Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Essentially, calendar age is a much simpler metric than weight and physical activity. It therefore is a simpler guideline for parents to follow, particularly if your child is out of infancy and going for longer stretches between pediatric checkups. If I am curious how much sleep a ten-month-old should get and I want to research the question, I easily know ...


3

Practicality. Not every baby is going to be the same, and guidelines for one baby are never going to be perfect for another baby with the same attribute, regardless of what you decide to base it off of. Age tends to be used as a baseline because it's the only abstract thing that all babies do equally - age. Say for your example you have two babies ...


-1

Okay. Same situation. Smart child with straight "A" Grades. TV set is put in.his room. The child is overjoyed. Child: I wanna watch some more Tv. Mum : No dear. You wont be able to wake up and will feel sleepy in.school. Child : okay but I want to still watch tv. Mum: Ok.. Then goodnite and try to sleep early Child : Yeah... ( but watches till 2 in the ...


0

Lego Duplo are building blocks sized for toddlers, so I figured Lego probably publishes some Duplo games. Turns out they do! I found one and from there just clicked onward on the "related apps" that were listed.


1

I got the Discovery Animal Alphabet Video app for my 2-year old. There are several videos so that may help. I haven't tried the music yet but that may be another possibility. Pick music or videos that teach something and you are good to go. Aside from Mr. Pencil and playing with the pet it was all over her head until I discovered these. She never watches the ...


7

I agree with the answers already posted, but let me add a few thoughts. I recall seeing a TV program not long ago where the narrator said that parents shouldn't dictate sexual morality to their teenage children, but should let them make these decisions for themselves because "then they will own the decision". And I thought, Yes, great, except the ...


1

The 11 year old wants a drink because the 17 year old got one. Not because he wants a drink, or because of a wish for fairness, but because she got one. Fairness is all nice. But "if she gets something, he gets the same thing automatically" is not fairness. "She got something that she wanted, and one day you will get something you want" is fairness. Let's ...


11

I think you are missing something important. The negative consequences must be both relatively swift and have to be actually considered negative by the child! This particular scenario of yours is very real, but I think is a very bad example of letting children experience the effects of their decisions. Look at it from the child's perspective: he got to ...


7

I think it's a great idea to let kids make decisions when they can. However, to let a child decide on important things without realizing that in many instances the child will pick what brings him instant gratification isn't really teaching him well. Better to let kids take increased responsibility as they are able to appreciate long-term consequences. In ...


24

Most parents try to do it that way when they can. The main thing you're missing is that children live in the moment, to a much larger degree than most adults realize until they have kids of their own. The further removed the consequence is from the decision, the less influence it has on their next decision. For your bedtime example, it would take a ...


5

here's a game I made up: take 10 3-letter nouns of things around the house -- bed, tub, mat, cat, etc -- and print them out on your printer in fairly large (36pt) type. attach each word to the object in the house, or an object that represent its ('cat' went on the cat bowl) then print one sheet of paper with all 10 words on it, and tape it up at kid's ...


3

I've got a three year old in a similar situation: can often tell parts of the story, sometimes verbatim, but isn't ready to read yet. I'm tempted to push him harder, because by this age I'd learned to read (and enjoyed it a lot even at this age), but it's apparent to me that he isn't really ready yet to be pushed harder. Following his individual learning ...


6

I've done quite a bit of research about teaching children to read, because we are homeschooling my two daughters who don't read yet, one of which has severe brain damage. The ideal age to learn to read appears to be between 7 and 9 years of age, which is when children typically teach themselves to read if they have been read to frequently, the same way they ...


7

This is based on my experience with my son, who is 3.5 and does not read yet. You can start by teaching him to recognize letters. Alphabet books, blocks and lots of other toys have letters on them. You can also point out letters in your environment (signs). Also teach the sound the letter make - I think this is probably more important than the name of the ...


34

I take what I consider to be a pragmatic approach: if there is no toy which is obviously a gun, kids just make their own (60-80% of boys, 30% of girls, play with "aggressive toys" of some variety). Fingers, sticks, coat hangers (which double as pretty decent fighter planes and space ships, IMHO), pencils/pens, cardboard tubes (packing tubes make great ...


5

Consider you answered your own question, you turned out okay, rationally recognizing the inherent dangers. There are important, legitimate, appropriate, responsible uses of weapons for defense, hunting to provide food, and sports. Its not just about violence, or playing cops & robbers. Water, essential for life, is inherently dangerous. A child can ...


13

Most important then if you should let your child play with toy A or toy B, is what you already posted in your question: What are the effects this kind of play have in the children's psichology? Remember toddlers and young children have trouble separating fantasy from reality. His nightmares and fantasies will seem as real as school to them. You have to ...


-4

Children learn to read by writing. Stop trying to teach her to read and instead teach her to write. Maria Montessori, "The Secret of Childhood" (1963): “This was the greatest event to take place in the first Children’s Home. The child who first made the discovery was so astonished that he shouted out loud: ’I’ve written, I’ve written!’ ... It was ...


0

I think it's safe to say that ALL kids enjoy swinging and rocking. Certainly it's a time tested way to help infants get calmed down and get to sleep. In fact it's a recommended technique by The Happiest Baby on the Block Book (which my the way has an extensive discussion on colicky babies - highly recommend this book for you). The author says that ...



Top 50 recent answers are included