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2

I agree with the previous answers in that you may not k ow the whole story (based on your short question), but I disagree that it's ever ok to tell a child they have no reason to cry. A child doesn't understand the difference between "this doesn't warrant such an emotional response" and "you're not allowed to cry over this". I always cringe when I hear ...


-1

It's a two-year-old question, but a couple of thoughts: I don't see anything categorically wrong with a parent crying in front of a child ... but I think you need to be careful that you do not burden a child with adult concerns. If grandpa just died, I think it's quite appropriate for parent and child to cry together. We can't hide the fact that grandpa ...


4

I certainly agree that it is wrong to tell a child (or an adult, for that matter) that the only legitimate reason to cry is if they have suffered physical injury. On the other hand, your brief account above doesn't necessarily tell the whole story. I don't know if you know the whole story. Did you just overhear a snippet of a conversation in passing? Or ...


9

There's a difference between an emotion and its expression. Crying in children is a social signal, "I need someone urgently to fix my problem." Parents who tell their children not to cry about something aren't telling them it's not okay to feel that emotion, they are telling them, "This is not something that requires the urgent degree of other people's ...


1

I have a 7 month old baby girl and the thing that helped the most for us, besides having someone sit in the back with her, is to have one of those mirrors mounted on the headrest of the back seat so I can see her face in my rear view mirror. This eases my anxiety about driving with her and I'm not sure if it will help you but I did not see it mentioned here ...


3

Studies show that newborns are discriminating. They can tell the difference between the sounds of • their own cries • the cries of other newborns, and • the cries of older babies And newborns are more likely to cry only if they hear the cries of other newborns. Source here (See the section titled "Newborn babies show empathy...and ...


2

the last time this happened to me i called my mother on the phone. just having her presence helped the soul-wrenching that his crying causes me and i was able to focus on the road and tune him out. i couldn't hear her very well over speakerphone with him screaming, but just knowing she was there, singing old macdonald with me to try to calm him, left a ...


5

If I can summarize first, it seems the real question is this: The primary issue I have while driving with him like that is that I end up distracted... Half the time there's only one driver, so the other one of us can't distract/soothe him. The difficulty seems to be fully focus on driving, despite your crying infant. As I've driven van-fulls of ...


3

No one has said this exactly, so I'll throw this out in hopes of it helping. We are, as parents, hard-wired neurologically to respond to our infant's cry with a fight-or-flight response; there is nothing you can do about that except to read about it and accept that this isn't a true emotion per se but a neurological response that evolved to assure parental ...


3

I agree with @Lance's answer that it's very possible that you might be taking this more seriously than you need to. That was my first impression. I'm not sure that I would consider his behavior as solely manipulation to get his way. It might be that when he's sad, he really just does miss the comfort of the mother he was born to and continues to see every ...


1

I have been in the situation in a couple different ways, and it is surely two things: We always read too much into things, but it is always important to continue to be that parent because the alternative has lasting negative effects. The "i want to go to the other parents" is a very intelligent way of manipulation, to suggest that he knows everyone is ...


1

We've had the same issue with our son once we changed his car seat to a forward-facing one, where his older sister is fine for exactly 8.75 hours before she needs a break in the car! What we think it was, was simply the car seat bottom and angle. It would likely just cause a sore butt and/or lower back. Once we placed a new car-seat, the child is fine(r). ...


1

I have a boy who is similar, he's four. I've learned to modify my language so I don't even say no just in case it has such a strong and lengthy reaction from him that it disrupts everything. He does it when he is overly tired, ill, run down, hungry (the mornings can be terrible) or constipated (which he can be a bit prone to be and sneaks up on us). It can ...



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