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1

Is this common for his age? Yes. What can I do besides giving him more practice? You can help him strengthen this type of thinking through story telling, theater games (acting out well-known stories), manipulatives, and board games. You can tell him the story of an exciting adventure you had together. Another day you can review it by getting him ...


2

It is a good thing that your daughter thinks so highly of you -- use it as an opportunity to be a role model and exemplify the value of asking others for help. "I know how to do this because I asked _____ how to do it", "I did not do this completely on my own -- _____ did some of the work", etc. And then "You too can do just about anything if you ask the ...


5

Don't we all sometimes struggle with this? Probably less with numbers, but certainly sometimes with the alphabet. The reason behind this is how our brain "files" data. Let's take the alphabet, for example: Haven't we all learned the Alphabet Song? Sure, that means we know all the letters but we teach and learn them as a sequence, not as individual items. ...


4

Just be yourself. Right now you can do everything at a level that she can`t, you set her rules and boundaries, so of course you're a superhero. As her abilities grow, and her cognition grows, and her sphere of what she compares you to grows - she'll eventually figure out what things you suck at, maybe sometimes even better than you do. Things her friend's ...


5

I doubt a child at this age is even capable of understanding that parents are fallible. It took me until my teens to realise my parents couldn't do everything. However, that's probably in part because they look up to you because they need to learn from you. But rather than trying to teach them at this age that you can't do everything, you can also use their ...


2

It's a good opportunity to drill into her that "all people have their own strengths and weaknesses". If/when you hire people to do services, or take the car to the shop, or go to the vet's or doctor's take the opportunity to explain what those people do, and that they're better than you at those particular things. "And you will have strengths too, but ...


2

I'll share two related experiences. I was brought up by tiger parents, or chronically disapproving parents in a different cultural framework. In some respects it was torture but no pain, no gain. If this hadn't happened I may have grown up a more 'normal' person and I may have been happier but I probably would have been less successful. Is the added success ...


2

I'm a "tiger parent" to one of my daughters, but not to the other one. Here's my take. My oldest daughter does multiplication and division since age 3, she's now eight and does simple calculus. She loves science, especially physics, and since she knew that science would tell her how fast she must ride her bicycle before jumping the curve in order to have ...


8

So how should I communicate with those [who push their children to their limits]? You talk to them the way you would talk to any other parent. Respect their decisions and parenting style, try to learn from them, and share your concerns about their children with them. Try to avoid placing blame on the parents or their parenting style, that will often ...


9

I tried talking to them but most of them are not open-minded You're being equally, if not more, closed minded. You have your method of parenting and see it as better as theirs. It's not your place to tell other how to raise their children. Let them be. They don't walk up to you telling you to place your child in large numbers of extracurriculars, do ...


16

Assuming your opinion is the only right one is not really a sign of open-mindedness. There's no way you can say with certainty what way is better and, most likely, the best way actually lies somewhere in between - leaving some freedom and forcing some extracurriculars. Your children do go to school, don't they? They would have even more childhood if they ...


53

To rephrase the question you're saying you have a conflicting view with other parents on how their children should be raised and feel it's your place to pass judgement upon them or to change their ways somehow. It is not your place to do either, don't even try. Talk to them about how happy your child is, ask them about decisions they've made and look for ...


0

I know I sometimes feel a minor sense of betrayal when enough information is given about a character to provide future potential -- just to have them killed off shortly after. You invest in the character and feel the loss. Anyhow, this is going to sound off the wall but I will suggest it anyway. Have you considered video games? Most modern games involve ...


0

If you have a child who gets too painfully deep into a story, try to supply her with tools to get out of the story, so it doesn't feel like it's really happening to her. Balanced mama suggested allowing her to make up alternate endings, and Chelonian suggested telling her the characters go somewhere else afterwards, where they are happy. What I've done ...


3

The best schooling for a two year old consists of reading to him and playing with him, and taking him frequently outside to parks and play groups where he can socialize with other kids his age. At two, some of the books he might be interested in that would also be very intellectually stimulating include photo books which consist of nothing but photos of ...



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