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Of my three children, each started walking at a different age. The youngest did not walk on his own until nearly 14 months -- he was very cautious about his balance, and apparently did not want to risk falling over. The middle one started walking around 12 months, and the oldest was walking at 13 months. Children meet their developmental milestones at ...


1

My daughter didn't start crawling until her 1st birthday. She was walking when she was 18 months, and now at 2 she runs and climbs all over. She was also an early imitator/talker and says sentences now. I think she didn't crawl until she was 1 because she was an only child and we gave her anything. She needed motivation to make the effort.


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I've never really thought of it as a "stage" before but our kids had enough of a sense of what they were not suppose to be doing to get quiet when doing it around age 2-3. It's essentially at the point when they know a little about right from wrong, and they want to do what they know is wrong (such as playing with their older siblings' toys).


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Imaginative play is both normal and healthy for children (read "The Need for Pretend Play in Child Development", posted on Psychology Today, as just one of many sources that support this theory). Young children regularly cuddle, talk to, and animate their toys. A handful of anecdotes: My son will sometimes have his favorite stuffed cat tell me that there ...


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I see no reason why it would harm your child. Babies and children live in a world where fantasy plays a role: Santa, Easter Bunny, Disney's talking animals, invisible friends... Having some kind of fantasy yourself is probably less traumatizing than a parent being always serious and excluding any kind of fantasy. From where I see it, fantasy plays a role in ...


-1

First, the formula has the same amount of calories than the breast milk, and the composition in proteins, fat and amino acids its practically the same. The formula it's more difficult to digest than the breast milk. Your baby it is very young, I recommend you to breastfeed him/her when he/she wants to, not in a schedule, that helps a lot. And if you want ...


-3

I also sympathise with your wife's situation. My answer will be based on my personal experience with my two girls, but also on discussions in help groups and research on the matter. My first daughter would also not meet her wight growth milestones. She was always feeding and still not getting much weight, but met her other milestones a lot sooner. I ...


3

If you need a second opinion, please get one from another doctor (preferably as soon as possible so that your baby can get the necessary nutrition without delay.) However, since you asked: Yes, you should supplement his feeding with bottles. There's no shame whatsoever in doing this for any reason, let alone to help your baby grow. To continue exclusively ...


3

Simple answer, no there isn't a better or worse time in general. Each child is different and is going to need different amounts of time. But if you think about it, a great many children don't see one of their parents during the week very much. I work a typical office job (8-5) but if there's a late night, which happens in the professional world, I don't get ...


11

Based on my experience as a military kid, my husband's experience as a military dad, and my experience as a foster parent, the biggest factor is how the limited schedule is presented to the kids. For smaller children, like your daughter, they tend to quickly adapt to the new normal, as long as the parents are satisfied with the way things are, and are ...


0

Well, I can talk to you from my experience with my oldest child. I got pregnant at the university, and her father was 400 km away because he was at university too. Her first three year she only saw him like two times a month, two days each. She is now almost 6 years old, and love him so much. But the relationship with me it's better, because we spend a lot ...


0

I'm a kid from parents living abroad. Anecdotally, I myself forgot my parents language. My nephew moved to another country 10 years ago at age of 8 and now cannot speak his native language. Your daughter will speak French PERIOD, since it's what she will listen at daycare, school and friends. Letting her be exposed to other languages at early age is not ...


4

21 months is pretty spot on, or even a bit earlier than a lot of the kids I've seen. You don't mention how consistent she is about it (gets them in the correct order every time, doesn't skip numbers), but if she is not only able to count to 10 but not mix them up or skip some, then I think that is great! Here is a nice article detailing how a child moves ...


1

Not getting enough sleep can lead to sleep being more restless, and waking up. If he isn't getting a nap, try getting him to take one, or move bedtime earlier. Make sure his room is conducive to sleep. A comfort item, a nightlight, a few toys but nothing too stimulating. I know this can be harder for parents who are limited on space, but if possible, ...


2

We had a similar question a while back, where I outlined my own personal policy and my values backing that policy. When developing your own policy, you should consider your own values and the results you want to achieve. I think the key here is find a way to say yes. It isn't a choice between forbidding any relationship at all or permitting any ...


4

It doesn't sound like the kids are doing anything age-inappropriate, or inappropriate in general. If you don't feel comfortable helping them playact "real dating" (movies, dinners, etc) then don't do it. I'd also advise you not to get hung up on whatever they want to call their time together. From what you've described, it doesn't sound much different ...



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