. This might work for you too, since your daughter will be able have enough control to rinse ...


6

The next time he does that, remove him from the situation (eg leave the classroom and go into the hall; leave the hall and go outside; whatever.) As a parent, nobody will challenge you doing this; just say "Excuse us for a moment," and to the child say "Come out here with me for a moment." When you get out of earshot of everyone, stay calm and say: That ...


6

I live in Texas - much empathy! When we moved here our children were in middle school, and one of the first things my children's new friends asked was "What religion are you?" They had never encountered this before, but here in Texas many families, including children, identify heavily with a particular religion, most often a Christian religion. There were ...


5

Since she is asking, this may be a good opportunity to discuss with her the mechanics of human reproduction in detail: naming the body parts properly and explaining their functions in the process. You can also discuss with here what Auntie did wrong and how this could have been avoided. At this age kids a very non-sexual, so this may actually turn out to ...


5

First of all, recognize that the refusal itself wasn't inappropriate, just the manner of the refusal. It's okay for people to not want to actively participate in activities that are contrary to their beliefs, whatever the source of those beliefs. religious or secular. Jesus actually faced similar criticism many times. Just look for any stories mentioning ...


4

Perhaps cleaning her hair without shampoo is a better match for her. There are many resources detailing methods to go "shampoo-free". Some involve water only, others involve a small amount of baking soda or other ingredients. In general, it takes about 2-6 weeks to make the transition, so good to make the change over a school break or other time period where ...


4

I'm glad you asked this question as my 4-year-old has started spending more time in the kitchen with me (though mostly he just wants to lick the cake batter bowl). So...of course I went to do some research. The What's Cooking with Kids website has some excellent suggestions on how to ease kids into chopping and there are some excellent alternative chopping ...


3

I had a convo with my elementary kids about this a couple yrs ago. I explained the difference between foods we eat; there's Cake, Kibble and Crap. Simply put nobody likes Crap. Crap is different person to person. But you can't figure out what the Crap is without trying things. Everyone loves Cake. But you can't survive on Cake. So between Cakes you eat ...


2

If punishments are not working, switch things around and offer rewards for doing the right thing. If she completes the task, she gets X reward. If she completes it quickly, she gets something better. If it's not done at all, then the standard punishments will be applied. For example... If you tidy your room, you can stay up a little later tonight. If ...


2

I think she is old enough for a little transparency on your part. With a toddler, I would deal with stalling over shoes and the like by saying "if we get out the door quickly enough, there is time to stop at the park. If you use all that time up getting ready, there isn't." It was immediate and on-the-spot and usually worked. But your child can tell the time ...


2

One thing school nutrition programs often do is have "food tasting parties" to normalize the experience. So, you could get foods that even you haven't tried before and turn it into a family ritual. It could involve going to a restaraunt but I think it'd be more fun to investigate together how people cook/serve it, the cutlural relevance, etc. Then, when ...


2

Yes, she's probably ready. I think the most important criterion in deciding whether or not to try learning to use a knife is willingness to follow directions. If she's not listening to and obeying every word you say, no knife practice, period. That and sufficient gross motor and fine motor skills to control the knife would be important. If she can handle ...


2

Don't have her wash her hair in the shower. Wash it at the sink or using a bowl instead, like at the hairdresser's. That way, your daughter can be fully clothed, or at least enough to respect her privacy. You could even make it a game, playing hairdresser, washing each others hair. By washing yours, she can see how much and how thorough she needs to rinse ...


1

Karl Bielefeldt's answer is fantastic, but I would also consider the possibility that perhaps your boy is engaging in attention-getting behavior. You mentioned that he is fantastic at home with a special needs and two-year-old sibling. You also said he has previously been getting good grades and judging by your post I'm assuming he's been well behaved up ...


1

My son was having similar issues, but in his case they were pretty much from his very first day in school. The fact that your son started after changing schools is hopeful. The rushing through and the clowning around are often signs of boredom. Perhaps his previous school already covered certain topics. Perhaps they are moving at too slow of a pace. ...


1

We let ours start to chop from about four years old, but to keep things safe we bought a safety knife for them, which is serrated but very blunt, with a rounded end. The serrations will allow the cutting of most vegetables, although tomatoes may just squash. It works perfectly for peppers and carrots. We also found a safe peeler for carrots that reduces ...



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