Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Is it better to make decisions for him, like I did with the clothes above, or to let him muddle around for a while? My wife and I are both not great 'deciders', so we'd like to give him the best shot at learning how to be decisive. I wouldn't worry at this stage about whether he's going to turn out indecisive as an adult. Consider that giving him the ...


2

This is a guess. I'm wondering if it might be a situation where he made the following two, distinct cognitive steps: (1) A while back, he developed the understanding that he could choose things. Make decisions. Affect the outcome. Make his will known, and have it followed. This is a big, important thing to understand, and it gives him control over his ...


2

A couple of resources I haven't seen anyone mention: If you live near a university/college you can check out their chapter of ACM (Association for Computing Machinery) and see if they have any high school outreach activities going on. Even if they don't they may allow a mature middle/high school student to join their general meetings. Civil Air Patrol - ...


3

See http://www.boba.com/our-position-on-position and http://welladjustedbabies.com/are-baby-carriers-safe/ Being in a supported upright position, as in babywearing with the baby facing the parent, is a GOOD idea for many, many reasons. The vestibular system gets developed by the baby responding to the parent's movements and turns; Hips are kept within ...


1

When I was a kid my Father told me that he would help me buy anything I wanted as long as I saved up half of the funds first. I think this really alleviated a lot of the burden of guilt for him not buying me things I was interested in. For one, it put everything I wanted or thought I wanted into a que of, "How much am I actually interested in this?" If I ...


9

My parents supported my interests with very limited funds. Yes, some items can be very expensive. However, there are also inexpensive items that you can get a lot of use out of. Also, there is something to be said for the challenge of using limited resources, even if you can afford better. I still take this approach with supplies with my own children. ...


1

Two routes I would take. First, encourage your child to earn his/her own money to buy these kits. There are lots of ways to do that as a child, mowing lawns, babysitting, doing odd jobs, gardening, etc. Then you combine two lessons in one. Offer to match his/her earnings, if you can do that, or some other incentive from your end. Second, if you have a ...


0

It is certainly true that there are educational opportunities that are expensive: special programs, summer camps, supplies and equipment that you could buy, etc. But there's a lot of educational opportunity that costs very little. One of the best ways to learn anything remains, "read a book". Books are not all that expensive, and you can get many for free ...


2

I would suggest that you reach out to some STEM teachers in your area. They may know of some opportunities in your area. If there isn't anything, then you could start an after-school club, or summer program. You can recruit volunteers who can provide the technical guidance, and do some fundraising. In other words, you would be in sort of a manager role. ...


2

The cheek biting can be a transient tic. With tics, the more you try to legislate, the more entrenched it can get. When you get involved in a fairly pointless tug-of-war, it can be very effective to gently let go of the rope. There are a couple of ways you can turn this so that your son gets some aspects of maturation while still satisfying his sensory ...


2

It sounds like he's had some stressful changes in his life. He has been using a method of self-soothing that's working for him, but working less well for you. Putting it into perspective a little bit, he can continue to bite the inside of his cheek, which not only predisposes him to canker sores, but can actually cause cancer (in a few decades, if he ...


1

We took my daughter's pacifier away when she was almost 3 (my son never got attached to one). We told her weeks in advance that we'd hang it on the Christmas Tree and Santa would leave an extra present in exchange. We reminded her frequently so it wouldn't be a surprise and she could mentally prepare for it. She cried a bit on Christmas Eve and missed it ...


2

I am Indian. In India, co-sleeping is common, and children can hear parents having sex. Children don’t know what is bad or good. If they see their parents having sex, and the parents don’t freak out or panic, then I think the child will not panic as either. Consider if a child saw his mom/dad taking a bath. If mom/dad tells their child. “honey, do you want ...


2

There is a great difference between "recognize" and "understand". Recognizing one's shadow can happen as early as few months old, as this other answer implies. Then at later age, kids can start playing with their shadows, and other people shadows they see. However, the real question should be: "when children actually understand the concept of shadows?" and ...


1

My son is 5 months and he just recognized his shadow on the wall... When he seen it he flapped his arm up and down to see if it would move with him again then he did it again and then he laughed...



Top 50 recent answers are included