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Wow, it's playing with fire to put children in the middle of these things like that. There are so many landmines in a breakup already without the added nonsense. My parents split up when I was young and I remember some of the doubts or fears that I had. When my ex and I broke up we did our utmost to protect them from any those fears. Obviously, that is not ...


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Personally, based solely upon what you've said, I think the mother-in-law is the problem. Maybe you should very gingerly find out how your husband feels about limiting her time with the child. She seems to have already caused disharmony in the household. That's COMPLETELY unethical on her part, in my opinion. If the mother-in-law is the cause, I think your ...


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My five yr daughter does the same thing except for the biting and spitting and hitting. She throws herself around and screams no. I designed a behavior chart for her and let her help, it has committed tags that we use to let her know where she stands with her behavior all through out the day. Red is for bad behavior, yellow is for caution watch your behavior,...


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I agree that 4 is very young. My oldest is very interested in writing and reading. He didn't get homework, and I don't think you need to practice 'doing homework'. Personally I think it is time to do it later. If you want to practice letters though, incorporate them in something fun that shows WHY you write them. My son really loved signing his name on ...


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IMO 4 years old is far too young to consider homework. When I was in grammar school, homework was work not completed in class (and there was plenty of time given). Rather than treating these packets as homework, try incorporating it as part of your one on one time activities. Make a game of writing the letters and give her time to instruct you as well. ...


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According to research, homework for preschoolers is an educational trend without any real benefits to the child. Of course, that doesn't mean her school will be responsive to that point of view. However, given that, I wouldn't push her too hard, there's some evidence that can be counterproductive.


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I upvoted almost all the answers so I feel bad for accepting my own. But I finally got through to him about 6 months ago. Basically I grounded him from everything, and he still wasn't doing his homework. I found out he had a couple of Cs and told them if they weren't Bs that football was done. What surprised me is that about 2 weeks of ground him into ...


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What you describe makes me think that she is not only starving for attention, but for physical contact. Is there anyway that besides the 'chores' you do with her, you can do something that involves snuggling? Like watching a family movie, reading a book to/with her. You might want to think of her need of physical contact and attention in terms of a ...


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I work in a school and the way we deal with this type of behaviour is to remind the child that they must use "kind hands" when playing with their friends. We set clear rules that if "kind hands" aren't used the child will then be removed from playing with their friend for 5 minutes and have to sit in silence away from everyone. Then they are introduced back ...


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Get her father to take her one weekend day per week without you, so you have time to recharge. After all, she's his daughter, not yours, even though you seem to be doing a much better job at parenting than her actual parents are.


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My twins are always figuring out new ways to mess with each other. They're 29 months. Bedtime has always been hard. Whenever you change your strategy you should give it a week, 4 days minimum to see if there's any difference. You could brute force it over and over, keep telling them it's not time for games, it's time for sleep, and lead them by the hand ...



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