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3

A related question is Teenage daughter and stepfather and reading that you can see that teenagers invoke similar emotions in the adults who have to deal with them, even when other things about the family are different. Let me suggest a few things for you to try: don't expect her to adore the new babies. You adore them, her father adores them, strangers on ...


4

You ask if she is a bad influence on your twins. The answer is no, not at this point, because their powers of observation are not so sharp that they will learn behaviors from her.


1

She is a child that has had her family torn apart, she may partly blame you, even if that is unfair. Ultimately the burden of responsibility for building a positive relationship is upon your shoulders, it probably won't be easy, even with out the cultural issues they are never easy, but it is going to be a lot harder if your primary concern is that her ...


-1

According to my 24 years experience of consultancy, punishment is not necessary lot of other method to control bad habits of child of any age e.g if she ask for wearing short skirt in early age of school, so first you completely defined her about this action, and at the same time find some good videos of good spokesman/spokeswoman about this issue and share ...


2

There isn't one list of these things, because it isn't a settled issue: different strategies work to more or less extent, in particular per child. One minute per year of age is a common length for timeouts; 123 Magic suggests that, for example (there isn't an online direct source, but any search for 123 Magic will come up with a similar summary such as this ...


4

One minute per age of the child. A five year old child gets a five minute (or less) time out. A fourteen year old child has a fifteen minute withdrawal of privileges. Some people think that this is much too short for the older child, but research shows that a shorter duration for removal of privileges is more effective than a longer duration. It's really ...


2

Part of raising a healthy (behavior-wise) child is finding that happy medium between allowing them assert some independence, but at the same time teaching them that they must operate within a particular boundary. Just like I can't pick my start time for work, they can't pick their bedtime. But I can choose things like my route, what I wear, the color of my ...


1

In the case below, "it," is an action or behavior that is undesired/wrong. Blackmailing is: The person who did "it" knows they did something wrong. You know the person did "it," and that "it" is wrong. The person who did "it" knows that you know. Blackmailing--> You coerce behavior from the person who did "it" by threatening to expose the the person for ...


4

My principle is to try to stick to "natural consequences". That is, I do not punish my children in a way that makes me seem to be peeved, and therefore I punish them. Rather than that, I focus on why I want to correct my children's behavior, and try to let them feel what the consequences are if they behave incorrect. Mostly that's just not shielding the ...


4

I think that what your sister is getting at is the distinction between several kinds of discipline. Let's say that I want my child (let's call him Tommy) to eat a healthy dinner. How can I do that? "Tommy, if you eat (all of) your spinach, I'll let you have a cookie." "Tommy, if you don't eat your spinach, you can't have a cookie." These are inverses ...


2

The only really bad thing would be to threaten a punishment that you don't intend to carry through on or that is disproportionate to the offense. Punishment is not blackmail. The law does not blackmail us in to not stealing from other people. It tells us that if we do bad thing x, bad thing y will happen to us. This is a natural and important part of ...


13

The thing is, it sounds like blackmailing, but you are teaching that actions have consequences. "If you don't go to bed now you will be tired tomorrow" is a fact; however one that children won't get. Tomorrow is ages away and child cares mostly about now. But you actually know more about the child than it does when it is small, so you need to be able to ...


2

You can't let children do whatever they want to do because they don't know what needs to be done...that's why they are children. That you even ask the question suggest that you think of the child as just a small adult, able to balance conflicting desires, understand long term consequences and make decisions leading to an optimal outcome. Well, they can't, ...


3

I agree with what others have said, time outs can be effective, and seems appropriate in the context, and you should not feel bad about him crying. I always give my kid a hug and 'I love you' after a time out - talking to him making clear his behavior was bad, but he is not a bad kid. In addition, I would suggest that you talk to him about appropriate ...


3

This is the method that my wife and i use with our son and began using this method around 18 months old. Our son is now almost 3 and rarely misbehaves. The trick is to make sure that they complete the entire time, and if they get up before the time is up, the time restarts. Once the time is up, fully explain why he was given the time out, and inform them ...


4

It sounds to me like your discipline approach is working. A "time out" or "naughty corner" is supposed to be a punishment and if your child is crying, it suggests they don't like the experience. The goal here is to associate the bad behaviour with the negative consequences of discipline. It is likely he won't continue to cry each time you use this approach, ...


10

Hitting is common at this age, but that (or his tears) does not mean a time-out is inappropriate; on the contrary, the sooner he learns that hitting is not an acceptable form of self expression, the better off all involved will be. Just because he does not talk yet doesn't mean he doesn't understand a significant number of words. He should know many ...


4

In my opinion this is a correct way to discipline the child. We even put our 1 year old in the playpen when he misbehaves badly. We always make sure we tell him why. Although we're not sure he understand it completly, he now sometimes stop when we tell him to.


3

We've considered this for my three year old (and will probably think more about this for my 18 month old, as he's just lost his crib rail). We had all sorts of problems with his bedtimes, probably as bad as what you describe, even back at 18-24 months. What we realized over time was that his schedule wasn't centered on the times that we'd like. It seems ...


1

You are far too nice, and your 7-YO has learned, subconsciously, to manipulate you to get what she wants. Be clear that after 9pm is your time, she will get nothing other than directions back to bed. She is not hungry - you saw her eat dinner. She is not thirsty (leave a bottle of water in the bedroom to halt this complaint) and at 7 she can use the ...


28

3 years old is a prime time for children to assert their independence, developmentally they understand they are separate entities from everyone else. With some kids, choices are key. Many are extremely motivated to do something as long as it is in their own way. I would recommend that you don't allow her to decide for herself, but give her meaningful ...


4

Children are generally able to handle much more freedom than modern parents give them credit for. Usually a bad result when you first try granting more freedom is due to a lack of practice, out of rebellion more than anything else. Just because a child wants control over her own body doesn't mean she won't tend to make similar choices to the ones you would ...


11

The only harm that might come of allowing your child to choose when to get ready for bed is that they might not get enough sleep, and they might develop poor sleep habits. As long as you place a reasonable limit to how late she can choose so she gets plenty of sleep at night, then there's no reason you can't let her choose. In my experience, however, ...


5

Some people hate the idea of having to follow a structured routine. I'm not sure how you present the breakdown of the evening to her, but if it's at all an ordered sequence of events, she may simply not care about it or she might want to break out of it. Either way, I'd say the root of the problem is you don't have her 'buy in'. She likely doesn't quite ...


3

I personally don't think there is any harm. There may even be benefits, especially when she is older. It starts the idea of respect and independence, generally not something you work on with a three year old, but I don't think there is nothing wrong with that. I would take on the advice of others allow leeway as long as she understands the repercussions. ...


5

Agreeing on a routine together is important. We have used sticker charts to great effect in our house when if, for example, they go to bed nicely 5 days they get a treat. Then you can focus on the "Next we will do the and let's see if we can do that well too as you might get a sticker tonight" so it's a positive thing. We have found that battling with our ...


23

Giving some freedom won't hurt. But make sure you are confortable with whatever she comes up. Preferably it shouldn't be her deciding, you should come up with an "evening plan" together. A good trick is to discuss the problem, reach a consensus, and write down what you decided together on a sheet of paper, then hang the sheet somewhere visible. She can't ...


1

Offer an incentive to do something extremely boring: Reading from a Chemistry, Math, Philosophy textbook Listening to a poetry audiobook Any Netflix tv show on Quantum physics Beats the heck out of counting sheep, but if it actually stimulates her mind instead of putting her to sleep: you get a genius! You can't lose.


0

My 7 year old doesn't sleep well but I find that this works. I recommend you give her a bath at 7pm to relax her as a shower will wake her up. Then it is time for you and the baby until 7:30. Then take your daughter up to bed after teeth brushing for story time and a cuddle, just you and her. She shouldn't have any food after brushing her teeth or before ...


29

I would say that teaching children about a healthy diet is a great first step. But on the same note, some of the foods that are really healthy (whole grains, deep green vegetables) are gassy foods. As for gas sneaking out during practice. I (late 20s) take an adult (mom-grandma ages) yoga class and sometimes during those stretches gas sneaks out. I ...


0

As a music teacher, I give the following hints: 1: Make sure that your Ideas about what and how he/she should practice are in line with your teachers. 2: if the child is younger than 8, he/she may just not be old enough to be deeply engaged. Ease up, until about 8 years old. 3: If you push too hard (how much that is is decided by the child, sorry) the ...


2

I motivated my daughter to practice clarinet by playing with her. We got some duets and played together. Even now (20 years later) when she comes home we'll go in the cellar and do those duets again, loving every minute. I suppose this is a bit tricky with a piano, but... there are tunes for four hands, right? And maybe he could accompany you (or his mates) ...


2

I mostly agree with anongoodnurse's answer (+1 from me), and would add: Between 2 and 4 is the phase where children learn to deal with the frustration of not getting something they want, and where they can be very demanding, impulsive, and sometimes violent. However, that doesn't mean they are evil or mean. They just have to learn how to do that thing ...


8

Toddlers this age (and younger) bite. That's just a fact. Most of them outgrow it fairly unceremoniously. They bite for a number of reasons, three of which are 1) reaction, 2) attention, and 3) frustration. Usually this frustration stems from not being able to "use their words" to adequately express their frustration. To combat this, show him all the time ...



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