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23

Yes you can wait. Unless you can't be interrupted (like when you're driving), you should change the diaper "reasonably fast," meaning within ten minutes or so during the daytime. That's a very rough guideline though. Here are some considerations: It varies how well children handle nighttime diaper changes. If you can change during the night, do it. ...


23

In short, you have to be a ninja. Boys are much better at getting money shots than girls (my nephew got me in the ear as I turned my head to shield my eyes). What you have to do is have a towel in one hand, as you take the diaper off with the other. Place the towel (can also just be the new diaper, but you'll usually end up changing twice) over the ...


17

You are dealing with two issues here: stool toileting refusal and the associated constipation. Constipation: Your doctor is probably recommending an enema because an impaction is preventing defecation at this point. I have an acquaintance who has had success in this same situation using a commercial suppository that is administered by eyedropper – you ...


12

We had lots of diaper leaks in the beginning, and we tried a few different brands until we found one that worked well. As our infant grew, the story repeated itself and we switched to a different brand again. Try a few, and see if that helps. Every brand and every size is different, and not all fit perfectly. Also, make sure that the edges of the diapers ...


12

One possibility is that the diaper is the wrong size. Diaper leaks sometimes indicate that it is time to move on to a larger diaper (it can also indicate that the diaper is too big, but that should be fairly self-evident from putting the diaper on). For a 2 week old, though, this seems unlikely. Another reason for leaks is that the diaper is not being ...


12

Duct Tape (aka Duck Tape). We actually had to do that a couple times. Of course be sure you check on your son frequently, because he may have an aversion to having the stinky diaper on - he may be developing a diaper rash. Also be sure the tape doesn't get on his skin as it will probably irritate his skin. Our son got through it after a while and we didn't ...


11

Most of the time it's okay to just put the clean diaper right back on. If it's too moist too often, he will get a rash, but usually that's more due to waiting too long to change rather than putting a new diaper on too soon. Make sure to clean all the urine off so the moisture is just from the wipe. You can use some baby powder if it starts to bother him, and ...


11

With a newborn, you can certainly wait. Ten minutes, as Torben sais, is a good measure. Note that this doesn't mean you should always wait that long. From my own experience, this changes once you start introducing solid foods, which is usually around six months of age. Solid faeces are much more prone to irritate the skin, so changing the diaper quickly ...


11

I do a body block by leaning across the baby's belly (without any weight being put on the baby) until I've got things cleaned up, up front. It also prevents the child rolling over and escaping the area where I am doing the changing. I can then move to a better angle for being certain I've got the back end fully cleaned up while knowing that at least the ...


10

Urine smell comes from urea that is converted to ammonia by bacteria. Ammonia is a gas that can easily permeate through many textiles, and some plastics, too. So the smell being noticeable from the outside is not necessarily a sign of actual (liquid) leakage. Ammonia can attach itself to all sorts of surfaces by a process called adsorption, which explains ...


10

Potty training is so fun with kids. It's one step forward, two steps back, three steps forward, a shuffle to the side... In short, this sounds like one of the usual stops along the route towards full potty training. I don't see that you're doing anything wrong. Have you tried to talk with her about it? I don't know how verbal she is; my daughter was VERY ...


10

Three ideas (one you might not like, but if it works...): Make sure he goes to the bathroom just before bed. Did wonders for our daughter. Try some higher-absorbency pullups. Since he's almost 6, maybe move to GoodNights or something similar for older kids with bladder control issues. You might just be overloading the capacity of the diaper. If you can ...


10

I opted for the lavatory when we took my son on a plane. I should mention that I'm a pretty big guy: 6'3" or roughly 190cm. Standing in that lavatory, hunched over the rudimentary changing table... let's just say it wasn't fun. Or comfortable. Yet I'm not convinced in the seat would be any better, even if you ignore the issue of consideration for your ...


9

There exists a UK study dating from 2005, which was updated in 2008. A good summary can be found at the Kimberly-Clark Australia and New Zealand homepage. To summarise the summary: It depends... If you are always washing the fabric diapers at 95 °C and put them in the dryer, the overall energy use will be higher than if you use disposable diapers. If you ...


9

I hate to say this (and I SWEAR it's not a pun) but it depends. For our daughter, pull-ups were more of a hassle than they were worth. She treated them like a diaper and was not interested in going into big-kid undies until we took them away and replaced them with training panties (the thick kind that can be soiled without causing a level 4 hazmat ...


8

How much time to air: After cleaning, you can dab off the skin with a soft towel (paper is likely to irritate more than cloth). If the skin still feels a little moist, it takes only 30 seconds to air-dry, and then you can put the new diaper on. You can also softly pat the skin with the back of your hand to speed up the air-drying. Especially with newborns, ...


8

Take a one-piece pajama, the sort with long arms and legs, but without feet, that has a zipper running from one leg to the top, and put it on backwards. It's completely tamper-proof, easy to "service", and ought to be equally comfortable. We have tried many of the other suggestions (diaper backwards, onesie, onesie plus some kind of trousers, "duck" tape, ...


8

As Valkyrie said, no child goes to college in diapers. Don't put too much pressure on yourself or her as that tends to make things worse. If she has an accident, just gently remind her that pee pee and poop go in the potty--which she knows all ready, but you know how often you have to remind kids about stuff! Then find a way that she can help you clean up ...


7

Sorry, I couldn't help laughing out loud :-) Been there, done that, but the pants thing has always worked for us. Sometimes easier said than done, but you can try moving nap time so he can finish it with a clean diaper, or maybe try a heavier duty/more absorbent brand. It sounds like he's just uncomfortable.


7

Some babies are extremely sensitive, and will cry about the slightest wetness. Some babies will have a huge soaking blowout in the middle of the night and barely make a peep. We've had both ways. If you're lucky, your baby will be somewhere in between. Newborns wake up to get fed a lot, so generally you'll be just fine if you check the diaper just before ...


6

He is taking the diaper off because he is uncomfortable. BIG SIGNAL that is time to potty train and a really good reason not to force him to stay in it. How well do you sleep if you are uncomfortable anyway? Ask him to sit on the potty about 15 minutes before naptime. While he sits, read stories, play clapping games, sing songs etc so that it is fun to ...


6

Diaper-free time is good. We used to put our newborn on a soft blanket to air out and "play" for a little while before dressing her up for bed. The only caveat is sensitive skin. We always had some sort of layer between her and carpet, simply because we have 2 dogs and 2 cats and didn't want any additional skin irritation to happen.


6

The rate skin develops a rash is in direct proportion to the acidic level of the feces. It's the mixture of water and acid that causes skin irritation. So if the baby is having solid and dryer movements, then you can wait, but wet material or anything that might be caused by diarrhea needs to be changed immediately. The faster the food flows thru the bowls ...


6

A couple of tips I was given years ago: open the diaper, let the air drift in, wait a couple of minutes, then change it. (Or, if you're in a hurry, open the diaper and let a breeze in for a few seconds, but be prepared to cover again.) I was also told that changing a baby on their stomach works, but that's obvious and may not be good diapering practice, ...


6

In general, an hour or two between changes is fairly typical. It takes a while to produce more urine or feces, so you can expect more than 15 minutes before diaper changes. Waiting for the infant to cry is not perfectly reliable, because some children don't seem to mind wet diapers -- my youngest finds a wet diaper to be pure torture, my oldest couldn't ...


6

Is he able to articulate at all why he's scared to poop? (Our daughter was afraid of what happened to the poop after it was flushed. Once she groked that she was good to go.) Finding the reason for his fear will probably go a long way towards you finding a solution for this problem. Maybe try the book It Hurts When I Poop. Did wonders for my nephew with ...


6

Take option 1. First, let the other passengers waiting know what are doing. Make sure that both parents go to the bathroom. One parent stands outside supplying wipes, a bag for the poopy nappy, etc etc, the other does the dirty work. Make sure you have plenty of wipes, a plastic bag for the nappy, a bag for any clothes that get soiled, a fresh change of ...


5

Newborns need to be checked and changed much more frequently than older babies, simply because they poo more often. For the first few weeks, you can expect some poo in almost every nappy / diaper, and should check every half hour or so if they're awake, probably changing once every 2 or 3 hours. If they're asleep I wouldn't bother waking them up to check / ...


5

The first answer post is right on the money. Definitely use the in plane lavatory if your baby #2s during the flight. I found it helpful that I had an extra swaddling blaket to lay down on the changing surface. One of my flights did not have a fold down changing table which made it a little more difficult, but all parents learn to improvise. My advice is to ...


4

I believe the indicator simply reacts to moisture, not urine specifically. If you're prepared to sacrifice a diaper, you could simply test it with water. When my son was born, the hospital had Pampers diapers with a wetness indicator. When "off" it was invisible, and when the diaper was wet (used), a vertical blue line appeared on the outside of the diaper. ...



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