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20

This sounds totally inappropriate and a major warning flag. Both my children have been through numerous childcare centres/kindergartens/ELCs and none of them even had a television. The American Academy of Pediatrics have "that parents should limit the amount of time their infants and toddlers spend in front of any sort of screen and reaffirmed earlier ...


15

If it's a full-time nanny I'm assuming it's inside your own home. You have to understand your home also belongs to your child and although in the real world we have to deal with all sorts of people we don't like to be around people we don't like in our own home. This can be a significant cause of stress and a reason that your child is reacting so ...


15

Offer him a "routine" to give him a sense of control and time to transition. A repeatable routine would give him a chance to smoothly "wrap up" what he is doing mentally and help him switch contexts. Try something along the lines of, "Hi (term of endearment and name) I'm here, you have about 10 minutes to get ready to go. Can you show me what you are ...


14

We're still relatively new to the situation (7 months in; 3 if you discount the leave my wife and I took from work after our son was born), but we've definitely noticed some pros and cons, particularly in the daycare vs. nanny/SAH parent. Pro Socialization. We've definitely seen some real boost in developmental growth in certain areas due to the time our ...


14

From all the classes I have taken (I have a Bachelor’s degree in Human Development and Family Studies), we learned that the primary factors influencing child outcomes when both parents work is the happiness of the parents with their roles. Looking back through one of my textbooks (Child, Family, School, Community: Socialization and Support 7th ed. by Roberta ...


13

I think its also proper to set expectations, many 2 year olds while they "play" tend to do so in parallel not with a lot of interaction. So you may want to be careful in what you expect, so you don't see something that is not there. Significant change is also something to aware of, as Torben notes, and will definitely influence young children who have ...


12

You are asking very difficult question. I grew up with a working mom in a former Soviet Union, and most of my classmates had working moms. I don't think it had any negative impact. On the positive side, I was pretty independent from around 9 years old - I took public transportation and went to activities myself. Luckily she was pretty flexible when it ...


12

You can't .. don't bother trying. I certainly would not delay bringing up concerns in order to spare the feelings of the staff. Who cares if they like you, and if they are nasty to your child you need a new provider anyway. My advice ... 1/ Be courteous and respectful. In fact be overly so. 2/ Focus on the future, not the past. Don't say "I was ...


12

As a child care provider I found this to be quite common in both the two's classroom and the threes classroom so the information that it "usually ends around two" is not accurate in the reality of my experience. What I would suggest is two fold: Your child does need reassurances from you in your words and behavior. Are you having a hard time with the ...


12

For a professional, dedicated daycare, it is absolutely inappropriate. For in-home daycares, though, it may be difficult to avoid. As Dave mentioned in his answer, the clear recommendation is that there should be no television exposure before the age of two, and after that the amount of television exposure, if any, should be heavily restricted. ...


11

Some of the main proponents of attachment theory, which is a theory of how children develop a relationship with their primary caregiver and how that impacts their relationships throughout the rest of their life, are generally opposed to daycare, as described in this article. If you look into attachment theory and daycare you will find more information from ...


10

You should visit the day care. If you show up unannounced, you can see them 'in action'. Below are some general guidelines and a few references. facilities does it look safe and clean? what toys are available? schedule what activities are included? are there opportunities for both individual and group play? do they have snack time? What do they ...


10

We had to send my son to daycare by the time he was 3 months old. My wife got 4 weeks of maternity leave, and then used 4 weeks of vacation to extend it to two months. I had saved up 4 weeks of vacation/personal time as well, so I took over staying home once my wife had to go back to work. At 3 months, we started taking our son to a friend who was ...


10

As an adult who rarely wear socks without shoes I'd say either leave him and at three he'll let you know if it bothers him even if it's indirectly. So long as his body temperature is fine then there's unlikely to be any cause for concern.


10

The boy is clearly trying to figure out adult relationships, and maybe even adult boy-girl relationships. With the dad standing right there, I would smile at the boy and say, “That’s not something your dad and I feel comfortable doing.” If he asks why, or says, “But Daddy kisses Mommy" or "You kiss me,” I would explain that (in our culture) hugs and ...


9

I can imagine that he's feeling uneasy at being moved from his grandma and dropped into full-time daycare that abruptly. Usually, you'd start daycare just a few hours a day and gradually increase to full time. I understand that with evebody working full-time as well, it's hard or impossible to provide a transition phase. I think two weeks is not enough ...


9

first of all, I want to say that I have tremendous respect for what you are doing. My wife is experiencing the same thing, so I know how it is. The way I see this, is that your little one is passionate and curious. But he does not understand the world he lives in. My daughter also bites, scratches, and hits. When it comes to discipline, there is not much we ...


8

The distinction here, as you've noticed, is between setting goals and applying pressure. The difference is whether the focus is on the behaviour of your child or of the centre towards your child. From the centre's perspective, I suspect they're simply trying to figure out what you, their clients, want from them. For example, I would like my daughter to be ...


8

Crying at drop-off and pick-up is more of a separation anxiety issue, and it's totally normal. It has nothing to do with whether she likes daycare. What you really need to know is whether she cries throughout the day, or if the crying is limited to a brief period at drop off and pick up. I used to sneak in to daycare at the end of the day and see my son ...


7

It sounds like you and your wife may have slightly different inclinations about whether a change is needed, so I'll see if I can make a respectable argument for the 'contrarian' side: If the situation doesn't improve in a reasonable amount of time then it would seem changes are needed. Does the nanny acknowledge the problem? Does she know that the kids ...


7

Basically, if the child still needs it, it is too soon to give it up. There is no medical or psychological evidence that there is an age too old for comfort objects, eg Lovey's. Many children keep them until they make friends at school. Comfort objects are very important for children. Teaching children to cope with stress will help with transitions. Even ...


7

Ok, so this might be a stupid answer, but I had a similar situation occur with me when I was maybe 3 or 4. My mom arrived to pick me up from daycare, and I didn't want to go. I insisted that I wanted to stay and play more with my friends. So my mom said, "Ok, I'll be back to pick you up a little later, then." At first, I was all cool with this. Then I ...


7

That depends a lot on the daycare and the age of the other kids. Where I live (The Netherlands), maternity leave ends when the baby is 12 weeks old, and then they go to daycare, usually just 2-3 days a week at first. This means that the staff is experienced with babies of this age, and they are well cared for. There is also a rule that in the groups of tiny ...


7

I think before anything is done, you have to talk to the teacher to learn more. You need to verify that what your child is telling you is accurate. If it is, I would recommend going to the owner/operator of the daycare and asking them what their action plan is for this. At my child's daycare, there are two separate classes for each age/grade level. Perhaps ...


6

In the UK there is a regulatory body called OFSTED that makes random inspections. The reports from those inspections are available to the public. They give a rough guide to how good the facility is, but you have to be aware that they are a snapshot from a single day. If a bad centre is having a good day (or a good centre is having a bad day) the report ...


6

Children who are routinely challenged develop more quickly in the areas where they are challenged. A day care may or may not challenge your child. They vary incredibly in both programming and quality. If you are concerned about your child's motor skills, get them used! Throw a ball, play hopscotch, play an instrument, study martial arts, dance, whatever ...


5

I'd suggest you spend some time and see how they interact. Your 4yo may have a point. We had a number of nannies for our son over an 18 month period. Some were great and really loved kids and totally got that the job is all about being there 100% for the child and being involved with them. Others, not so much. One would arrive at our house, turn on the TV ...


5

As a teacher and a recently back to work mom, I think there are more cons than pros. I know that many feel that there are many pros, but my experience is that by and large, your child will care more about time with you rather than money and things from you. I know when I think about my childhood I think about the time my mother took with each of us every day ...


5

Moving to a new house and changing the daycare are big changes, a new bed is a small change. Potty training can be either, as is so often the case, it depends... I see three separate issues here: Can you separate the daycare switch from the moving? If you can, you definitely should consider making them two distinct events, IMO Moving means a new room and ...



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