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10

It is very likely that daycare will allow you to bring refrigerated or frozen breast milk and that your partner will be able to pump at work, but it takes dedication and logistics. I will share my experience, as it worked for us and was improved over months of trial/error. I went back to work when my baby was 3 months old. Each day, (after nursing my ...


8

You will probably be able to provide your own milk. Talk to daycare facilities you're considering and find out their policy. Some include formula and diapers as part of their services, some do not. Ours required parents to bring in the baby's food (whether breastmilk or formula) and stored it in the fridge with the bottle clearly labeled. Even in cases ...


4

This is the 2010 paper discussed in the CNN article: Côté SM, Petitclerc A, Raynault M, et al. Short- and Long-term Risk of Infections as a Function of Group Child Care Attendance: An 8-Year Population-Based Study. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(12):1132-1137. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.216. Children contract infections around the time they ...


4

A totally different (and probably complementing) aproach from Ossum's Mom's brilliant answer (+1) would be to make sure that these children feel that they are important to you. That they matter to you as opposed to you being just "that funny person that stops by". That is, talk to them, listen actively and remember what they tell you. At the next visit, show ...


4

For each family, find things you do well or enjoy that the parent(s) do not, and find a fun way to bring the children into your world -- assuming they're old enough for that activity. Do you like fly fishing, but this couple does not? Take the kid(s) fly fishing. Do you like art museums but this family never seems to go to one? Take them to an art ...


3

I can tell you what the daycare my children goes to does: Babies up to 12 months are in the same room. They have 2 teachers, and usually one is playing with the kids that are awake, and one is putting down or feeding someone. The awake kids are engaged in play so they don't cry, or being picked up. Since you are only one person, you need to teach the 10 ...


3

First of all, I wouldn't worry too much. Learning languages takes some time. It is often said that speech in bilingual kids can be delayed. Even if he is already fluent in his first and even his second language, he might just need some time to process a third one. It's a good sign that he understands German; give him some time, and the rest will follow. I ...


3

I have an inhome daycare and am battling this same issue with one of my little guys. I have five children of my own and know very well about potty training issues. My oldest children are in college. I understand that we aren't supposed to be negative about accidents. Accidents is the key word here. Your son and my little guy aren't having accidents. I ...


2

There are a few things at work here, that seem to be combined in your question. The first is the concept that your child should be exposed to diseases at a younger age in order to avoid sickness at an older age. Much of your immune system works such that once you are exposed to a particular antigen (such as a protein from a virus or a bacteria), you ...


2

The childcare has a responsibility to treat your child appropriately and according to your wishes. That said, there may be practical reasons why they need to put him in nappies (hygiene and having to wash the carpets). I've had exactly the same experience with my daughter. Every 30 minutes seems far too often, and could easily be off-putting to a small ...


2

Seeing your kids after work is always awesome. Leaving them to go to work can in some ways be like the only break you get in a day. So I would have to say it depends on the kind of person you are. If you just love every second with your kids and have the patience of a saint, then stay at home is probably the way to go. If you're like me and have a low ...


2

I will be honest, I have no choice but to work as I was a divorced mom and had a family of four to feed and clothe, and rent to pay to keep a roof over our heads. The children understood, as they knew I was looking out for them, and are now following my example and all work. In between my days off I would take them for picnics and to Stourport and Kinver, ...


2

For sleep times you can use a mosquito bed net https://www.google.com.br/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=mosquito%20net%20for%20bed To indoor day-to-day use a repellent applyed directly to the skin or a some kind of mosquito indoors repellent ...


1

Mosquito netting is one option (set up a tent over them), but it restricts the child to a fairly confined area. This can work fine for a newborn who doesn't move, but a toddler who wants to run and play, not so much. For mobile children, some sort of mosquito repellent on their body is a better choice. Typically this is a liquid spray in a can; the smell is ...


1

Burts bees makes a herbal insect repellent. This would be good for really little babies. http://www.burtsbees.com/Herbal-Insect-Repellent/15299-00,default,pd.html Also Avon makes a product called Skin So Soft that smells nice and it also repels bugs. https://www.avon.com/category/bath-body/skin-so-soft/bug-guard?setlang=en These products seem to be a ...


1

The question seems to assume that the impact is negative, but research is showing the exact opposite. This study came out just last month showing that a working mother is correlated with positive outcomes for her children across cultures. Adult daughters of working mothers are more likely to be employed, earn higher wages, and hold supervisory positions. ...


1

It's not unusual behaviour for younger children. My 3 year old sometimes cries when she's dropped off at play-school, but is generally fine a while afterwards. Children often cry when the parent leaves, but usually get over it pretty quickly. I would suggest leaving, then watching through a crack in the door for 5 minutes or so to see how they get on.


1

Most likely they just need time. My daughter was very much like that at age four, to the point where she wouldn't speak a single word to anyone the entire time. She is now five and a half, and you would never be able to tell she used to be that way. Some kids just take a little longer than others, especially when they spend most of their time with their ...


1

My guess is that your child will do fine. It takes effort to lean to speak, and up to now, understanding German has been enough. Daycare for the first three years does not exactly make a lot of linguistic demands on a child. I had a son who largely refused to speak his (only, native) language until well after the age his older brothers had. There was ...



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