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65

Babies cry. Maybe it helps to know what an infant's 'normal" crying pattern is. Fuss/cry durations peak in the first 2 months (peaking average: 6 weeks), are highest in evenings, and decrease approximately 50% by 12 weeks of age. So, the first two months are the worst. Also, not all infants are alike; some are very compliant, some are very persistent, and ...


28

You can not spoil a young baby. Being born is a very discomforting experience: the world is cold and full of harsh lights and loud noises. The only comfort you know as a baby is being fed or cuddled. Also, when babies grow older and develop, they discover new things all the time, which they do not understand and might confuse them, also leading to ...


25

Newborns cry because they need attention. Rather than learning patience, research indicates that not responding to their cry increases their cortisol levels as well as placing a child at risk for poor emotional attachment with adults. There is also the risk that your child is in pain or sick and needs your prompt attention. Here is an article that further ...


21

You need air to pass over your vocal cords for vocalizations like an infants cry to start. However, it has been observed that fetuses in the womb will make crying-like movements with their mouths, so they're certainly practicing in utero for blasting our eardrums when they arrive.


17

One of the main reasons a newborn (particularly such a new newborn!) dislikes diaper changes is the fact that they're cold. Really cold. Normally they have this nice warm layer on them that keeps them warm and cozy, and you're ripping that off of them with nary a care for their ... well, I'm sure that's what the newborn thinks, anyway. To avoid this, you ...


16

A one year child, while quite active with the hands and legs, is in the discovery phase, everything is new and exciting. Putting things in the mouth or feeling crevices through is their way of experiencing their world. At the same time, they are definitely aware of when their parents are happy with them and when they are not. They also try to take actions ...


16

There's a lot of research about fighting in front of your children, but I couldn't find anything particular to crying. I think in general expressing emotions is a good thing. I've even found it useful at times to exaggerate my emotion to kids too young to pick up on subtle facial cues. It helps teach them to act with empathy. For example, a two year-old ...


15

Newborns are really totally helpless and completely rely on their parents for all their needs. They usually only cry if they have some need to be satisfied (hunger, diaper, sleep, or even company). Don't let your newborn cry without reason. Newborns and infants cannot learn patience the way you seem to indicate, and letting them cry for too long might ...


15

First of all, to kids that age it's all "big stuff." It makes them sad to not get their way, and crying is how they express their sadness. If I suddenly discovered a way to make my children not want to cry in the first place, I don't think I would use it. That being said, at best crying forces everyone around you to give excessive attention to you and ...


14

There are a couple of issues here. Your child throwing tantrums and dealing with that has been addressed by others. Then there is the cultural issue of how the interaction between an Indian parent and child should be. I'll try to address that. I'll explain the emotions in the t-shirt issue, for example. For example, he had to wear a yellow t-shirt to ...


13

Check out this article and its sources, the combination has a lot of depth. I'll summarize some of the high points. The excessive stress from crying it out reduces long term coping skills for stress. The article I link can lead to a fear of being alone, separation anxiety, panic attacks and addictions as well as a 10 times greater chance of the child ...


13

I think that's good advice. Try to ignore light fussing. Wait and see if it develops into something more. We were told the same by the midwife, and at least for us it was good. Most of the time, our son stopped fussing again on his own. If he didn't, we'd sometimes tuck him in a little and that would be enough. Sometimes it was the beginning of some real ...


13

As a child I always found it reassuring to know my parents were mortal and capable of sadness like me. I think something that contributed to my development was when mom and dad would explain what they were crying about when they saw my concern. It also helps children recognize for themselves when something is making them sad, and that is why they are ...


13

We mostly only ask one of our children to stop crying, and that's because he will literally keep going for hours if we don't. Most children get it out of their systems in a couple minutes and move on, at least for crying about something that happened in the past and is done, not an ongoing condition like being tired or sick. At a certain point, crying ...


12

Many people get motion sick when moving backwards for any length of time. I suspect that this might be the case for your daughter because her older sister did better once she was front-facing. If this is the case, the second your daughter hits the car seat, she knows that horrible feeling is coming, but she doesn't know why or how to tell you. I would ...


11

When all else fails I try the following: Hold your baby high against your body, walk up and down a dark hallway, and sing to your little one. The walking is very soothing to them and the dark is relaxing. Additionally, a good technique is to firmly pat their diaper to the beat of whatever you're singing; don't spank them, but a good pat that helps them focus ...


11

To teach children how to call for help appropriately, the first thing I would do is share with them the story of "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" (which you have already mentioned). But you want to encourage, not discourage, your child to ask for assistance. Getting my kids ready to stay home alone has meant practicing what needs to be done in an emergency or if ...


11

Very common - it's generally called the witching hour, and each of our kids needed something different to sooth them through it. One responded well to walking up and down the street with me singing to her. I know some need to face in, others need to face out.


11

Hi I am a child developmentalist who works with children who have developmental disabilities. One of my areas is language development from birth. The answer to your question is 'yes' you can figure out what a baby needs by its cry. Crying is the first step on the child's path to spoken language. It is the primary form of communication from which all ...


11

I know parents on both extremes of the spectrum, and if there are any long-term effects on their children, I honestly can't detect them. I think if one way was clearly better the topic wouldn't be so hotly debated. In my experience, the harm is more short term due to the boy-who-cried-wolf effect. When you become accustomed to ignoring their cries, you ...


11

Some babies have their internal clock backwards when they're born. My daughter is three weeks old, and while not quite as out of rhythm as your son, she is definitely more awake and aware between the hours of 7 and midnight than during daylight, and she sleeps like a rock during the day. Some of this may be inherent in a baby's programming; Mommy's expected ...


11

Blowing on the face is a common trick. It triggers a reflex to hold the breath for a short moment. That stops the crying, and can also be used when washing the child's face etc. I am not aware of any consequences of this, neither positive nor negative.


10

Yes and no: yes an infant cries in several distinct ways to tell you what's wrong, yes the phenomenon ends after some months, no I don't think those 5 "words" (as per your Wikipedia link) are international or even noticeable. I had not heard of the Dunstan theory before, and I don't recognise the words stated on the website. But I swear that while my son ...


10

My pediatrician as well as several of my friends have recommended the book/DVD "Happiest Baby on the Block" for methods to calm a fussy baby. Dr. Harvey Karp details 5 things you can do to make your baby feel like he is in the womb, which should calm him down. It sounds like you've tried several of these, but Karp says if you try them at the same time and ...


10

First of all, the old and famous counting to 10 will probably help you control your temper. Or try saying, mommy needs a time out right now we will get back to this in a few minutes and leave the room. These are methods to both help you calm down and teach your son how to deal with upsetness. In terms of his crying, he is 8, he should know or must learn ...


9

For a healthy baby, I like to keep things simple, so Hungry Dirty Nappy/Diaper Wind Tired This allows a simple set of rules to be followed to sort the problem. My response to crying is always Does she need fed --> Yes --> Feed | | V No --> Is her nappy dirty --> Yes --> Change | | V No --> Is she showing signs of wind (knees to chest, red ...


9

At that age, it is normal to spend pretty much all her waking time trying to interact with her - remember, the more interaction she has with you, your wife and others now, the faster her brain will develop, and the easier it is for her to learn social skills. That said, be sensible about it - you don't both need to be with her, so take turns - each of you ...


9

I just want to share a slightly different perspective on this one. I totally agree with Karl that its "all big stuff" and that handling things "the nice way" is usually going to work best for you. However, I want to offer a perspective I don't already see here: For any social human (which is really all of us) a big part of our psychological validation ...


9

First, you are not withholding comfort. You are allowing them to express themselves in a way which requires them to handle the issue without forming a dependency. Being comforting is not the same thing for every child and every situation. For relatives, they likely have children. That being the case, I'd ask them if any 2 of the children were able to be ...


8

I always responded to his whining and grunting, but now I wish I had not. I now know that children need to learn to self-regulate or calm themselves independent of adult intervention. Learning this skill early is important for later emotional development and even supports problem solving. My son struggled with self-regulation early on and I think I could ...



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