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1

The biggest benefit I see is in causing him to think about his letter formation. Good handwriting tends to arise from people who think about the writing of the letters; bad handwriting arises from people just scrawling without making much effort to think about the letters. That said, my parents tried teaching me calligraphy with the intent of curing my ...


1

I can tell you that I have experienced the same thing with my 6 1/2 year old son. I assumed a lot of it was because he's a lefty, but now I'm starting to wonder if maybe not so much? I, too, recall having a much more stringent handwriting regimen when I was in elementary school--at least up until about second grade. I asked several of my friends (of ...


0

The information I've seen all shows that intellectual curiosity isn't something you develop. It's something all children are born with. The problem is more accurately phrased as how can you keep from unintentionally squelching that innate curiosity. Mostly that involves not making learning a "chore," giving a child intellectual freedom to explore the ...


-1

EDIT: This is pretty rapidly moving from being controversial to outright unpopular. Of course, popularity in no way affects truth. Parents all have an opportunity to raise their children for the future or to raise them in the past. Parents have an opportunity to demonstrate what should be learned and instill adaptation and innovation as virtues. ...


0

It may not quite answer your question, but I think it is related. Although I am not from the US, I feel like YES there you would be in trouble for whatever society believes is child-neglect. And I think it is scary, I think people should be really worried now, are we really ready for that? It sounds crazy. So at the end you would have to go on a trial or ...


1

Your idea of a parent building a small world of "magical" but credible and educational characters to introduce their primary school child to richer cultural environments is valid. And, as you openly acknowledge, the parent’s gamemaster role has the potential for ethical dilemmas which should be wisely considered and planned for before embarking in the game. ...


0

A's behaviour presents obvious ethical dilemmas (starting with children's right to privacy, their right not to be deceived/misguided). If you genuinely believe that children have a right not to be deceived/misguided (as per the update/edit) then to follow the proposed course of action is in exact opposition to that viewpoint. The activity outlined ...


3

In a recent study, I saw a report of, children were able to catch lies of omission. I found the study interesting, because it basically showed that if a parent or other authority figure lies to a child, the child will trust them less. It's main focus was that it was not just direct lies, but lies of omission - but I think that it tell us how children reacts ...


4

What makes A think they could succesfully pass off as an astrophysicist, a musician, an artist, a philosopher, a mathematician, and a neuroscientist? The only things the child could get out of this are gross misconceptions about what all those people do.


4

I see two major problems with this: Parents shouldn't be interacting with their own children on a peer level. Tricking your child into being "just friends" could lead to some very awkward situations. Like what if your child says something to you while being tricked where you feel you need to intervene as a parent? You'd probably break the ruse then, ...


1

I wonder, if (1) A does not have any friends of his/her age, that he/she needs to fake friendships with his/her child... or (2) B does not have any friends, and B tries to "help" with imaginary friends... To answer your question: yes, I think it is worse, than pretending to be Santa Claus or the Tooth Fairy. The other question about becoming ethical ...


9

I think the question needs to be asked... what is the purpose of these letters? I honestly have a hard time imagining a situation where this could be justified for such trivial purposes as you mentioned. There is a psychotherapy technique that involves a similar method, but that's a different question entirely... and such things should probably involve ...


13

Unfortunately the specific answer to your question is "yes the law might forbid children from being out and about without supervision, but it depends on the state". I believe the section of law most applicable to this question is "child neglect", and for the most part the definitions of child neglect are left to the states. There is a very wide variety in ...



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