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8

Regardless of the surface, there will be falls and bumps as she learns to crawl (and, later, walk). Keeping her at floor level is a good plan, though. There are two things I'd suggest looking for: reasonable traction and moderate padding. The traction is more important for learning how crawling works than for potential slips causing injuries. If her legs ...


4

I know it's hard to have your daughter pitching a fit at tummy time, and all you want is to keep her happy and let her learn, but let her fuss. The frustration of tummy time actually encouraged both of mine to start crawling. Think of it this way; by having her do tummy time, even if she's not a fan, you're encouraging her to find a way to either make it ...


2

"Safe" as in not harmful? Of course. Assuming you're not hurting her, there's minimal risk of physical harm in "forced crawling" around (don't step on her). When babies do crawl, they really slam their limbs into the floor, and they very often fall down. It's good to note that your baby's kneecaps are not bone, yet. They are cartilage, so there's a much ...


2

Crawling is a motor development skill that develops naturally on each child's own developmental time table. Barring any severe physical or neurological disabilities, there is no need whatsoever to "teach" or "encourage" a child to crawl. Other than giving them ample safe space in which to explore, respect their stage of development (whatever that is), and ...


2

One of the hardest things for me to learn when my son was your daughter's age was "be less helpful." He didn't have too much need to crawl because he'd reach for things outside his grasp and we'd get them for him. That said, he simply was not much of a crawler, ever. He was pulling himself up on things and traveling before average but didn't "army crawl." ...


2

Tummy time is not explicitly 'learn to crawl' time. It is a combination of several things. Building strength and balance Increasing activity Getting the baby used to different positions Usually is more active than back-time Improve head shape (avoiding 'flat head') Certainly give her toys during this period. Don't push crawling very hard; she'll do ...


2

Carpet is good for crawling. If you don't want to lay a full carpet you could get a rug. We found a rug better than a blanket as the blanket can bunch up under the baby as she moves. A rug should be big enough for the learning stage. Once the baby gets more confident, she will be able to crawl anywhere, including the wooden floor. I wouldn't encourage her to ...


2

We didn't have any trouble with crawling on a hardwood floor, but we did provide a small rug (an Ikea-type children's playmat) for the winter months when the floor was colder. Carpet has its own downsides - it's slower, for one, which while for you might be nice, for the kid will be irritating. Hardwood has an additional advantage: it's noisy, so you know ...


1

We have a laminated wood floor (rather slippery for floor-to-cloth contact), but we had some clothes with non-slip rubbery patches on knees that were helpful. Similarly, for starting to walk, some baby tights/socks have those rubbery "dots" on their soles which prevent that slipping.


1

Forced anything is not good for your child. Or for your spouse or colleague or anyone else. If you want more specific feedback, I can give you a child physiotherapeutist's opinion: Don't do it. Let him/her do what he/she feels like doing. No forced crawling, walking or anything, that creates bad movement habbits which take real hard work to fix years ...



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