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At my son's school they sent home daily "report cards" for those children with behavioral issues. These cards addressed five areas of the child's day: morning, first recess, lunch, evening, last recess. They gave a 1-5 numeric grade in several categories ("listened respectfully to teacher(s)", "did work as requested", "respectful toward classmates", etc). ...


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I am surprised that no one suggested you sit in on the "class" several times to observe your daughter's behavior. To communicate effectively, you need to know (and if to believe, you need to see first hand, so be it) what behaviors of concern your child's teachers are seeing, and for them to believe you, they need to know if what you say is true (if it is, ...


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It really seems like the teacher just doesn't have time to effectively cater 20-30 different discipline styles so any children that don't conform must be Autistic or ADD or some other trendy excuse for their behavior. This happens because teachers in the US (I'm assuming your in the US) are incredibly overworked and under supported. So while I'm not trying ...


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Small children have very little control over their lives. Most decisions are made for them. So when they figure out how to get any control, they take the idea and run with it. Your daughter has tried temper tantrums to get what she wants. And she learned that for you and your husband it doesn't work. So she doesn't try that with you. For the preschool ...


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I have always just waited til they are 3 yrs old. I have 4 kids, & that seems to work MUCH better than trying to train a 2-yr old. Cognitively, I just think they're better equipped. And mine are extremely smart (so it's not that they can't), their brains are just more well-developed by then. They understand more not only about their bodies (& its ...



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