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25

TL;DR Version: Having a separate room for a child is generally a luxury that not everyone has, and the options that it opens up for those who have the opportunity to try it can be attractive. Bed sharing is generally not recommended for health/safety reasons, so room sharing while avoiding bed sharing may be problematic or completely impractical. First, ...


23

The short answer to "is there any scientific evidence in favor of co-sleeping?" appears to be "yes". TLDR version: There are studies, particularly by Professor James McKenna, that show that there are strong correlations between co-sleeping and improved breast feeding. These same studies suggest that co-sleeping mothers get at least as much sleep as mothers ...


17

First of all, if the child is sleeping with us, we can't engage in any other bed-suitable activities than sleeping. At least I think that sex is out of the question if our child sleeps with us. Secondly, it may be difficult for the child to learn to sleep without parents later on. At one time or another it will have to happen and the transition may be ...


17

A quick search will yield many articles and studies that show infants benefit from touch. With co-sleeping, infants are touched while falling asleep and often all through the night. Among other things, touch helps to increase the parent-child bond. Parents get much better sleep because they don't usually have to get up and fully wake if the baby wakes ...


11

Kids need to learn that things have edges and that you fall down when you crawl or toddle over them. We had our kids often on a futon on a carpet. Maybe an 8" fall. That was perfect for learning what happens if you go over the edge and what to do about this. As a result they were all very early "staircase" safe and knew what to do when approaching an edge. ...


10

I would add that there are significant cultural differences between the US and to some extent other western countries (particularly British-origin cultures) and eastern countries (and even some 'western' countries) that make this a very different issue for the two cultures. I'm going to use 'Americans' here as that is my experience, but I believe some of ...


10

That is a really difficult question mate. I will try to give you an answer never the less. Easy answer is that it really depends on your child. :) Yeah i guess you never thought of that, right? Generally speaking... For a kid, there is no real difference between putting him into a bed, or something else. He will never the less cry because he isn't ...


9

The potential problem with putting him in the crib after he falls asleep is that he will wake up in a different place. I suspect that this is disorienting, and possibly causes him to become upset. I would stick with putting him in the crib awake, and perhaps consider trying a variation of the Ferber method, similar to what @morah suggested. Another ...


6

I think what you're looking for is this: http://www.thisnext.com/tag/bassinets/ From what I've understood it's not on the market presently?


5

No silver bullet, but here is what my wife and I did years ago when our daughter had a problem much like this. It took about a week, but worked. The first night, we stayed next to the crib and rubbed her back, she would cry, but as long as we were there, she would eventually calm down and fall asleep. Night two, the same thing, only start steeping away a ...


5

Dariusz gave a great answer. I only want to add that in reference to smaller (< 1 years old) children, some parents are heavy sleepers, in the event that a parent rolls over on the child, and smothers that child so that they cannot breathe, and the parent sleeping too heavy to know, then tragedy can result. The child may also decide at that moment to ...


5

I don't think you need any different solution than what you already have. He rolls around, and finds the boundaries. There's no harm in that; he won't get bruises or concussions from rolling in the crib. A larger crib will only give him longer crib sides to hit his head on. You might want to shop around for some padding on the inside of the crib; make ...


5

Unfortunately, sleeping anywhere - bed, sofa, floor - with the infant nearby is not recommended. From the CDC site: Have the baby share your room, not your bed. Your baby should not sleep in an adult bed, on a couch, or on a chair alone, with you, or with anyone else. From the AAP: The AAP recommends the arrangement of room-sharing without ...


5

I don't think there is a definitive answer for this question. The behavioral and development specialists at the children's hospital where my sons PCP is all agree that co-sleeping is bad and should only be allowed as an exception to comfort a child on stormy nights or after other upsetting events. Their arguments are that it prevents children from ...


4

I will offer thoughts on my plan: Just like my daughter, I think it just takes getting used to and I just need to practice. Also I think adults could benefit from a bedtime routine as well which I don't have. I also don't have a set wake up time so I would implement that as well as being conscious of other factors: eating 3 hours before bed doing a ...


3

Our kids make it very obvious they wanted their own beds. The first at 3, then second before 18 months. They got to the point of being fidgety and grumpy when in our bed, often kicking away to get their own space, and seeming irritated to be with us. We made a point to get them beds, letting them pick bedding, and praising attention around the bed. There ...


3

We cosleep and have never rolled on the baby. We've done this since she was about 1 month old (up until then, she slept alone with her mother), and she's now 6 1/2 months old. It's really cosy, even though there are often interruptions to your sleep. The first nights were tricky, because of the fear of rolling on her, but eventually you just become aware ...


3

The Baby Book By Dr. Sears has an entire chapter addressing this very subject. He is pro-cosleeping and introduces a number of ways to "wean" from the process depending on your particular needs. His suggestion that he favors was way too old for my tastes, but since he offered mid-range suggestions as well, my husband and I found a comfortable middle ground ...


3

This will take a lot of persistence and work on your part. You must be stubborn and convince your child that he is NOT going to get to sleep anywhere but the crib. Start putting the child to sleep by rocking on a chair or walking around with him. DO NOT put him to sleep in your bed. He might try to break free from your hold as he is crying - do not let go. ...


3

It's hard to see how to do this in a gradual way. He's either sleeping in your bed or not. Not much gradual about it. Everyone agrees that consistency is the trick. As for ways of doing it, and hints of how to help, the answers to my question might be useful: How can I get my 12-month baby to sleep in her bed?


3

Firstly, there is a distinction that should be made. Co-sleeping is actually the practice of sleeping in the same room with the baby. Bed-sharing is when the baby sleeps in bed next to or between the parents. Insofar as any studies go, they can't seem to differentiate between sleep-related deaths or suffocation and SIDS/SUID. IMO, the hospital is full of ...


3

I have a few tips that worked for us to get our son to go to sleep in his crib without crying, although we haven't mastered the staying there all night part quite yet. We are not keen on the leaving to cry (Weisbluth - healthy sleep habits, happy child) or controlled crying (Ferber - solve your child's sleep problems) approach so I won't cover that here ...


3

Children like routine. A framework allows them to feels safe and then start to explore the world and their place in it. People need routine for good sleep. People who have problems with sleep need to start quite a rigid routine and stick to it. So, try that first. You and your ex should try to agree a routine that you both try to stick to. This will ...


3

This sort of thing isn't limited to separated parents. My oldest (who's 3.5) is very similar, but with "daycare" in place of the other parent. He naps consistently every day at 12:30 on the nose for 3 hours at daycare (or until recently did; I think that time is going down a bit now that he's older). Best napper they've ever seen - and has since he was a ...


3

My first thought is that maybe something is making her uncomfortable which causes her to move around more, hit and kick. Could she maybe be teething? When my son is uncomfortable with teething, the main sign seems to be restlessness at night. He'll fidget more and often wake himself up soon after falling back to sleep. Another reason could be if she feels ...


2

Here's a link to a UK charity NCT (National Childbirth Trust) online shop which sells a few products like you describe. http://www.nctshop.co.uk/Sleeping/products/27/?gclid=CLa63fyD9qoCFYELfAodekOwLQ Here's an Amazon.co.uk link for a product which is not a full size cot: ...


2

Our younger daughter was never very good at sleeping in her crib (for naps during the day) so we just gave up and had her sleep in the bed for naps too. I don't remember when it was, but she was pretty small. Anyway, if the bed is big enough that you're reasonably safe that she won't roll out then that might be an idea. It should be much easier to get her ...


2

You'll need to put up some sort of child barrier, definitely. Once children start getting mobile in bed you've got to make sure they're contained as they move in their sleep and could easily wriggle their way off the end, sides, or anywhere they can possibly get to.


2

We took the side off the crib ("converting to a toddler bed"), and pushed it next to our bed. Now we get our full mattress, yet the child is just a hand away. This is a middle option between "in the bed" and "in the crib" that worked for us, and might work for you. There are also commercial versions of this available, but check the CSPC site for various ...


2

I notice that many people have stated that not having to wake completely to nurse is a major benefit. I am a bit baffled by this being such a strong argument for co-sleeping for a number of reasons: Nursing a newborn was not that easy for me, perhaps because I am very large chested and there was a constant danger of suffocating my daughter while feeding ...



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