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1

Poor growth, constipation and irritability could point to Celiac disease. It sometimes takes years to reach a level of advancement where it can be detected in blood tests. Even if he has tested negative in the past, it may be worth requesting at each yearly check up. It took over a decade for my diagnosis, because my doctors were busy trying to treat each ...


0

I exhibited similar behaviour at around the same age and my mum discovered the problem was related to food additives which at the time were in everything imaginable (and quite a lot of stuff you didn't expect like peas). We have the E-Numbers system here (UK) which classifies food additives and labelling laws which state they must be listed where used. ...


3

The entire family is suffering here; you have my sympathy. Raising a temperamental child is difficult, but you can change things. This has been going on for a long time now, and it will be very difficult to correct the dynamics without a lot of help and support. I have a few recommendations, but you might need professional help from a family therapist if you ...


2

It's great that you are discussing behavior and offering rewards, but at his age, the consequence for his actions needs to be immediate or he will not adjust his behavior. Have you ever heard of "Love and Logic"? It is a parenting program that I've found very useful with my own temper-prone child. Here are the basics: Understand that children learn how to ...


2

This is still getting views, so I thought I would post my own follow-up answer. In retrospect, it was quite obvious that his behavior issues were much more frequent than most children. Rather than adjusting to the rules and eventually settling in like his classmates, our son's behavior issues at school increased in severity and frequency. A year later, he ...


4

It looks like you have 2 issues: 1) Food 2) Behavior I think it might be helpful for you to separate the 2 issues in your mind and in you actions. Maybe you can work on one at a time? 1) For the food issue, does his pediatrician say he is not growing as he needs to? If not, then every recommendation I have heard says to let kids be in charge of how ...


1

Immediate consequences are important. I stop right where we are. Sit on the floor and tell them my lap is your time out chair. You may have to move to the side of the aisle in the store. so people don't trip over you.


0

My guideline in raising kids is that consequences must feel a "natural" consequence. That is, the kid must not feel punished, but feel like that whatever hits it after it had done something "wrong" is a natural, physically deterministic consequence of what it did. Retribution has no place in this. If you cannot undelete what you have deleted by having ...


2

Maybe you could try alternatives to time-out. I'm the parent of a toddler and I'm having a hard time figuring out what I would put my child in time-out for at this age. Most things she does that are "wrong" (against the rules) are also developmentally appropriate, i.e. she is curious or frustrated or whatever, not disobedient. Some strategies that work for ...


1

You say you've tried time outs. I wonder if you've employed a systematic approach to this. 1-2-3 Magic is one of (if not the) most effective approaches to behavioral (self-) correction I've ever encountered. When applied correctly and consistently, it allows time outs to be applied without the parent losing their cool (very important, especially if younger ...


6

Yes, a saved game might seem like a trivial loss to an adult. In fact, I purposely destroy mine after a certain point, because I enjoy the challenge of having limited resources again. However, kids use the trivial things to learn how to handle the big things. Saved games also represent a significant investment of time, so treating them as valuable ...


3

In most situations, if the act is unintentional and there aren't dangerous consequences, I think the appropriate punishment is to make the kid apologize for what they did. In this case, it's just a game, so that seems like an appropriate punishment to me. It's also reinforcing the proper way to handle a situation when you unintentionally do something that ...


12

It's always important to make sure that discipline and punishment don't become tools that the kids use against each other. Having a punishment of one child shouldn't be a reward to the other. The other thing that raises a red flag here is the fact that you state it was unintentional. I'm not sure that punishing someone for an accident is a proper precedent ...


3

I'd ask the erasee how much time will it take him to reach the same progress in that game, multiply it by 1,5 and make that amount of time his exclusive, solo play time. The child which erased the saves should not be able to play until that time passed, unless the other kid allowed him to play coop - but still never allow solo play even if the other kid ...



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