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-3

the best thing to do with toddlers when it comes to food is to stop caring. the more you care, the more of a struggle it will be. if doing airplane makes it easier, then do airplane.


1

** Let me say we have been to the specialists, therapists, doctors, etc. This answer is based on what I have to do when all the normal suggestions fail ** Oh man, you and me both. My 2 1/2 year old is doing the same things. Let me tell you what I've figured out myself. Most of it is a battle, and probably doesn't set up the best structure for meal time, but ...


21

Please do not read this answer as bashing your parenting style. I know from experience that it's easy to fall into a pattern of wanting your child to eat more or differently, and end up coercing them into doing so. My daughter was flagged as underweight by her doctors as a toddler, so as a family we have a long history of struggling with helping her eat well ...


8

She's old enough to realize what eating is and that it is necessary. If she doesn't want to eat, don't make her. But make it clear that when she refuses, the next meal will be in, say, 3 hours. If that's her choice, stick to it. Don't give in by offering her something to eat in the meantime, don't let her fill up on sweets, etc., be strong and wait for the ...


11

A child will not starve itself. She is probably not eating because she is not hungry. Forcing her will only make it less enjoyable for her, imo. Ask her if she is hungry/if she wants to eat something at some points of the day. When she does, propose food you can give her, and follow her tastes. If she is hungry when you also are eating, propose to eat with ...


1

I think it's reasonable to ask ourselves whether we're setting up something to be repeated rather than just getting past an obstacle, but remember there's also the good associations we may be making. You don't want this to be the only way she'll eat, but on the other hand you don't want to set up the main course as something she only gives lip service too ...


6

I have four adult children, and we played food-as-airplane with all of them. While it's true that they all lost weight upon entering college as they struggled with learning to feed themselves without our entertainment, I can say that they have all achieved normal weight and are adept at self-feeding now. OK, that was an attempt at a joke. :-) Play airplane ...


3

My daughter, now 8.5, also used to struggle us at every situation she got in (and she still does). I don't want this, I don't want that, you never listen to me, my brother may do that but I don't, it's always my fault, you don't love me, I don't love you, and so on. This is life, these are kids, that's almost standard. No kid in the world grows up sitting ...


1

I think it's important to solve why is she hating food? What message are you sending about food? From the description, it sounds like "It's time you stop playing and try to behave and eat" Maybe you also are taking the meal time as a tedious routine... I agree with RedSonja, get her involved in preparation and make it a fun time to be together.


2

Make eating with cutlery a privilege, not a duty. Don't give her any cutlery for a while, then give her sloppy food without a spoon (you can leave a spoon or fork lying around). Ask "are you big enough to use a fork?". Use some cute fork with a cartoon figure on it. Set a good example. Always eat tidily, and make it a fun time, where people chat about ...


5

Something important is missing here, and that's her pattern of behavior away from the table. That has to be a factor in all of this. If she's a little bundle of energy all the other times, well, it's going to be harder. My first question is, what did she get for her stickers? If all she got were stickers, that wouldn't work for me, either! How would you ...


17

The problem with issues like table manners is twofold: first, you want your children to behave appropriately; but second, you also want your children to choose to behave appropriately. Teaching the first is not all that difficult; punishments, delivered appropriately, will certainly yield a result eventually. Teaching the second, however, won't ...


17

The balance of power is very one-sided in a parent/child relationship. Children have very little power unless allowed by the parents. Probably you are giving her too much power because you want the outcome more than she does. The way to take it back is to find something she wants more, and take it away, or something she hates even worse, and make her ...


0

I have to say that the primary reason your son is not eating food in the day is that he is getting it at night. So you need to cut down night feeds quickly to nothing. Limit it to 2 oz per feed on the first night (or 5 mins) and then reduce the number of feeds and the daytime intake will increase; it may take a couple of days, but I have known a number of ...


4

As a Scout Leader, I've seen this a lot of times. Typically the parent of a boy of about 13/14 years old expresses astonishment (and sometimes embarrassment) at the amount their son will suddenly eat, if given the opportunity. I don't want to be sexist here, obviously in many families it is the father who does the cooking, but in my experience it's always ...


4

Find out what worries your parents: If they refuse to give you another sandwich, they must have a reason. Could be money, health concerns, fear of you becoming overweight, some philosophical concerns, etc. You can much more effectively communicate and find a solution if you know what specifically is bugging them in the first place. For example: it if's ...


3

It may help if you approach it more scientifically than simply "need more food!" Discuss calories with them. For example, the USDA Daily Food Plan website says a moderately active 16-year-old male needs 3200 calories a day. This is nearly twice what I'm supposed to eat a day as an adult woman, so at first glance it's almost absurd -- but when I pause and ...


1

I feel stuck as I can't see a solution that fits my desired parenting style whilst maintaining my sanity, not being too upset with my son and getting enough sleep to function at work. You are stuck, because you have conflicting desires/goals here. Prioritizing is painful when you want so much for your baby, yet it results in a significant cost to you. ...



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