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2

Firstly, if you're going to a specialist clinic I would assume that they are going to give far better and tailored advice that "the internet" will be able to, especially from the few details you give in the question. I think the main problem might be that he (very understandably) prefers breastfeeding to solid food! Now, obviously you cannot control your ...


0

Relax. Let your child eat what he wants, when you can. He will by himself learn to eat other things. I did that and I've seem many people do that -- you probably did it also. All you must have is patience. Don't force food on your child, that will force him to take a deep choice for himself: "I don't like this", and that decision, once internalized, can ...


1

I agree with all the above, we have had 21 years of hell/stress, didnt eat out because there was nothing he could eat, before, you turn around you have not had a life, last child completely different all same meals, if he didnt eat it, he went hungry, I was a lot tougher as I just couldnt go through that again and I knew he would not die from starvation, (10 ...


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I really feel for you as have been through the same thing, my son is now 21 and still picky, (sorry) but he has two older sisters and one younger brogher of 12 years, the two older ones never had a problem with them but when their brother came along wow was he different, when he had breakfast, just toddling, he would keep it in his mouth all day, not swallow ...


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One approach that can work is to put a teaspoonful of a disliked food on the plate and insist that it be eaten. Once you have broken though his refusal to eat it on principle, you can gradually increase the amount.


4

You say limited himself to these foods but this doesn't make sense. A four year old can't buy or prepare himself food. If he's not underweight and has no relevant underlying medical problem, the reason he is eating only these foods is because you're offering them to him. I'm confident that this is a fairly simple limit/boundary-setting problem, not ...


3

I was a very fussy eater until my mid teens. Nothing would have convinced me to eat more widely. Once your are on a limited diet new foods do genuinely repulse you. Everything becomes an "acquired taste". You may as well be trying to feed him slugs. if it helps, I remember texture being more of an issue than flavour.Maybe try very bland looking liquidy ...


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1: Avoid food fights As they say "You can lead a horse to water but you can't make it drink" Kids are pretty powerless over their parents, but there are two domains where they rapidly discover that they do have power: eating, and sleeping. Of course, the more you care (and show it), the more power they have. (It can be useful to do a bit of ...


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A lot of kids that age regress in what they want to eat. She'll be fine. Also, kids go through growth spurts where they want to eat more, your kid might just be out of one of those, and the new normal is lower than you are used to. Just keep on offering a variety of healthy foods, she'll get what she needs. It's a phase that will pass. (My pediatrician ...


3

Something that I find helps is a structured dinner time. Always eat dinner at the table, together as a family, at the same time. This way the child knows what to expect. Also, as others have mentioned, I find it helpful to always feed the child the same food as us adults. Usually, I'll give her smaller portions and I will cut it up for her. Also, I'll ...



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