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There are several reasons not to do that: Infants have very simple minds that can easily be overloaded by too much information. A psychedelic, high-contrast video can do more harm than good. Infants develop best, if more/all senses are used together. That is why those famous toys you hang over their beds look funny, play music and are in range for the ...


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More from Wired http://www.wired.com/2011/10/infant-tv-guidelines/ in 2011 supporting the study mentioned above.


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Certainly, the visual stimulation videos help in cognitive development and there are plenty of researches on this. Nevertheless, we often try to look so far that we ignore a puddle that's very near! The visual things (videos, games or the like) help in cognitive development. However, in the question, OP's confused about videos for infants or for kids. As ...


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Baby Einstein, which used to hold 90% of the "Educational" video market, was forced to offer refunds (link) and change their advertising to reflect that their products do nothing. This article cites The Journal of Pediatrics when stating that "for every hour of baby-video viewing per day, children ages 8 to 16 months knew six to eight fewer words than those ...


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Whatever she wants to do. Seriously - get her outside, and ask her. She can do whatever she wants, so long as it's outside. (And if she wants you to play with her, you should make the time - she'll only be eight once, after all!) And that means leaving the schedule a bit open-ended. Maybe she'll doodle with chalk on the sidewalk. Maybe she'll run around ...


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To be honest, it sounds like the concern should be that there is very little time in the routine to play. Play is essential for children - both physical (running, jumping, dancing, etc) and mental play (board games, computer games, I-Spy etc) so if your difficulty is in fitting that into her routine I would suggest trying to change the routine or all too ...



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