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27

This is an iffy situation, especially if you have a good relationship with your sister. On one hand, you don't want her to be mad at you and on the other, you want her to be safe and you want to protect her. First of all, not doing anything is wrong. It would be turning a blind eye to a potentially dangerous situation. If something did happen to her in the ...


16

One thing nobody else has picked up on: If you ignore the drug thing for a moment, you were going through her stuff, when she clearly wasn't expecting you to. The best way to open the conversation might be to apologise for that. Otherwise, in effect what you'll be saying is "I was going through your stuff and found this, now I've confiscated it, and need to ...


10

Sounds to me, like you and your daughter had a very healthy and honest conversation - and trust me when I say, those are the kind that work. I worked with adolescents for ten years as a health and science teacher as well as was advisor to a class of about 20 eighth grade kids each year. Considering the fact that I had around 100 kids each year I taught, ...


9

It's a complicated issue that doesn't have an easy answer. Arguments for involving parents include protecting her from becoming an addict; substance abuse could ruin her life. Arguments against involving parents include the consequences (particularly legal, if your parents would involve law enforcement). Despite the stigma, there are worse things she could ...


8

I'm seeing a lot of hysterical overreaction here. Ecstasy, used occasionally and in small quantities, is not a high-risk drug: something goes wrong about 1 out of 10,000 times, compared with 1 in 350 for horse riding. The UK's Academy of Medical Sciences ranks it at 18 out of 20 in dangerousness, way below alcohol (5) and tobacco (9). In short, the ...


8

I would talk to a professional first. I was friends with a drug addict for a while, and in my experience they can be masters at deflection. For example, if you confront your sister, my guess is that she'd say she's keeping the pills for someone else. A professional could tell you what to expect from the confrontation, and give you some pointers on what to do ...


7

Be honest - you're concerned & have a reason to be. If we ignore it and act like everything is ok, how are teens going to get the message of where to draw the line? She may be mad, but you obviously just happened to have seen the stuff by accident and are honestly worried about her. Let her know why you are worried and how much she means to you. ...


6

How you should react will depend on what your child has gotten into and how they are currently acting. First, lets clarify what each option will get you. Poison Control (U.S.: 1-800-222-1222) See This URL for information about who you will be talking to (medical experts in toxicology), what information they will ask you, etc. The Poison Control Center ...


4

According to the US Dept. of Health and Human Services Poison Help website and the Mayo Clinic, you should first call Poison Control, unless the victim is unconscious, having trouble breathing, having seizures, or is "uncontrollably restless or agitated" (I assume this is meant to be a proxy for high adrenaline levels, and not meant to imply simply stressed ...


3

During the first two weeks of pregnancy there is very exchange of substances between the mother and the embrio. And the pregnancy, by definition, actually starts at the moment the woman supposed to have her period. So one may say that the first three weeks are actually quite safe in regards to drinking or other substances use or abuse. After that, however, ...


2

I think it's OK to have a liquor cabinet, but I think it's wrong (or at the ver least unnecessary) to lock it. Your children should know what they can't do and why (like using your or any liquors for several reasons), but they should also know that you trust them. Putting a simple barrier is enough to make the intention clear. Putting a strong barrier ...


2

You are the only one who can make the decision on what to do based off information you get from others and your personal values and beliefs. The question that I recommend you ask yourself is whether you're willing to risk your relationship with your sister (and possibly have her hate you) in order to potentially save her life. There is no guarantee that the ...


1

The answer largely depends on your daughter. How do you think she'd react? Full honesty is fine, and the approach my spouse and I took. At times my kids held it over my head a bit, but they knew us better for it and it worked out well for us. I think it might have helped them get a good idea of how the world worked and not to make bad assumptions. The ...


1

You should take it to your parents and explain the situation to them immediately. The only exception is if your parents are particularly unhinged and are going to beat her or throw her out on the street or something for the offense; in that case talk to someone else responsible and trustworthy who can intervene. She is a minor, living in your parents' ...



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