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4

Not knowing your son I can only speculate, but the whole description sorta hits home with me, so here's my stab into the dark and advice: He's probably incredibly bored by school. I know second hand that Japanese schools don't have particularly inventive teaching methods, and he's probably bored by sitting and listening all day to a teacher who may not be ...


0

If you get 95s on your tests, then presumably you get bad grades because you don't bother with the homework? If so, you might want to reconsider your decision not to go to college. At college, usually most of your grade is based on your tests; the homework is just there in case you think you need practice. In the meantime, if there are classes that are ...


2

You need a better plan, kid. This will be a bit of a harsh answer, but you definitely seem smart and mature enough to deserve one. First of all, don't waste a single further breath explaining your "philosophical" objections to school, why you feel it's bullshit, to your dad. No dad has the slightest bit of regard for his son's "wisdom" on things like that. ...


1

My daughter used to rush into elevator alone. We told her again and again not to do that. One time we purposefully didn't follow her fast enough. And the door closed. A scream and crying followed. A second later we reached the elevator and opened the door. She never entered it alone since. I agree with HedgeMage - if your kid is not reasonable enough to ...


2

Assuming that we're talking about a kid who's lacking risk assessment skills, not one who is developmentally disabled, the best way to teach kids about danger is to let them experience it, including letting them experience when things go wrong! If you give your kid the scare routine, you're doing that -- scaring him -- not teaching him to be competent at ...


6

While a formal diagnosis may not be important, I think it is important to explore the possibility of your child being dyslexic in addition to (or possibly instead of) being ADHD. We suspected that our son was dyslexic due to the significant differences in his abilities in most subjects versus his reading abilities. He was able to compensate so well that ...


0

I can understand your concern about staying focused for a 7 year old. It's such a tough age because more is being demanded of them in school and they have a limited attention span at that age. I agree with @Joe, it's important to know when he has the most difficulty focusing. Also, it would be helpful to ask yourself: Does he have difficulty following ...


2

If he is smart enough to enjoy "why", then a really good approach I'd recommend would be to go through the various invasions of England (Vikings, Angles, Saxons, Jutes etc) and tie the various words back to language. Once you know the source, you can make very good guesses as to the rules for words you don't know.


2

First, English is weird. From talking to a few people I know who had to learn English as a second language, it's pretty hard, especially compared to some others for the reasons your son has identified. Pronunciation rules aren't consistent. Spelling isn't consistent. Other languages (like Spanish, for instance) have well-defined rules about how spelling ...


5

I would keep it simple and accurate: first of all 1) the language we use wasn't designed, nobody sat down and invented it, and 2) it's a hodge-podge/mongrel/mixture from a lot of different sources (other languages) over a lot of different time periods, thousands of years. If you need an illustration, you might locate some examples of "Olde Englishe" before ...


0

It may not be comprehension at all, and it likely has nothing to do with your niece. He might just have a different personality and/or learning style than your other children. It sounds like he isn't interested in the questions you are asking him, and that he is thinking about other things. I have only 2 children, but that has been enough to show me that ...


0

ok... quite a few good answers here already. Still, putting my two cents worth in here. First of all, my own son (at 5.5 years old) has the same issue. So do quite a few kids in his class (though to a lesser extent I guess). He mirrors 'b', 'd', 'p', 'q', '3', '5' etc. Guess what? He's a natural lefty. He used to dominantly use his left hand, still kicks ...



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