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1

Your idea of a parent building a small world of "magical" but credible and educational characters to introduce their primary school child to richer cultural environments is valid. And, as you openly acknowledge, the parent’s gamemaster role has the potential for ethical dilemmas which should be wisely considered and planned for before embarking in the game. ...


0

A's behaviour presents obvious ethical dilemmas (starting with children's right to privacy, their right not to be deceived/misguided). If you genuinely believe that children have a right not to be deceived/misguided (as per the update/edit) then to follow the proposed course of action is in exact opposition to that viewpoint. The activity outlined ...


3

In a recent study, I saw a report of, children were able to catch lies of omission. I found the study interesting, because it basically showed that if a parent or other authority figure lies to a child, the child will trust them less. It's main focus was that it was not just direct lies, but lies of omission - but I think that it tell us how children reacts ...


3

What makes A think they could succesfully pass off as an astrophysicist, a musician, an artist, a philosopher, a mathematician, and a neuroscientist? The only things the child could get out of this are gross misconceptions about what all those people do.


3

I see two major problems with this: Parents shouldn't be interacting with their own children on a peer level. Tricking your child into being "just friends" could lead to some very awkward situations. Like what if your child says something to you while being tricked where you feel you need to intervene as a parent? You'd probably break the ruse then, ...


1

I wonder, if (1) A does not have any friends of his/her age, that he/she needs to fake friendships with his/her child... or (2) B does not have any friends, and B tries to "help" with imaginary friends... To answer your question: yes, I think it is worse, than pretending to be Santa Claus or the Tooth Fairy. The other question about becoming ethical ...


6

I think the question needs to be asked... what is the purpose of these letters? I honestly have a hard time imagining a situation where this could be justified for such trivial purposes as you mentioned. There is a psychotherapy technique that involves a similar method, but that's a different question entirely... and such things should probably involve ...


13

Unfortunately the specific answer to your question is "yes, but it depends on the state". For the most part the definitions of child neglect are left to the states, generally 'neglect' would, I believe, be the charge. There are often specific laws involving "leaving children alone at home", but they usually don't have much to say about leaving children ...


1

Have you got her checked for Scotopic syndrome(Light Sensitivity)? I am reading this book Teaching Outside the box and according to this, this is a fairly common problem which hinders people from reading. This book has 2 entire chapters on reading related problems which the author experienced in her teaching career. Here is more info.


2

Your question is about learning but your post is about reading. For reading you probably want to concentrate on synthetic phonics. Find a bunch of different books and set aside some time each day for fun reading. Fun reading can be anything - snuggled up cozy in a pillow-fort den, or active and with lots of motions and acting and voices. You can get ...


7

First of all, keep in mind that many if not most children are not really developmentally ready for formal academics until age 7 or so. I don't know where you're located, but here in the U.S., recent academic standards are set mostly by politicians, and don't always line up very well with early childhood research. It used to be that schools didn't even ...


-1

Pollyanna, the leading character of a novel by Eleanor H. Porter is a great role model because she taught kids optimism.


0

You know, I wrote that really long answer yesterday, and I stand by it, but I was thinking about this today and I've come to a more refined conclusion. Sex isn't something that parents or teachers can or should teach to their children. It's a whole, big, weird concept. I'm not saying you shouldn't try to, there are aspects of growing up wherein sex and ...


1

I'm not a parent, rather a child, and as someone who's relatively recently (I'm nineteen, so not that recently, but still) been on the other side of this everlasting dilemma, I'm inclined to err on the side of keeping the conversation natural, but firm. In other words, I consider myself fortunate that I was never sat down and talked to about the "birds and ...



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