Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

I don't have a better answer than the others for preventing younger children from touching electrical plugs, but I do know what helped curb any further play for us at age 4 - When I felt our child had sufficient coordination, I walked him through the proper way to plug in / unplug electrical plugs, using an unplugged outlet strip for safe practice. For ...


7

There are two general strategies I know of: Out of sight, out of mind Try to make the outlets and power-bars inaccessible. Move them out of sight, use coverlets to prevent the sockets from being exposed, hide them where the toddler can't reach them. This will likely not prevent eventual contact, but it might prevent it for long enough. Get power bars which ...


7

Flipping the power switch on a outlet or power strip isn't dangerous unless it's broken. What is dangerous is sticking things into the socket. So make sure all your plugs and outlets are whole, sits well in the wall with no hole between the outlet and wall, and that all your power strips are in good nick and if possible, use child safe models of sockets. ...


6

I was talking with my wife about this one, and it's tough. I know how obsessive and persistent toddlers can be about things like this, and if they get obsessed with something dangerous.. Unfortunately, I think sometimes you simply have to wait for your toddler to grow out of a phase. All you can do is watch him like a hawk, tell him it's dangerous in ...


4

While your child understands the dangerous components; my guess is that he does not understand the severity. This is difficult to convey to a child. The way which has worked for me in these types of situations is to tell my 3 year old that daddy and mommy would be sad. Attempt to convey emotions which would surface should they get hurt. State that you ...


4

http://www.kidsafeinc.com/product/308/Electric-Cord-Shortener-for-Child-Safety.html I'm personally planning on trying to have cords behind furniture like the couch. I like the cord shortener, but I'll probably do the same thing by bundling the cord and securing it with a rubber band. Another thing you can do is to have the cord run along the bottom of the ...


2

Rather than physically blocking access, we tried teaching it: What worked for us was to teach our toddler that cables are simply not to be touched. Of course he didn't learn that right away, but over time he's understood it. He's now nearly 2yo. We taught him this the same way we taught him not to touch or do other dangerous things -- use whatever method ...


2

As an engineer, my first thought would be conduit. If you get some 3/4" FMC and leave it near where you use your portable electronics, you could slip the cord in when using it docked, then slide it out when you go. Here is a pretty cheap source for a short length and best of all, this has a non-metalic outer finish.


1

This is what helped when my son was 2-year-old (and he has not touched the sockets thereafter). I told him that there is a dangerous voltage inside. Then I asked does he know what it means. He answered no. The I showed him a couple of Youtube videos about what happens if you tamper with a dangerous voltage. Here is a couple of examples: ...


1

Children live in a dangerous world, and removing the dangerous bits is not sufficient. You may have control over your surroundings, but a child is often placed in other surroundings. You need a solution that keeps them safe wherever they are. We're talking about something that can endanger the child's life. You need to do something that is different that ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible