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14

The What's Cooking with Kids website has some excellent suggestions on how to ease kids into chopping and there are some excellent alternative chopping equipment out there that I never even thought about. Obviously, you can always turn to the food processor or blender for chopping. These are good, but if yours are like mine, they're a pain in the butt to ...


12

For us it was two simple information radiators: the shopping list on the fridge and the weekly meal plan hung up nearby. Once a child could write, if they used something up they had to write it on the shopping list. If they wanted something we didn't have, they had to write it on the shopping list and we generally bought it. Yes, this resulted in some ...


9

Anything new has the potential for being frightening to a child. Add to that the very real threat of getting burned...it's not surprising that she's being cautious. My son was reluctant to do things like help stir food because of the heat that rises up from the burner. I let him use an oven mitten and soon he was stirring like a champ. Knowing that he ...


8

What a child can do is not the same as what a parent should allow them to do or what a parent should force them to do. If one left whole-grain crackers and cereal on the counter and stocked the fridge with milk, cheese cubes, hummus, fruit, and cut-up veggies, a three-year-old could certainly feed herself whenever she was hungry and satisfy every ...


4

Depends on what you consider a meal. Peanut-butter and Jelly sandwiches? 5 or 6, I expect. Something hot or that requires a knife? You'd have to spend time cooking with them to know when it would be ok. My kids could make batter from scratch and cook pancakes on an electric griddle by themselves at eight, but I wouldn't let them do it without an adult ...


4

Depends on the child, at 6 my daughter could easily make a peanut butter sandwitch or a bowl of cereal... But at 8 my son didn't do either. Now they are 13 and 11, and cook one full family meal a week! I don't think it's bad to have a child make some of their own meals, it's how they learn. I don't mean you should stick them with a microwave meal 3x a ...


3

Yes, she's probably ready. I think the most important criterion in deciding whether or not to try learning to use a knife is willingness to follow directions. If she's not listening to and obeying every word you say, no knife practice, period. That and sufficient gross motor and fine motor skills to control the knife would be important. If she can handle ...


3

Since neither of you knows how to cook you may wish to have a look at CBeebies Cooking Game. The game essentially consists of interactive, visual, step by step instructions of a number of different recipes. The instruction of the recipes used in the game are child friendly and easy to understand. I made tomato spirals last week with a 4 year old. I let her ...


3

For younger kids: One thing that worked for us (once the kids learned to read) was a 2-prong approach: Explain in detail the heathfulness of specific ingredients (starting with "junk"/"good for you" at early age, to more in depth science later on). Have them read all the ingredients on any item in the kitchen, and discuss the items overall healthfulness. ...


2

My children (almost 4 and 2) are a bit scared of the stove as well, and we've been working on this slowly. Currently, the main things they do involving the stove are two things: Adding chocolate chips to pancakes after I've placed them on the griddle Stirring macaroni in boiling water in process of making mac+cheese. Both are things that they really ...


1

You plan a day. You ask them what they want to eat. You then write a shopping list. (You might want to buy some food magazines so that you can cut out pictures of food and use some glue-stick to stick them to your shopping list.) You go shopping. You show them how to buy fruit and veg and meat (if you eat meat). You come home and you cook and get them ...


1

My Kids love "You can cook" by Annabel Karmel. Lots of photos for all important steps, good basic advice plus introduction to nutrition and healthy eating, too, while still easy to understand for kids. Most steps can be done (with occasional help) even by small children. What I like most, is that the recipes are often "kid's favourites" while adding herbs or ...


1

I would say about the age of 6-7 is a good time to start learning making sandwitches and heating milk/pre-made meals in microwave. It may come in handy once the kids go to school instead of kindergarden. Working with tosters, induction plates, other things that get hot but are otherwise safe - some time after they have mastered making sandwitches. 8-9 yo I ...


1

This is just anecdotal obviously, but mine started helping with cutting things when she was 2 years old; mostly cutting mushrooms with a butter knife. She's 4 now and she uses a regular cutting knife on simple things like leek, mushrooms, cucumber and other fairly large or soft goods. She also cut tomatoes into blocks without any help yesterday. I have yet ...


1

We let ours start to chop from about four years old, but to keep things safe we bought a safety knife for them, which is serrated but very blunt, with a rounded end. The serrations will allow the cutting of most vegetables, although tomatoes may just squash. It works perfectly for peppers and carrots. We also found a safe peeler for carrots that reduces ...



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