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2

If I can summarize first, it seems the real question is this: The primary issue I have while driving with him like that is that I end up distracted... Half the time there's only one driver, so the other one of us can't distract/soothe him. The difficulty seems to be fully focus on driving, despite your crying infant. As I've driven van-fulls of ...


1

No one has said this exactly, so I'll throw this out in hopes of it helping. We are, as parents, hard-wired neurologically to respond to our infant's cry with a fight-or-flight response; there is nothing you can do about that except to read about it and accept that this isn't a true emotion per se but a neurological response that evolved to assure parental ...


3

I agree with @Lance's answer that it's very possible that you might be taking this more seriously than you need to. That was my first impression. I'm not sure that I would consider his behavior as solely manipulation to get his way. It might be that when he's sad, he really just does miss the comfort of the mother he was born to and continues to see every ...


1

I have been in the situation in a couple different ways, and it is surely two things: We always read too much into things, but it is always important to continue to be that parent because the alternative has lasting negative effects. The "i want to go to the other parents" is a very intelligent way of manipulation, to suggest that he knows everyone is ...


1

We've had the same issue with our son once we changed his car seat to a forward-facing one, where his older sister is fine for exactly 8.75 hours before she needs a break in the car! What we think it was, was simply the car seat bottom and angle. It would likely just cause a sore butt and/or lower back. Once we placed a new car-seat, the child is fine(r). ...


0

Try to think of those instances as situations in which you are practicing driving. Think of the screaming as a challenge--like added weight when you are running or swimming upstream for exercise. I would use the strategy that a professional athlete would use--think of a basketball player at the free throw line in an opponent's stadium, or a pitcher trying to ...


0

I have a boy who is similar, he's four. I've learned to modify my language so I don't even say no just in case it has such a strong and lengthy reaction from him that it disrupts everything. He does it when he is overly tired, ill, run down, hungry (the mornings can be terrible) or constipated (which he can be a bit prone to be and sneaks up on us). It can ...


6

Some ideas you may not have tried for the baby: Maybe he's getting too much air, or too little. Check to make sure sun isn't getting in his eyes. Try running your errands at different times of the day. Try vibrating the car seat with your hand. Try having the non-driving adult sit in the back next to him. For the distracted driving part, the best thing ...


6

We were in the same boat with our son; he would only settle down when we sped up on the highway, leading to his nickname of Ricky Bobby. We found that, weather permitting, cracking the back windows to allow a bit of white noise from the wind would help a bit. For myself, however, I had to do a LOT of self-talk to keep my mind on driving and not on his ...


2

I was visiting my daughter when my grandson was 4 or 5. She was not into discipline too much. While there, she and her husband wanted to go out for the night and my daughter's parting words were "Mom, if you can get Billy to take a bath, that'd be great." My immediate thought was, "Hmmmm I outweigh him by at least 70 lbs. I'll bet I can 'get' him to take a ...


0

I'm not a mother, but I do babysit and have been looking after kids for a long time. I know I'm just a teen but what I've found that works with most kids I watch, is that if they start crying over something just ignore them. don't give them attention for it because that's what they are trying to get. It doesn't work immediately, but I've found that for the ...


0

I'm going to echo the recommendations for forcing naps every 1.5 to 2 hours, as well as the recommendation for swaddling. My daughter will not sleep unless we actively force a nap on her. Since we increased the frequency to every 2 hours, it has helped combat her colicky cries. Also, there's a chance that he doesn't actually hate swaddling. Fighting it ...



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