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7

I actually had a similar question a couple years ago. What I've learned since then is you mostly just need to wait. Kids don't really hit the developmental milestones for fluent reading until around age 7 or 8. Schools are teaching it earlier now mostly due to political pressure, not due to that being the best timetable for the way kids naturally learn. ...


3

I used to be a primary school teaching assistant. One of the things that may help comprehension is context. And by context I mean literary context. You can build up her 'context' bank by reading and then re-reading stories of a specific genre to her. E.g. we were taught (as teaching assistant's) that all those "Once upon a time" stories we heard as ...


6

How about having her write some stories/paragraphs? Not necessarily about the particular book she's reading, but about any subject in general. Kids learn in different ways, and I have noticed that my first-grade speed-reader's reading comprehension improved when she started writing books for her little brother. There's also the tactic of taking the ...


2

A couple of resources I haven't seen anyone mention: If you live near a university/college you can check out their chapter of ACM (Association for Computing Machinery) and see if they have any high school outreach activities going on. Even if they don't they may allow a mature middle/high school student to join their general meetings. Civil Air Patrol - ...


1

When I was a kid my Father told me that he would help me buy anything I wanted as long as I saved up half of the funds first. I think this really alleviated a lot of the burden of guilt for him not buying me things I was interested in. For one, it put everything I wanted or thought I wanted into a que of, "How much am I actually interested in this?" If I ...


9

My parents supported my interests with very limited funds. Yes, some items can be very expensive. However, there are also inexpensive items that you can get a lot of use out of. Also, there is something to be said for the challenge of using limited resources, even if you can afford better. I still take this approach with supplies with my own children. ...


1

Two routes I would take. First, encourage your child to earn his/her own money to buy these kits. There are lots of ways to do that as a child, mowing lawns, babysitting, doing odd jobs, gardening, etc. Then you combine two lessons in one. Offer to match his/her earnings, if you can do that, or some other incentive from your end. Second, if you have a ...


0

It is certainly true that there are educational opportunities that are expensive: special programs, summer camps, supplies and equipment that you could buy, etc. But there's a lot of educational opportunity that costs very little. One of the best ways to learn anything remains, "read a book". Books are not all that expensive, and you can get many for free ...


2

I would suggest that you reach out to some STEM teachers in your area. They may know of some opportunities in your area. If there isn't anything, then you could start an after-school club, or summer program. You can recruit volunteers who can provide the technical guidance, and do some fundraising. In other words, you would be in sort of a manager role. ...


1

I'd like to help her in dealing with her giftedness. I can relate. As you discovered, as a child, a little boredom in school won't kill anyone is not true. Being chronically bored in school can be excruciating, and the feeling of isolation can be permanently damaging -- hence, the tremendous anxiety you feel, and the loving desire you have to ...


1

Mr Rogers taught children in his television programs that they do not have to share. In other words, children should not be forced to share something that they prefer to keep private. Perhaps it would be helpful for you if, in your own internal thinking about your daughter's reading, you concentrated on feeling joyful for your daughter about her discovery ...


1

Originally, the definition for childhood IQ was to test the child for various abilities, and then compare it with the scores of the averages of different age groups. The child's mental age would be the age in the population that had the closest average score to the child. Divide the child's mental age by their real age, and multiply by 100. So you can get a ...


1

I don't know if this will help but I have a daughter of a very similar age with some similar characteristics. What strikes me about your daughter is reading and arithmetic. I've certainly not witnessed any children either reading or doing any form of arithmetic at this age. My daughter is currently 2 years and 5 months, she can: Count from 1 to 10 in ...


1

Considering the link in your comment: http://www.bownet.org/BESGifted/brightvs.htm, what I got from that is not the difference between "gifted" and "bright" but rather the difference between "observant" and "curious". My brother and I are like this. I am the "curious" type (what you'd call gifted) and my brother is the "observant" type (what you call ...


1

Really it's much more complicated than 'left' and 'right'. First, of course there are hard and soft left and right, i.e. changing how far, how fast, and will there ever be an end to it? Next, consider the international differences, such as republicanism being left-wing in the UK and right-wing in the US. And there are historical nuances, such as revolutions ...


2

Classifying your daughter seems very important right now, but consider the consequences of that classification. Success from hard work reinforces a work ethic whereas success from intelligence fosters the view that challenges result from the lack of intelligence. Intelligence is an intrinsic property whereas humility, persistence, empathy and kindness are ...


1

Is she meeting your local school system's expectations for literacy? If so, I'd say that her reading skills are more an interesting peculiarity than something to make a big deal about. I don't think it is the parent's job to quiz or test a kid about his or her skills, unless there is a concern that the kid is having issues. It is generally considered that ...


2

You may or may not consider me "gifted". I was halfway through the fourth grade curriculum when I finished first grade (I had an awesome first grade teacher who encouraged me to work ahead. My family is still friends with her 18 years later). The school wanted me to skip straight to the fourth grade, but my parents decided to keep me with my age group so I ...


4

The widely used WAIS intelligence test has a version for children that can be taken from the age of 2 and a half; any professional psychologist should be able to administer this test. Also, if there are no special schools for gifted children in your area, try to find a school that allows bright children to skip a year. It's a simple but apparently effective ...


8

I was "gifted." By the second grade, I was so bored with school that my teacher thought I was learning disabled! Fortunately, my school principal was wise. She tested me, then immediately skipped me to the next grade, then a few months later transferred me to the hardest teacher (the "mean" teacher, LOL). That helped a lot (for a few years, anyway -- ...


3

I'm the father of a 2 year old and I can't understand if she's gifted or just very bright. From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intellectual_giftedness: There is no generally agreed definition of giftedness for either children or adults, but most school placement decisions and most longitudinal studies over the course of individual lives have been ...


9

It's most likely too early to tell. If you could tell, it would depend greatly on how she is learning the things she knows. Children's brains at that age have an extraordinary capacity for repeating things they observe, but mere remembering and repetition doesn't mean true understanding is happening. For example, if she is learning to read new words from ...


13

I'm not sure the difference between gifted or not is important to your actual question, which seems to be how to keep your girl learning and wanting to learn. Your primary concern, that she will be bored of school and hate going, happens even with non-gifted students. Right now, everything she learns is fun - like a game. Learning is "playing", and she ...


21

(I'm going to focus on how to help her, rather than determining if she's gifted according to an external set of criteria.) Whether your daughter is considered "gifted" according to the person/methodology used to test this, go ahead & TREAT her as if she's gifted. In other words, do what you're doing now: spend time with her, help her find things she ...


4

Before you can figure out what to do about it, you need to understand the root cause. Maybe she's shy about receiving praise. I'm a 56 year old man so obviously not the same situation, but I get uncomfortable when people compliment me. I just really don't like praise. Especially if it's drawn out. Maybe she feels like she's being asked to perform and ...


0

Step 1: Give her any book to read on her own and then ask her basic questions on it like "What are the names of the characters?" and "What is the book about?" This will help her to feel more confident in her reading ability. Step 2: Keep repeating step 1 using different books until you think she is more confident. Step 3: Try asking her how to spell ...


1

My wife actually sent me this link on raising smart kids. I think the principles here translate very well into your situation. The focus of the article is on training yourself not to tell your kids they're smart. Instead, it focuses on teaching them a method to figure out how to accomplish things and seek greater challenges. Things like this for praise: ...


0

When he wakes up in the morning, he has a LOT OF ENERGY! He wants to run around and play! He can do this all day! But slowly, he gets tired the more he runs. At the end of the day, he'll notice he wants to sleep. He has used up most of his energy! Some people work very hard to make energy for heating up the water, so don't waste it!


2

If you have a wind-up flashlight (a flashlight with a hand generator), you can make this very simple. Have the child turn the crank to give the battery a charge. Then ask them how they would feel if they had turned the crank for an hour, then they saw someone turn on the flashlight, leave it on, and walk away. Both the physics and the English of this ...


2

Funny enough, I just thought about the same question for myself two days ago. My abstract answer (I am a physicist) was - without consulting books: "energy is the property of a physical system required to invokes the change of state of a physical system. Energy can be tranferred from one physical system to another (invoking change of state) and can be stored ...


-1

To me, the Jewish identity is not just about obeying the Torah verbatim. It's mostly about the community and the cultural identity. The community is very tight-knit, of course, which is one of its strengths. It seems clear to me that rote obedience to ancient prescriptions is not what most Jewish people consider fundamental to being Jewish. I went to a ...


2

stored motion when you bring a pencil up, and let it go, it starts moving when a child eats a chocolate, it uses the chocolate to power its movements when you connect a blender to a power outlet, it uses the energy in the wires (whatever that is =P) to move when you put gas in car, it burns the gas and moves when you burn something, it releases ...


0

Watch David Attenborrough's nature shows a family staple. We used to gather on the big bed with a computer and watch them together. There are dozens, many on Netflix. My oldest is now studying conservation biology in college. Just coincidence? Maybe . . . .


0

In the Oxford dictionary there are two relevant definitions: power derived from using physical or chemical resources; or a property of matter and radiation, manifested as a capacity to perform work. The second (Physics) definition really (for any understanding) requires you to continue to explain how, for example (and amongst many other things), photons ...


2

Late to the game, but I'll add my 2 cents. Maybe a long 2 cents. I would say that energy is what does work. In terms he can understand for the hot water, have him rub his hands together (palm to palm) until they warm up. (You can explain friction in simple terms, or hold off.) When he rubs his hands together, friction causes his hands to warm up. The ...


1

Energy is not a tangible thing, it isn't something you can touch, see, hear, taste or feel, energy is a concept, just like a number is a concept, just like speed is a concept. It's not a real thing like a tree, a bacteria, water, or the Sun. And because energy is a concept, it is misleading and a source of confusion to use language such as "waste energy", ...


8

Richard Feynman tells this story in "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman": It was the kind of thing my father would have talked about: "What makes it go? Everything goes because the sun is shining." And then we would have fun discussing it: "No, the toy goes because the spring is wound up," I would say. "How did the spring get wound up?" he would ...


-2

I teach Electrical engineering and physics to 5-7 year olds. I just replace the word electron with magic, and energy with "the force". later, when they want to argue with me, we can discuss it further. I try to not let language be the barrier that stops kids from learning, and being observant. I try to teach an applied and observed perspective of science, ...


2

Of the existing answers I think A E's is excellent, I will just add that you might also want to explain/emphasis that energy is not just something that exists that can be consumed for various purposes and then is disappearing afterwords (e.g. the first law of thermodynamics). Fuel in a car is stored energy that transfers into motion, heat and sound. Wood ...


4

These other answers seem too abstract for a 5-year-old. I don't think he's ready for that yet. Stick to the visible and concrete. Take him outside and show him the power cables going to your house, that lead into your fusebox/meter. Show him the meter moving. Explain to him that there's a company that makes electricity (not quite the right words ...


0

Find a game that uses some kind of energy, whether it's magic points or player energy or run speed or something like that. Kids latch on to games and they will quickly realize they don't have enough energy for every single thing they want to do. Once they have a good understanding of this concept, you can start to apply it to all kinds of resources that are ...


4

My six and eight year olds know energy as "the ability to do work" or, as AE mentioned, the ability to change something. Make the water hotter? That is change and requires energy. Bounce more photons off the walls so that our eyes can collect enough photons to see? Those photons move very fast so it takes a lot of work (energy) to move them. Note that I ...


1

Energy is potential. It gives us the ability to do something useful. So there's energy coming into the house, and it has the potential to provide light, heat, and motion, but until we connect it it's only potential. Once we turn on a switch, or plug in the fan, the energy is converted into light or motion until we turn the switch or fan off. You have ...


15

Energy is the power to do things. I'm sure your 5 yo is full of it. When he is full of energy he can run and play for hours on end and have a good time. When he runs out, he can't do that any more and needs to sleep and eat to build up more so he can play again. There are many kinds of energy, like electrical and heat. Electrical energy lets the ...


8

Here's one explanation aimed at primary-age children which is probably basic enough, although of course it's focussed on what energy does and what we use it for, rather than what energy is. But that's probably the best you'll get them to understand at this age. Energy Makes Change Energy makes change—it produces a change of some kind; it does things ...


3

"For me there has been no serious difficulty in reconciling the principles of true science with the principles of true religion, for both are concerned with the eternal verities of the universe." - Henry Eyring, chemist These words from Dr. Eyring have motivated me in my own life as I simultaneously pursue a Ph.D. in astrophysics while being very active in ...


6

Wonderful question! If you can steer away from the dogma that the written Word is literal truth (with all the contortions you have to go through to reconcile internal inconsistencies), you can focus on the bigger picture. Science and exploration comes naturally to small children. Fill a balloon with helium and watch it float up. Plant seeds or bulbs in the ...


0

It strikes me that discussion of science and religion, while seeking out different kinds of truth, need not get wrapped up in questions of certainty and belief, at least not in the first place. First, both religious faith and science involve radical kinds of doubt: faith without doubt is pretty empty (no 'leap') and science without doubt is just incoherent. ...


0

To answer the part of your question about how should you teach science and help engender a passion for science in your kids, I would suggest that focus on science as experimentation and investigation of the world we live in. What happens when we add this to that, count how long between thunder and lighting. What falls faster, a feather or a leaf. How big ...


11

Science is a tool. Whether it is good or bad depends on who wields it. For all the controversy, things that allegedly conflict between science and religion rarely come up in practice. Personally, I find an evolutionary process to be a rather logical way to effect a creation for someone with infinite time and insight. Even if I didn't, I had to spend all ...



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