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15

Don't give up on having a dog; your son's fear is likely transitory, and there are ways you can help him overcome them. But it will take time and patience. I'm sure there are a number of ways to do this. Here is what I would recommend. Is he able to express yet why he's afraid of dogs? When he is, that will be a help, although he may not be able to ...


10

I think just like you teach your dogs to play nice with other dogs or kids. I don't really see any other thing than just the generic methodology. Maybe you can spend some time with your child and the animals to show how it should be done. If he/she already knows how it 'should be done' and is testing limits, be very clear about what is and what is not nice ...


6

Ok, I'm going to channel Cesar Millan here, bigtime. It would be quite natural for the dogs to see the baby as a pup. Consequence of which is that the baby will have a lower ranking in your pack. The pack is basically what you call family, i.e. you, your partner, any other humans living in your house and any dogs. So it is important that your dogs ...


5

There is something that a teacher told me regarding the interaction between our toddler (3) and our infant (1 year). When the toddler does something to his baby sister that is not terrible but just not nice (like taking away a toy she is holding) you should talk to the toddler about how he hurt the offend-ed's feelings. Since the baby (and in your case ...


4

I suspect it is just another phase of growing up for your son. I say this because our son did exactly the same thing - started out happy and curious about dogs and (suddenly without any cause - we have never had a dog) got scared of them - to the point of screaming and wanting to be picked up when there were any around. At one point he shouted and screamed ...


4

Well, since no one has given this answer yet, I will propose it. My dog (the licker) knows the command no licking! She loves to lick (not obnoxiously, but if I even just compliment her, she wants to lick my hand. She also indicates her desire to play, eat, or go outside with hand licks [plus body language]. And other unknown stuff.) Not liking too much ...


3

My dog was technically still a puppy when we had our son, he was 10 months old, but I made sure before baby came that he was familiar with his room and his stuff, he is a hound so sniffing is what he lives for, so we let him sniff everything. Since I was the one with him all day, I was also worried that he may react to not see me for a couple of days, so ...


2

Your son is very young and has gone from very friendly to fearful in a short time. This more than likely has something to do with the family reaction to the devastating loss of your pet/ family member. Regardless of the cause of the behavior change the best plan to overcome his newfound fear/ irritation is the simplest: pick him up when he runs to you and ...


2

There is some reason for concern, even if your dog seems perfectly well adjusted. Dogs typically respond differently to different kinds of people. A perfectly normal dog may be weary of people with hats, people of a certain gender/age/race/etc. This is the reason that puppys should be introduced to a variety of different types of people during socialization. ...


2

Okay, if you truly want to immediately stop the behavior, you will need to give immediate unpleasant results when he does it. "No Thank You" and other firm verbal commands do work - over time. The child needs to learn what the phrase means before it will have any impact. At this stage in the game, a light tap on the cheek, with a firm "No" will equate ...


2

I have a 3-year old boy and 1.5-year old girl, and a (overall friendly) cat. As infants both kids were rough to the cat, with hair pulling and hitting, although each was different in what they did. Once they could walk, then chasing the cat was a fun activity. They have very little self control and get excited when the animal is around. Each kid is ...


1

I caught my one year and ten month old son, holding a stick and was about to hit the dog. I immediately took the stick away from him, and told him that it is bad to do it. At this age, my son knows what is bad already, so in a way, I was able to channel the information. I also try to show him how to take care of the pet, because toddlers often mimics what ...


1

We were concerned about this as well. We first introduced a blanket or clothes from the hospital that our baby used to get them used to the smell. We had heard this works. When we got home, there was the usual tail wagging and joy at seeing us, but they were for the most part uninterested in the new baby.



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