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10

As an adult who rarely wear socks without shoes I'd say either leave him and at three he'll let you know if it bothers him even if it's indirectly. So long as his body temperature is fine then there's unlikely to be any cause for concern.


10

The boy is clearly trying to figure out adult relationships, and maybe even adult boy-girl relationships. With the dad standing right there, I would smile at the boy and say, “That’s not something your dad and I feel comfortable doing.” If he asks why, or says, “But Daddy kisses Mommy" or "You kiss me,” I would explain that (in our culture) hugs and ...


8

Crying at drop-off and pick-up is more of a separation anxiety issue, and it's totally normal. It has nothing to do with whether she likes daycare. What you really need to know is whether she cries throughout the day, or if the crying is limited to a brief period at drop off and pick up. I used to sneak in to daycare at the end of the day and see my son ...


5

I actually believe he does exist in a way similar to that depicted in the article, "Yes Virginia, There is a Santa Claus." So, when my daughter asked about it at five I said, "what do you think" she said, "I think he is real." Two weeks ago when she asked at six and said, "I don't know Mom" I responded by telling her the story of St. Nicholas and fessing ...


5

Creating Santa is about making magic. When kids finally figure out there is no Santa, you can explain that they are right, Mum and Dad were just making magic for them, and now that they have figured it out, they get to be like the grown-ups and help make magic for younger children. While saddened by the realization that there is no Santa, they will be ...


5

The biggest difference I see between 'formal' daycare with large classes of similar age kids and informal at-home daycare is being able to behave well in large groups with relatively little attention paid per child. I'm going to see this first hand to some extent; my first child is getting close to 3, and is leaving daycare to stay at home with mom (but ...


5

There is no requirement to send your child to pre-school, that's a choice that's left up to you. Obviously, there are pros and cons for whether or not you send them, which can be discussed elsewhere. As for picking schools... you supply a list of three preferences to your local authority the year before your child is due to start school. Then, based on a ...


4

That's a big question with a lot of opinions . . . the current push for "High Quality Preschool" vs. homeschooling and everything in between. My wife and I both have multiple degrees in different fields, but we didn't feel qualified to teach our kids everything they need to know. I feel the same about anyone who home schools. I wouldn't push that decision ...


4

As always there's a few layers to go through to understand what your boy is dealing with. All of these are mechanisms for defying you, which is normal and will inevitably happen. Is this in response to not getting his 3rd cookie? (I exaggerate; children will judge their parents as being unfair no matter what, they just don't understand what is at stake). ...


3

The transition will probably be harder for you than it will be for him. Joe's answer above was spot-on in getting him comfortable with being able to behave with limited supervision would be a good starting point. Enrolling him in a sport (gymnastics is pretty good depending on how full his class is, tee ball, soccer) that requires short periods of waiting ...


3

I can tell you what the daycare my children goes to does: Babies up to 12 months are in the same room. They have 2 teachers, and usually one is playing with the kids that are awake, and one is putting down or feeding someone. The awake kids are engaged in play so they don't cry, or being picked up. Since you are only one person, you need to teach the 10 ...


3

Traditionally you avoid "rewarding" children for trying new foods. Thus, you don't say "have three spoons of broccoli and then you can have pudding" because that creates bad incentives and teaches the child that the food is yucky. But there's an interesting new approach where you ask the child to try a tiny bit, and reward them with a sticker. Soon, ...


3

We had this problem mostly with meats but also for other foods as well. We found the following works well (suggested by occupational therapist): First stage: Kiss the new food. That's all... no pressure to even put in mouth. Do it for a few meals. Second stage: "Rocket it" - put in mouth and immediately spit out into napkin or trashcan. Make it fun- ...


3

In between colds, you might be able to use this method to teach your kids to blow effectively and reduce the amount of wiping & chafing overall. http://melissawiley.com/blog/2007/06/05/how-to-teach-a-toddler-to-blow-her-nose/ Finally, a children's reference librarian can recommend more books like the one I linked below, to help kids learn about nose ...


3

Try the product Boogie Wipes. These wipes have a saline solution so they break up snot and make it easier to wipe. They also have moisturizers to help prevent chaffing and chaping. Alternatively you could make your own using this tutorial. You can gently heat a wipe in the microwave so it is like a warm towel (make sure to test the temperature first). The ...


3

We put our first in at 8 weeks and our second in at 6 weeks (in a preschool-quality daycare). For our first, I think he would've been better off at home - and 2 years later, he's going to get that (my wife is staying at home with them now). He'll go to part-day preschool in a year or two, but mostly will be with mommy. He's very independent, and even in a ...


2

I'm guessing your son will do very well right off the bat. I'll start this by saying a lot of times - especially with the outgoing personalities, the parents are way more freaked about changes like this than the kids are. If you don't treat like a big deal (but also don't surprise him with it - go ahead and talk to him about it) he probably won't think it ...


2

For us, we explain that Santa is all of us. That Santa is in fact still real, but not as a tangible human, more as an emotion or a motivation in us all. So parents fill the stockings - but not exclusively, since I fill my mother's stocking and she adds things to the ones I helped to fill. And we send "stocking extras" in parcels to be added to stockings when ...


2

Get him involved in the prep of food. Even if it's something as simple as tearing a lettuce apart into shreds with their hands. Maybe try growing some herbs in a pot, and strawberries. Make some healthy pizza's and show them that yucky foods and yummy foods together don't taste bad. Like chicken wrapped in lettuce with a cheese, and broccoli sauce in the ...


2

The lovey is a beautiful thing...but its loss is a necessary evil. Obviously this post is IMHO- so here goes my comment I am 32. My DH is 36. My husband is 'Linus' from Peanuts. While many younger readers won't understand that reference I mean to say that my husband is smart and tall and handsome and well adjusted...except for his 'blankie'. He gets weird ...


2

First of all, I wouldn't worry too much. Learning languages takes some time. It is often said that speech in bilingual kids can be delayed. Even if he is already fluent in his first and even his second language, he might just need some time to process a third one. It's a good sign that he understands German; give him some time, and the rest will follow. I ...


1

My guess is that your child will do fine. It takes effort to lean to speak, and up to now, understanding German has been enough. Daycare for the first three years does not exactly make a lot of linguistic demands on a child. I had a son who largely refused to speak his (only, native) language until well after the age his older brothers had. There was ...


1

In my observation, separation anxiety is age dependent. At six months of age, babies tend to be relatively happy being left with a babysitter. At nine months, they have definitely formed attachments and will protest strongly when dropped off. Unfortunately, there is not much to be done about crying at drop-off time, other than to say a few reassuring words ...



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