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20

Our dentist made sure to ask, at my child's first visit, whether we let him go to bed with milk or a bottle/sippy cup. He said that he deals with a lot of kids who have rotting teeth due to milk sitting on them all night, and/or badly misaligned teeth due to nighttime sippy-cup chewing. His recommendations were as follows: Children with teeth should be ...


7

My daughter was insistent on taking a drink to bed for a long time, probably from a similar age until she was about 4. Unfortunately, once we'd finally decided to intervene (I think a few months before she turned 3), it was way too late and had reached the stage where it was a pretty fixed routine for her; breaking it was very difficult. Our refusal of a ...


7

It is definitely something you should bring to the pediatrician's attention. It may be normal, but it can also be a sign of diabetes. Also, I caution against giving a child more than a couple cups of soy milk even if they are lactose-intolerant. The evidence is inconclusive but soy phytoestrogens may promote certain types of cancer. Soy milk also does ...


6

Usually the child knows best. As long as he is filling his diapers regularly and not showing any signs of sickness he should be fine. However in this situation I would take the little one to visit a doctor to check for any known diseases with this as a symptom. Maybe he has some problem eating (due to teething etc) and rather drinks a lot then eat a lot. ...


5

As a speech language pathologist, I encourage straw cups over sippy cups! Spouted cups require generally the same oral motor skills as drinking from a nipple. The tongue is positioned forward under the spout.These sucking patterns are more immature and may actually impede the development of a more mature swallow and speech patterns for some children. Also, ...


5

I believe the implication behind your question is that toilet training might be harder if a child is more likely to need to go during the night - and I am not sure that is always right. My own experience with four children (one still going through this process!) leads me to believe it is a mental battle rather than a physical one - my aim was to train our ...


4

We eliminated the evening nursing/bottle by gradually giving solid foods shortly before bedtime in its place and reducing the amount of fluid. I don't think you'll be able to stop the bottle 'cold turkey' without replacing it with some solids, or you'll have a toddler waking in the middle of the night from hunger.


4

We went through a similar stage with our 2-year old (for very similar reasons). I don't think it has caused any particular longer term problems subsequently. We would often go in once she was asleep and remove it, so there wouldn't be any problems with rolling over and waking her up in the wee small hours. We tried to also leave it on the beside ...


4

We discovered that in spite of a sore throat, our infant enjoys eating ice cubes. We thus freeze milk or water into thin ice cubes using an ice cube tray or a small cup, and break it into small pieces to feed the infant. Here is a quote from an adult who tried this method (see link) to treat his own sore throat: For day-time relief, ice-cubes have been ...


3

US Department of Health and Safety has some information: http://www.hhs.gov/safety/bpa/ To reduce the potential transfer of BPA to the foodstuffs: avoid containers not labeled 'bpa-free' (ideal) Of if you don't know: avoid hot foods/liquids in containers avoid scratched containers In general, if safety is a concern, I'd let federal agency/mandatory ...


3

Birth to Five, a book from the UK National Health Service, says that milk or water is okay to drink at night. http://www.nhs.uk/Planners/birthtofive/Pages/Caringforchildsteeth.aspx At bedtime or during the night, give your baby milk or water rather than baby juices or sugar-sweetened drinks. Water is probably better. But there is another reason to ...


3

I would take him to the store and let him pick a couple of cups for milk, "Which cup looks the best for drinking milk?". Then at home, give him an option between the cups, "Would you like milk in the red or blue cup?". He may be more likely to drink milk if he has some control over what he drinks it from.


2

We had a really hard time getting our daughter off of the evening bottle, it got to the point that she would not go to sleep without it and she was rapidly approaching five years old. Thinking about it, we both knew that it wasn't really about the milk, it was more about the feeling of security she got from two places: Suckling Routine Suckling was ...


2

One way is to convince the kid that he/she is just getting too old. You can do this by making some sort of symbolic act to notify this. Works with pacifiers too. In Stockholm people go to the petting zoo and stick the pacifier onto the fence at the to "give it to the small animals" who need it better. Another way is to telling the kid that he/she is too ...


2

I would change the sippy from milk to water as they should be brushing their teeth between milk and bed, and discourage falling asleep with the sippy IN their mouth. Limiting the volume of water in the sippy may be a option as well.


2

I would seriously consider weaning your child from the habit of bringing a cup to bed. If they are coughing at night, a vaporizer or humidifier can do wonders.


2

Don't discourage it for a few reasons. If your kid is going to wet the bed, he or she's going to wet the bed. The reason they wet the bed is because the signal to the brain when he or she has to pee isn't functional (or, functional enough) yet so even a slight tingle would make them pee. [Bed wetting and potty training are totally different issues. Potty ...


1

It's slow, but works. Suggested by our daycare provider (home-based) and later suggested by a pediatrician: spoon-feed the infant.


1

It is important to remember that BPA has been used in everyday plastics, including baby bottles, for decades and absolutely no ill effects in humans have been linked to everyday BPA exposure. The concern with BPA is purely hypothetical, so BPA is avoided in food packaging today out of an overabundance of caution. There are more important things to worry ...


1

Once you start a routine, children that age will begin to insist on it. It took us a long while to wean my son off his requisite "sippy cup at bedtime" and during the process he did have additional trouble with refusing to go to sleep. But we had to do it because, at over 4 years old and fully potty trained for a year and a half, he was occasionally ...


1

I wouldn't discourage taking a sippy cup to bed at all. This could cause unnecessary confrontation. If you're worried about potty training / bed-wetting, the following routine has worked well for us with our 3 potty-trained children. Have them: Drink a big glass of water (or whatever drink) an hour before bedtime Go to the bathroom right before they go to ...



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