Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

49

Our first couple months were... bad. From that experience I can give you these pieces of advice: Realize that you are most likely not in this alone. Friends and family are a wonderful thing. Especially those that have kids, they'll know and understand. If one of them calls to say they want to come over and see the baby, and asks if you need anything... ...


19

Breastfeeding is hard For all the talk about how "natural" breastfeeding is, nothing quite prepares you for the feeling of being a complete and total failure as a mother quite like having trouble with breastfeeding. It's not easy, you don't "naturally" know exactly how to hold the baby, and he doesn't "naturally" know how to latch on. If your baby latches ...


13

You're not doing it wrong, it is that bad! No matter how much you are warned, nothing can prepare you for the tiredness, on top of the tiredness, on top of even more tiredness, plus the stress of new responsibility and holding down a job. All the parents I've met after the birth of their first share a certain look when talking about this 'special' time. ...


11

Don't be afraid to choose to not breastfeed. I had twins and tried to breastfeed them. It lasted 2 weeks and I gave up and started pumping instead. I got my sanity back and was still able to feed my boys breast milk. I was making enough that they got exclusively breastmilk for 9 of their first 12 months. I felt lucky that I was able to do that. But if ...


10

It's perfectly natural to be somewhat panicked, or worried about losing your sanity. Here is what I learned from the first few months of being a father. Accept that you're in a new situation right now. Becoming parents is the single biggest change in your life, ever. Many of your habits (chores, interests, hobbies) will have to be adapted, and while you ...


9

For me, it boils down to recognizing the difference between importance and urgency. Things can be both important and urgent, important but not urgent, urgent but not important, or neither important nor urgent. You should prioritize them in that order. Helping a screaming infant is both important and urgent. You drop everything to help as soon as ...


8

I would definitely tell him in advance, to give him a chance to process the fact in time, and to say goodbye to the cat. Morah made a good point about leaving the sickness out of the explanation, that may be one strategy. However, my feeling is that telling that the cat just died, without any clear reason, may be equally frightening for the kid if he has a ...


5

I've learned I'm still learning that one of the most important differences between children and parents is that parents are generally able to recognize that they can delay meeting their own needs for a short while. Kids can't do that. Kids need their parents now, or at least they think they do. As parents, we must help our children to tell the difference ...


5

Be Patient Be patient with yourselves, with each other, and with your baby. After the birth of our second child, it took some time for me to decompress her birth not going how I had planned, feeling like a failure because I couldn't take care of both children on my own, feeling overwhelmed, etc. On top of all of those normal feelings, I dealt with ...


4

The moms I have known with GD have benefited from having a lot of protein and eating every few hours, along with moderate exercise ( walking, swimming, yoga) and enough water, like a LOT of water. That said, pregnancy is just hard work! Give yourself a break and don't be afraid to ask for help. Congratulations and good luck!


3

Take a break. Our daughter must not have been more than a few months old when I just needed a break. I put her in her crib ("somewhere safe") and took a 30 minute shower. She cried. A lot. But I needed the break. It would've been worse for us had I not taken the break. Quite frankly, I don't think she cares or remembers anymore (she is 1!). Since then, ...


3

If you can, use some holiday time and take wednesdays off work. I did this in the first few weeks after paternity leave finished. The effect is that you get a little 'mini weekend' to break up the week, so that its only 2 days without help around the house for your other half, rather than 5 days.


3

One thing to remember is that some babies cry more than others, and the amount of crying doesn't necessarily reflect on how well/poorly you are doing as a parent. At least for their first few months, no amount of picking up and calming the child is going to spoil them, so I would definitely recommend doing so when you can (as opposed to the "let them cry it ...


3

I have yet to be in this situation but my instinct would say keep the word sick out of it, for the reason you listed. As well, don't tell him you chose to have the cat put down, that is simply too scary for him. Instead simply say that sometimes living things, like animals and plants and people die. This means that we can't play with them anymore. Then let ...


3

Get out of the house. Put raincover on a stroller and just walk around. Go to library - this is the best. In US they often have a space for kids with toys and baby books. Go to the mall. IKEA (if you have one around) might have a playspace for small kids. Go to the indoor playground. There is got to be a toy which will keep him busy for a while, for my son ...


2

Tiredness Tiredness and diabetes may not be very strongly connected. While rapidly changing sugar levels may introduce additional strain on your body, pregnancy puts even more stress on it on its own. In general, women often feel very tired and weak during the first trimester. My wife slept around 11 hours, lay a lot during the day and felt constantly ...


2

Always be true to yourself. If you feel like helping your kids do it. Never do it out of responsibility or do it because you feel you have to. Emergencies exempted, I always try to talk to my kids and tell them that I will tend to their needs later. I try not to feel that I "sacrifice" my time to tend to their needs over mine. I find that if I do that, it ...


2

Hide. Seriously. Sometimes, when things feel like they're going to spiral out of control, the best thing to do is get the kids cordoned off someplace reasonably safe, then go somewhere else (in the house or yard) and take a few minutes to calm down. Tossing a movie on to the TV and giving the kids a large bowl of popcorn can give you just enough time to ...


2

You need some friends, or at least some other families with kids your own age, with whom you can do some tag teaming. When this kind of day happens, you can call them and ask to visit, or ask them to visit, or setup a "play date." My wife and I had a vocal, energetic, willful toddler. We found a group of families with kids around the same age at our church ...


2

Try taking the child into a new situation - if you're inside the house try taking them outside for a few minutes. Try a different play activity. Maybe try some messy play, like baked-bean painting or rice pudding squidging. Try giving the child something where they're allowed to be "naughty", like ripping up paper (maybe for papier mache) or kicking ...


2

Why is your baby crying? After eliminating all the basic needs: food, sleep, hygiene, wants stimulation, consider to Wear your baby We have a "high-needs" baby (only 3.5 months old) that must be carried. She used to sleep on her swing but not anymore. Consider baby-wearing (slings, baby carriers) and go about your day. The motion and your body heat might ...


2

Keep a muslin by every seat - you will get through several in a day and baby wipes will become your best friend, accept any and all offers of vests and babygro's as they will likely be changed almost hourly - ensure you have a washing machine and tumble dryer/ space for drying as it will be running almost daily. Don't beat yourself up for feeling resentful ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible