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According to the abstract of this study of 60 3-year-old children: From these experiments we conclude that children have the metalinguistic skills necessary to identify homonym pairs; moreover, they realized that homonyms represent two different categories. Finally, if children have a one-to-one mapping assumption, it is not strong enough to prevent them ...


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I've tried in earnest to find studies to back up my following hypothesis, but I don't think I'm using the correct search terms. I believe that teaching your child more vocabulary now is much better than trying to teach them all that same vocabulary and their age-appropriate vocabulary 4 years years from now. There's a soft limit of how many new words per ...


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Depends on your definition of "stuff" in "learning stuff". There's a good amount of study that explain that teaching academic to young kids isn't really necessary. What is important is that you teach/show character, or in other word executive function. If you can teach your kid self control (body/emotion), working hard, critical thinking and ...


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I have found that it comes along as I have corrected my daughter's speech over the years as well. At the age of two I'd say she's doing just fine. According to this chart, she should be barely understandable. Sounds like your child's speech is on track, although it doesn't cover when you get into present versus past tense. According to this site, your ...


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What a toddler should be learning should be nearly entirely focused on social development and physical development. Learning to play with others, learning to get along with others, learning to talk and communicate. Learning to run, skip, hop, jump, climb. Playing is a toddler's job, and primary method of learning. So if you're hell-bent on your toddler ...


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A person's ability to learn and retain learning are inversely proportionate to their age. This doesn't mean you should start teaching your child collegiate-level philosophy, but it does mean you should try to take advantage of your child's openness to learning. Spending time with your child teaching them basic things is a good way to form a long-lasting ...


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Searching "early formal academics" will provide quite a few resources on this subject. Moving up the Grades: Relationship between Preschool Model and Later School Success by Rebecca Marcon is a good representative source. A lot of parents feel like pushing more formalized education earlier gives the child a head start, but there's a growing body of ...


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I'll answer your question with a question. University kids are able to learn advanced calculus and how to interpret difficult books and understand human psychology. Why don't I just wait until the kids are at that level, because then all of that high school maths will be so much easier for them? The reason is that knowledge builds upon knowledge. You lay ...


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The reason it is "easy for them anyways" is because even if you invest no effort, the child is still learning on their own. These things that are "easy" aren't. They're really complicated for toddlers, it's just that toddlers spend almost all of their (awake) time learning. Helping them by giving them a lot of things to play around with (read: to learn ...


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I was wondering why should I be hell bent on educating my toddler when she's going to learn the stuff anyways when she grows up? I don't know that there's great value in being "hell bent" about it, but certainly you shouldn't let the grass grow under your feet. The main value in educating young children is getting them to learn how to learn rather than ...


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When my infant was born I never knew any lullabies, so I used to sing A for ant, B for ball, C for cat.. up-till W carefully using the names of the things which could be seen in the real life daily - as a lullaby with full expressions and in a loud and clear voice. And now my toddler is 2 years old and when I say - A for, she says ant, so on and so forth ...


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As someone else suggested, start reading the words as well when you're reading to her. Teach her to read - or, more precisely, help her learn to read. Give her access to books, with some planning initially as to which books. If she's anything like I was as a kid, she'll pretty much take care of the rest herself.


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I make letter spotting a various thing with my 2.5 year old. When we're looking at things he's already interested in - colorful signs, a fire truck, whatever - I will point at a letter or a word and say it or spell it. At this point all he gets is "O" and I have not convinced him that bullet points and periods aren't also Os. :) I see from your comment that ...


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Lots of good thoughts in the other answers. Here's a couple more. You say you don't read the text of the books to her. She's getting to an age now where she can really start to appreciate the text. Many children's books have great rhythm and rhyming schemes. Reading her these will teach her about different sounds and rhythms which will set her up with a ...


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Pretty much every page of every children's book we own has new learning opportunities for our two year old! It's a pretty awesome time. You can always go into more detail about the illustrations and the story. In general, these are the subjects I ask questions or make comments about: Sizes - Big, smaller, bigger, smaller, medium, tall, short, etc. ...


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At two, while you certainly can begin working on alphabet and numerals and counting, I tend to feel that the most important things are creativity, emotions, and breadth of experience. By breadth of experience I mean to encounter a lot of different things, such that not only can the child learn about new concepts, vocabulary, cultures, and ideas, but the ...


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We've started trying to bring the stories alive by acting the stories and using props and toys. For example: We're Going on a Bear Hunt - Searching the house for different "animals" i.e. stuffed toys. We ask what the animal sounds like, what it looks like and where does it live. A hidden iPod with speakers can add to the realism (Or dad doing his best ...


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Try reading her books such as alphabets with pictures.If she enjoys reading them then she might read books by herself by the time she is 3 years old. I taught the same to my daughter when she was about same age. Also try to find a animal book with many animals on the same page. Identify them once with your daughter and play the question answer. She might ...


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Try to read passages that asks questions at the end of the reading. Find a website that has books or passages to read and questions to answer following it. I also sometimes let her read the book and ask her to say the story in her own words. She doesn't do quite as well in explaining the content of the book. I found her very much accurate in answering the ...


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I'm in the UK. Its a different system, but here is a cautionary tale: Someone I know was moved up a year in Primary school, but when he reached the end of Primary the Secondary school refused to accept him. He was forced to say goodbye to his classmates and redo the whole last year of Primary school. Make sure this isn't going to happen to your child.


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I was an advanced student, particularly in math, and I ended up in 6th grade working on my own from a 7th grade text, pretty much teaching myself. Once I hit high school, it was very easy to take upper level math (though I ran through all the available math classes at my school by end of junior year). The point of my experience here is that there are ways to ...


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I don't think there's much advantage in skipping kindergarten. Kindergarten isn't really about academics (and, there's plenty of evidence that pushing this heavily early doesn't really help kids). It's about social growth, play (which is, in fact, educational!), and creative inquiry. It's also the case that at this age, kids are just naturally at very ...


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Hmm, that seems a strange question to me. I'm a software developer and a scientifically-minded person, and I'm also a Fundamentalist Christian and a creationist. I don't see any contradiction there, it's more "I study and respect science, and THEREFORE I am a Christian". I have studied the evidence and this is where it leads me. Many of the greatest ...


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At age of three we started singing the ABC song. We look at name tags (on clothes, toys etc.) to identify if something belongs to her. She can identify and also draw an A (her name starts with A). We teach numbers in elevators so she presses the button for the right floor.


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I don't know that you need to broach this subject at all. She will learn when she is comfortable with it and when she isn't. Don't force her to give kisses if she's uncomfortable. Let it be her choice.


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Kids don't normally need explicit instruction from their parents in order to conform to the behaviors that are expected in their culture. They learn these things by example. For example, if your kid is growing up in France, she'll learn that it's normal for the male President to kiss male dignitaries on the cheek. You don't say why this is a concern, so ...


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You should tell her not to when she starts kissing those you believe shouldn't receive that level of intimacy from her, and you should be an example of appropriate intimacy levels with others. You may want to encourage her to perform these social acts with those you do want her to have that type of relationship with - kissing grandparents and siblings might ...


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When my daughter was 18 months old, she would always give us kisses when we asked. Now she is a little older and, if she doesn't want to give us a kiss when we ask, she doesn't. We didn't have to teach her, she just figured it out. Perhaps you should begin to worry about this if it becomes a problem with other people but I think she will figure it out for ...


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Make sure mealtimes look like mealtimes: Have children in highchairs. Have the highchairs pulled up to the table. Have adults sit and eat with them at the same time. Lead by example (i.e. do not throw food around yourselves!) Where possible eat the same food as the children are having. Do not offer endless alternatives that the children can have instead. ...


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I would say that it is not needed to wait. Contrary to @Alexander, I would not stop completely to ask for kisses, as my wife and me often do with our 4 years old girl. And also, as I do with my wife, and as she does with me. I think asking for kisses from someone you love is acceptable with childs as well as with adults. The thing you can do is teach her ...


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I may have some insights as a college student, although I've admittedly never lived in dormitories or campus housing. I've only been a purely nontraditional student. Disadvantages Cost I attend a state university, and the resident rates for room and board for next year are going to be about $8000 for the next school year. This includes only the fall and ...


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I suspect this varies significantly by the person and family. Some advantages to one person will be disadvantages to another. In particular, the differences: Living at home, unless you live on campus already, means a bit of a commute for the child. This means a bit less time for socializing, and less ability to join the kinds of socializing that ...


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The plain fact is that almost no one does this without either strong ideological motivation (i.e. the Kibbutz system), or severe financial necessity (orphanages) or both (Romanian orphanages), which --to me --suggests that it's probably a very bad idea. With that said, the closest you'll find is a probably an elite private boarding school. If you want to ...


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Well, one of the advantages would be that it's sort of a way to ease into living away from home. You're responsible for yourself, but you're not alone and there are people who are somewhat keeping an eye on things. There are also lots of great shared experiences to be had with others living in the dorm. Of course, some of those shared experiences may not ...


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The earlier answers are way too complicated for a parent in the U.S. seeking practical advice. So here goes: I taught in mixed, all-girls, and all-boys high schools, and substituted in middle schools, and I can say categorically, at least at the middle and high-school level, that for the vast majority of students, the best classroom is the one with the ...



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