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16

My Indian parents had my sister and myself in a makeshift hammock-like swing called jhoola, that hung from the ceiling. The problem, of course, is safety. However, the benefits are that it provides a womb-like experience (very snuggly, adapts to baby's shape) and baby can be rocked in its bed. I always understood the existence of cribs as a safety reason ...


9

I would suggest you to look into baby sleeping bags. I think we have one of those. We really think they are great. I think they are safe too. We have few for both colder and warmer nights. Hope that helps.


9

This is the first I've heard of the mattress-on-the-floor method, but I have to say, my first reaction is: there is no such thing as a safe room. Once mobile, a baby is able to get herself into dangerous situations using almost nothing. Crawl under the mattress, anyone? Or better yet, crawl over to the door, so it will hit the baby when the parents try to ...


9

The potential problem with putting him in the crib after he falls asleep is that he will wake up in a different place. I suspect that this is disorienting, and possibly causes him to become upset. I would stick with putting him in the crib awake, and perhaps consider trying a variation of the Ferber method, similar to what @morah suggested. Another ...


8

In my opinion, "sealing the bedding with a strong polythene sheet" presents a significant risk of suffocation -- not SIDS, just plain asphyxiation. Most infant mattresses are deliberately covered with a mesh webbing underneath the cotton surface with the explicit purpose of allowing the baby to breathe even if it turns face-down during sleep. Try it for ...


8

We have allowed our boys to use afghans at night since about 9 months old. They have holes that they can breathe through if they get them over their faces but still provide the warmth that they need. You can find some cute ones on Etsy (crochet/afghan/baby) that should work fine. In fact I was just looking and found one called green shells that is $20 and ...


6

The American Academy of Pediatrics has specific recommendations for infant bedding, with the goal of reducing instances of SIDS (a.k.a. "crib death" or "cot death"): Always place your baby on his or her back for every sleep time. Always use a firm sleep surface. Car seats and other sitting devices are not recommended for routine sleep. Keep soft objects or ...


6

The main alternative is co-sleeping, which, I believe, much of the planet's population still does. We did that mainly because it was just way more convenient for Mom. She could just roll over to nurse. One should take some precautions, of course (make sure the baby can't roll off one side, make sure you or your spouse aren't on sleep meds or anything that ...


5

Health consideration: Some may (perhaps correctly) argue that lifting the infant from the floor gives a certain level of protection against the dust particles that naturally exist whether you have hard floors or carpeting. Point of reference: Cribs are useful in the same way that tables are -- they lift interesting things up to a height that's easy for ...


5

all the guidance we got suggests that putting plastic wrapping anywhere near a mattress is a very bad idea. Like Chrys says, you do not get 'nerve gases' from mattresses, and in fact letting air get through a mattress is a much better idea. Babies should not have a pillow, but should be laid on the mattress, with one breathable blanket under them. This ...


4

Crib usage is not universal. We're Montessori parents, most of the time, and this is our baby's room, without a crib. We've been trying it as an experiment and things are working pretty well. The mattress is very low and there's a cushioned surface below it. Even when he falls, and he did a few times, it's still fine. He doesn't even wake up after ...


4

No silver bullet, but here is what my wife and I did years ago when our daughter had a problem much like this. It took about a week, but worked. The first night, we stayed next to the crib and rubbed her back, she would cry, but as long as we were there, she would eventually calm down and fall asleep. Night two, the same thing, only start steeping away a ...


3

I did 0-3 months on the top hole, 3-6 months on the next hole and so on moving every three months until I reached the bottom. I don't think I read that in a manual anywhere. It's just a timeline I thought was reasonable so I have no idea of it's the "correct" thing to do.


3

Safety details Slats no more than 2 3/8 inches apart. Reason: prevent baby's head from slipping through or getting stuck Safe corner posts: no higher than 1/16 of an inch Reason: Avoid child's cloths getting snagged on the post and strangling the baby Make sure it's sturdy. Some cribs' quality is poor. Decent wood finish if it's wooden. Generally, it's ...


3

There have been studies done with healthy infants whose ankles were tied to a mobile with a ribbon (the earliest of these is cited below; it has been oft-repeated with additional variables). The reward of the mobile moving produced more leg-kicking. This confirms not only that infants watch mobiles, but also that they attempt to interact with mobiles and ...


3

The reflex to protect the airway is a very strong one. If I'm not mistaken, once infants are about 9 months old they have enough motor control to swat things away from their face. Aside form that, most blankets are porous enough to let air through anyway, unlike plastic bags which are considered a choking hazard.


3

I'd like to add my daughter quite liked being in the crib to sleep. I think she liked the confined space. She would even push herself into a corner making her space even smaller. I don't even know if she would have been able to sleep on the floor like you describe.


3

We purchased a small "urban" crib to use bedside, based on all the dire warnings from the parenting classes we took about SIDS and such. In practice, it has been used no more than a dozen times or so for actual sleeping, other than a short period of time just after birth when our son needed light therapy for bilirubin. There are several reasons for this. ...


3

This will take a lot of persistence and work on your part. You must be stubborn and convince your child that he is NOT going to get to sleep anywhere but the crib. Start putting the child to sleep by rocking on a chair or walking around with him. DO NOT put him to sleep in your bed. He might try to break free from your hold as he is crying - do not let go. ...


2

For babies and kids be wary of mattresses that are too soft (ex: a water bed = big no no) that could suffocate the baby. You want a mattress that is firm but also comfortable. If you know you will definitely use a play yard, buy that first. They have travel play yards (i.e. "Graco Pack and Play Travel Play Yard") catered to newborns too that allow you to ...


2

I believe what you are referring to as a "Play Yard" I call a "Pack-and-Play," if that is correct here is my answer: We use a pack and play when traveling, mainly at grandma's house, and my son does not appear to have a problem with it. But then again he will sleep almost anywhere without complaint. In a swing, on the floor, a car seat, while being held, ...


2

You can do some work during the day around helping him feel comfortable in his room and crib. There are many grounding exercises and activities that can help with this. You can also start spending more time in his room during the day and even co-sleep in his room at night instead of in yours. Once he has had some positive experiences in his room, you can ...


2

We took the side off the crib ("converting to a toddler bed"), and pushed it next to our bed. Now we get our full mattress, yet the child is just a hand away. This is a middle option between "in the bed" and "in the crib" that worked for us, and might work for you. There are also commercial versions of this available, but check the CSPC site for various ...


2

Not medical advice, but from what I've seen, there's nothing explicitly wrong with a toddler sleeping on memory foam or similar. They're past the risk of SIDS, and while some people may be better off sleeping on hard mattresses for back support, it's not true that it is strictly better - it depends on the person. The main concern I'd have with memory foam ...


1

I think even the most basic of cribs have adjustable mattress height now. Given the size constraints, you might check Ikea's cribs. Most of their cribs also have the advantage not having a specific back - that is a side that should go against a wall - making it easier to find a spot for it.


1

A crib mobile can be helpful for an infant to develop his senses. He/she can see, touch and hear it, while the motion will help with 3D recognition. It is not going to turn your toddler into the next Einstein, but it helps. You however might need to try a few of them till you find one that your child finds appealing. At that age this is basically random ...


1

We began with our baby in a crib and due to a lack of space we found it awful to have to hover over the crib while she fell asleep. We also had a terrible time trying to place her in the crib already asleep to 'finish' a nap. It was impossible - she'd wake up every time. So one evening my wife, fed up, decided to lay her on the double bed we had in the same ...



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