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0

If you are worried about stifling her imagination, you could get her something other than a realistic human doll. There are plenty of anthropomorphic stuffed animals (such as teddy bears) that would love to be invited to tea parties! As a bonus, they tend to be viewed as more gender-neutral toys.


2

Have you thought of making her a doll? Or helping her make her own? You can do wonders with a wooden spoon; paint a face on it, add a handkerchief and a rubber band and you've got a doll. Craft shops have wooden heads and eyes and feet and stuff if you want to get serious, and there are plenty of how-to books.


2

I would like to offer an alternative viewpoint on this question, which is that perhaps it simply doesn't have an answer. If you were to ask what number will a die throw produce, and someone answered 5 and someone answered 3 and someone else answered 1 and then you chose the "5" answer, would that make any sense? Or would you just be choosing your favorite ...


3

Letting children play with dolls when they want to is not limiting their creativity, it allows them yet another dimension. My dolls were pirates and divers and firemen and spacemen... Another thing no-one here mentioned; since we had no cash for doll-accessories, my sister and I made stuff for our dolls - vehicles, tools, furniture, and later on clothes - ...


2

Dolls are very useful for encouraging role play. Some children naturally play at random with anything they have - my older (3yo) son does this, but didn't earlier in life. My twenty month old son, however, has a doll and loves it; he hugs it like a baby and very obviously begins to role play with it at a younger age than his older brother did (who had ...


5

The benefit of a factory doll versus a made-up doll is, generally, more anatomically correct and potentially safer because it's (allegedly) designed for safety versus a (glass?) jar of pickles. Anatomically correct is certainly in the eye of the beholder, but generally speaking it matters for practical applications, especially in the fine motor skills ...


20

In particular, we are wondering about the benefits of dolls. Helps develop coordination, motor skills, social skills, and imagination. Allows the child to act out different roles. Dressing, grooming, feeding skills are reinforced with doll play. Coordination when carefully carrying the doll, rocking, or pushing in a stroller. Helps add to the ...


12

Giving a doll to a child who would obviously love it isn't reinforcing a stereotype. Giving a doll to a girl who you know doesn't like dolls is. That's an important distinction. What you should worry about is avoiding letting her love of dolls blind you to her other interests and talents which you might also support. My 5 year-old daughter loves dolls, ...


4

I was dubious about getting my little girl a doll as I also did not want to enforce stereo types onto her but she got one for Christmas last year. At first she wasn't interested but recently has started to play with it a lot, she has a little doll's pram and blanket and little bottle and spoon and dish and she loves to feed her "baba" and put her in her ...


1

My 17 month old granddaughter loves to play with the doll, blanket and crib we have at our house. I have a large grand-kid closet which has trains, cars, dolls, lawnmowers, building blocks, books, slides, tea sets, barbies etc. Whatever she wants to play with is fine and encouraged. Last weekend she spent 45 minutes playing with the doll. Putting her to ...


4

I've taught eighth grade (13-14 year-old kids) algebra for 28 years. The kids who arrive at middle school not knowing their basic multiplication facts are very unlikely to succeed in math in high school. Those facts are fundamental to everything from multiplication to division to fractions to factoring polynomials. They don't really understand any of these ...


12

This reminds me of such a fun to-do kids' activity at our house. :) About every other month, we would have a "restaurant" lunch at home. I named the restaurant "Susie-Q's", printed up menus on my printer (with ridiculously low prices) that the kids could read (or have help reading). They could choose anything and everything they wanted from it. I ...


0

I would agree about the need to continue to learn to write over type. Most schools are now using tablets (ipads or android) rather than laptops, so young kids aren't yet learning typing. I can attest as a current PhD student that iPads are inadequate for note taking. You can "half" type, "half" write, and there are a million apps for note taking. But ...


0

Working as in a facility where we welcome all children, ive had this conversation many times with children. one of the kids that comes to our facility regularaly has down syndrome, the past summer she started attending our summer camp, and she was put in my group of 4 year olds, i ahd a few come up to me and ask whats wrong with her.... i just replied with ...


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Maybe a complete opposite approach is worth to try. Focus on what you want. I assume the interaction between Relative and your children is as safe as they are with you. (Keep in mind that things you want consist of positive acts that create synergy, altruism is key). What could create a stronger bond between Relative and your children? What do you like ...


3

I'm late to this party, but the turn taken in comments is compelling me to speak up. I don't think political correctness is the goal here; humanity and humility are. If this were another illness - say molluscum contagiosum - would it be OK for a stranger to come up to your children and say "Your mother is a walking sexually transmitted disease, a pox of ...


0

Ok, my wife was at least 8 before some kind stranger told her her mother was 'crazy'. It's a pretty simple concept. I'm sorry Christine, but your mother is nuts. Until then she thought her mother's bizarre behavior was normal. If someone had just explained it to her earlier a LOT of trauma could have been avoided. Her mother has severe schizophrenia or ...


33

Our 10 year-old has obvious mental and physical symptoms of her cerebral palsy, so we've had this conversation many times. We've found that adults are the ones who have problems coming up with explanations. They try to overcomplicate it and be too politically correct. Kids are usually satisfied with something simple and direct. They ask out of honest ...


5

"Hypochondria" is a stigmatising judgemental term. Use Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder instead. You don't say how old the children are. For young children you use short sentences. You explain the person is ill. You explain that the person is getting help with the illness. Older children will want to talk about emotions and what they've seen and how they ...


0

I can only speak to my experience and the community I live in, but... Sex, birth, and death are all part of life. So are love, hate, joy, dread, excitement and exhaustion. Trying to pretend the happy ones are all there is doesn't seem to work out well. Pretending that some of the happy ones are dirty or shameful seems even more twisted. Its more honest to ...


0

Read this book. It has lots of great insight as to how to approach this as a parent, someone close to, or the person with said issues. It all comes down to "play to your strengths". Nothing is off the table - but there will be things that (for whatever reason) are just not going to work.


3

I also have a son with ADHD, and am mildly chagrined to realize I haven't yet given much thought to his life after my household. A web search for "job suitable for adhd" turns up a few lists. Some common results: Military Medical (doctor or nurse) Police or Firefighter Truck driver Sales (particularly commission-based) Entertainment These tend to ...



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