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7

I would not spend a lot of time and effort "preparing" him - that way you risk building it up in his mind into a big scary thing. A huge part of pain perception is to do with psychological state and expectations of pain - if you expect something to hurt, it will hurt more than if you don't. So: don't mention it until the day, or even until you're setting ...


7

In addition to the all ready fabulous suggestions given above, I just wanted to add this: Whatever tests are run, scans are taken, etc., make sure you get copies for yourself and keep them in an organized place (like a notebook), and anytime you visit a new doctor (or even an old one), take them with you. Shuffling information and data between doctors ...


7

Seek alternate specialists If you've lost confidence in your health care professionals, or if they've dismissed you despite clear signs of a health issue, I'd advise you to seek another health care professional. Get a second, third, or a fourth opinion. There is little else you can do - if a doctor has ran every test, done everything he believes he can to ...


6

First off, the doctor must wash his/her hands after entering the room, period. The doctor opened the door with his hand, right? That's a (major) point of contagion right there. Unless you're in some futuristic practice with automatic doors, I would never excuse the doctor from not washing post-entering the room. Second, unfortunately, doctor handwashing ...


5

Our youngest was "diagnosed" ADD. Turns out he just has a different learning style and is a little boy whose soul needs motion to be happy. So we pulled him from school and he crushes everything he does. That is as long as he can bounce and be upside-down. He does most of his math in his head while bouncing on a trampoline. Point: Be very careful about the ...


5

The key to lessening pain of a vaccination is not to tense up your muscles. I had my kids practice "make your arm soft" and poke them with my finger. It's easy to demonstrate that a simple finger poke hurts more on a tense arm than a soft one. Then just as the doctor or nurse approaches their arm with the needle, remind them "make your arm soft" and it ...


4

Medication noncompliance is an issue with about 70% of schizophrenic patients. There are a number of reasons for this, including: Lack of awareness (I'm not sick, so why should I take medication?). This is biological. Denial (patient knows he is sick but refuses to believe it). This is psychological. Side effects which doctors often underestimate. ...


4

First, you need to calm down about it yourself. Children cue off their parents' reactions. If you're freaked out, he will be too. The mildest disease is 100 times worse than a shot. Second, don't lie about what it will be like, or else every time you go to a doctor he will expect the worst. Tell him the facts without either sensationalizing or ...


4

We always start and end with personal recommendations, but you're right that doing so can be difficult to get for specialities. Read their biography on the hospital web site. How does it compare to their peers on the same staff? Does your pediatrician know the other doc, or just their reputation? Can your pediatrician comment on the facility as a whole? ...


3

I say, in a clear firm tone "please can you wash your hands before continuing?" If I wanted to be delicate I would say "Sorry, but I didn't see you wash your hands. Would you mind doing so before you continue? Thanks." In England it is always acceptable to remind clinicians about hand hygiene and patients are encouraged to do so. I would raise a ...


3

There's a push towards diagnosing children earlier, but medication can be problematic so the recommendation is usually to start with parent training and behavior modification programs. ADHD among preschoolers CHADD is an advocacy group for ADHD and they provide a page with resources for finding a doctor. (Their website provides a lot of general info as ...


2

I definitely concur with getting a second or third opinion. On the personal side, it sounds like a support group (beyond just Parenting at StackExchange) could be really beneficial. I would start with family and close friends for their support. But even with the best of intentions, they may not understand what you are going through. Most communities have ...


2

We see LOTS of specialists for our kids (ENTs, Allergist, Podiatrist, and Pediatric ophthalmologist). There are a few things we've figured out that work for us personally as we've evaluated out options. 1). How long is your child going to need to see this doctor? We were less selective about the doc who put in our daughter's ear tubes who was only going ...


2

When I need an annual flu shot or other vaccination, I like to bring my son with me (schedule permitting) so he can watch. Seeing me go through it, understand that we all have to do it, and that it's not a big deal or especially painful, makes it less of an anxiety when he needs to have one himself. We also discussed often (even at age 4) the purpose of ...


1

I would ask in a curious, not attacking way something like : "Don't you need to use these?" (pointing at the sanitizer) "I always thought doctors offices were really picky about those..."


1

You could try asking on Facebook. I've found a few good doctors that way, although it may not work as well for a less common specialty. There are also usually Mom forums in the bigger cities where you can ask for recommendations of doctors.


1

If you trust your current pediatrician, they can likely give you good referrals to local specialists. IMO the best recommendations come from health care professionals, particularly when they are not "working" for you. Do you have any friends or family members who are nurses or doctors? Ask them who they would go to; even if they don't know the specialists ...



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