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I work in a school and the way we deal with this type of behaviour is to remind the child that they must use "kind hands" when playing with their friends. We set clear rules that if "kind hands" aren't used the child will then be removed from playing with their friend for 5 minutes and have to sit in silence away from everyone. Then they are introduced back ...


1

Get her father to take her one weekend day per week without you, so you have time to recharge. After all, she's his daughter, not yours, even though you seem to be doing a much better job at parenting than her actual parents are.


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My twins are always figuring out new ways to mess with each other. They're 29 months. Bedtime has always been hard. Whenever you change your strategy you should give it a week, 4 days minimum to see if there's any difference. You could brute force it over and over, keep telling them it's not time for games, it's time for sleep, and lead them by the hand ...


2

It seems painfully obvious that this little girl is starved for attention. The fact that you are not able to give her as much as she wants just leads her to be more clingy and needy, which, in turn leads you to push her away more. I can totally understand your frustration. I am an extremely introverted person also, and one of the most difficult things for ...


2

That child is desperate to feel loved. It is quite obvious she gets almost no attention at her mom's house, as she is developmentally behind. I would encourage you and her Dad to spend time with her. Do not put her in the same situation as with her Mom. A child is not just some nuisance to be dealt with until they are out of the house--sometimes it feels ...


1

Her reactions are a learned behavior. She has learned that most of the time if she reacts a certain way, she will get what she wants. It is a painful process (mentally and emotionally) to undo a learned behavior like that, but it will be worth it in the long run. First, make sure you do not get into a "dispute" with her. When two people get into a dispute, ...


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The very first advice could be, don't scold or punish him for this Try to know the reason, don't pump them for information as soon as they come from school. When he is relaxed, ask what made him happy/sad in school that day. Know if he is bullied. Watch him carefully, observe if there are any changes in his mood, behavior, opinion about school. Kids ...


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I don't think I can be of much help since I don't remember why I was such a headache when I was 8. But I have a few things I could say that might be worth considering. Whenever I was reprimanded harshly, I reacted even worse, while whenever I was reprimanded calmly, sometimes with a tone of sad disappointment (usually from my grandfather), although ...


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Easy technical solution: Make "the picker" wear these: https://www.rhinix.com/ Ask me later about effects on the long run, when he stops wearing them ;)


4

Not knowing your son I can only speculate, but the whole description sorta hits home with me, so here's my stab into the dark and advice: He's probably incredibly bored by school. I know second hand that Japanese schools don't have particularly inventive teaching methods, and he's probably bored by sitting and listening all day to a teacher who may not be ...


2

It is easy to forget that children are people also, and need to feel like they have power over their lives. Being powerless is not fun. By dragging his feet in the morning/night time routines, he is exercising the only power he feels he has at that time. Give him choices. Children also need to experience consequences. It is also easy for us parents to think ...


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Firstly, let's start with waking him up. You could try: Getting an alarm clock that starts 15 minutes before he needs to wake up. Make the alarm stop after like 10 seconds. This should get him conscious, basically preparing him to be able to wake up. During this time, call him periodically but not in a forcing manner. Anger will result in distress and it'...


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Best story I heard in this regard was of a guest visiting his adult friend at the friend's home. Friend's children were all over the place misbehaving etc. Friend just let it go on. Guest made it clear to the children that he would not let it go on, first with verbal warning, secondly by moving to the edge of his seat. In short, he was clear and credible ...


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Raising up kids in today's time in anyways a challenging task for parents and it can make things worse even more if you are handling a stubborn or angry child. To make them control parents need patience while dealing with them. I suggest you when your child is angry or behaving badly you should not argue during that time. If you argue the situation make more ...


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Hmmm... As Stephanie above has mentioned, this is pretty much what a kid of this age will do (give or take a few behaviours!). I'm providing a perspective from my own experience. Hope it helps you out! Being from India, I get your angle probably a bit better than most here. However, please forgive me if I've read your situation in the wrong manner. One ...


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Sounds like you're beyond frustrated with your son. And for good reasons! Although they may seem out of the ordinary and even unruly behaviors, what you're describing are actually age appropriate behaviors for a 5 year old. At 5 years old your son is learning how to interact with the world and push his limits. It's your job as the parent to set and follow-...


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Interesting enough I've had this same issue w a few children. I have a question, how much attention are you giving this? I mean in regards to how upset you are getting or if it's turned into a daily stressor that your son can expect as soon as he gets home. Children this age don't care about the concept of friends like adults might. They have no concept ...



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