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18

"Porn" runs a wide gamut of idealized or fantasy scenarios. Many, if not most, of pornographic materials, portray intimate relations in a way that is not typical. I would imagine a pornographic movie that depicts the awkward "getting to know each other" phase, dating, and the social and emotional intimacy that most parents would hope their children would ...


10

In psychology we were taught that imaginary friends are very common from ages 3 through 7, and they occur in ~65% cases (both for boys and girls), so that is nothing extraordinary that one should worry about. However, we were also taught it is important for the child to distinguish between the reality and their imaginary friends. It is healthy if those ...


10

My seven year-old only differentiates time out to about a week. He understands longer time intervals, but just doesn't care. To him, if it's not until next week, it may as well be next year. My four year-old often still says "tomorrow" when she means "sometime in the future." However, if I press her, she will admit she didn't mean tomorrow tomorrow, she ...


9

I think that comprehension doesn't come until reading is more effortless for the child. Early on, they're expending all their effort just reading letters and figuring out the words. As a point of reference, I noticed that my oldest daughter seemed to have very poor comprehension through Kindergarten and first grade. It seemed that in second grade the ...


8

Because you care about mathematical concepts and your daughter learning them, most likely she will learn them. You will point them out and talk about them. "see honey, you had one slice of banana, now, you have more slices of banana." You will be drawn to stories that contain math concepts (yes, they are out there) and games that teach mathematical ...


8

Porn is, even to adults, the junk food of sex; it is a complete fantasy, and while some of it may be plausible, the primary reason to watch porn is to see something you're not getting in your everyday life. While a certain amount of such escapism is normal and even healthy, it depicts activities that are typically more fun to do than to watch. A few genres ...


8

I actually assissted in a math classroom for one of my internships to become a teacher. My lead teacher pretty much handed over the control of her "resource class" (those are generally the kids that have the hardest time with math, hate it, and think they don't need it) What I did with them that worked really well, was to present them with a project that ...


7

Your question sounds related to object permanence -- the understanding that an object should still be there even when it's out of sight. There's been research and studies into those ages in which babies start showing an understanding of object permanence. According to wikipedia, by the age of 8 to 12 months, babies will start showing the earliest ...


7

Even I have trouble sometimes comprehending what I am reading while I'm reading it, especially when I am reading aloud, and I'm 30. Often it can be easy to forget to focus on the actual meaning of the passage when reading aloud and just focus on the actual reading. I'd expect this to be even more true for a newer reader. Some people might naturally pay ...


7

Most studies I've found indicates that toddlers will realize that the cute little person in the mirror is them around months 16 - 18, give or take. Free cites: “So Big”: The Development of Body Self-awareness in Toddlers Your Clever Toddler in Week 85: Mirror Recognition Self-Recognition — When Toddlers Know Who That Kid in the Mirror Is Scholarly cites ...


6

This may seem counterintuitive, but babies and small children will do the best at math if they are told stories and learn to tell stories themselves. O'Neille et al. (below) found that storytelling is an essential precursor for the development of logical thinking. This makes sense when you think about the fact that storytelling is ingrained in centuries of ...


6

You should consider a hybrid: tell him facts, but explain how you know that they are true. By engaging with him, you'll both train him to think critically and be able to assess what level of sophistication he can handle. Then you'll know the answer of when and to what extent to transition to experimentation and primary sources not for some average male ...


6

This is completely normally behavior at his age. I would explain that it using the golden rule. He wouldn't want her to interrupt him and start singing his song even louder than him, so he shouldn't do it to her.


6

This is a guess. I'm wondering if it might be a situation where he made the following two, distinct cognitive steps: (1) A while back, he developed the understanding that he could choose things. Make decisions. Affect the outcome. Make his will known, and have it followed. This is a big, important thing to understand, and it gives him control over his ...


5

Piaget's developmental stage theory, despite its wide-ranging impact on education, is highly questionable today in many respects. His research methods were erroneous, and there is plenty of evidence that his overly rigid stage concept is wrong. Milestones based on the theory are also questionable, and in any event general milestones cannot be used to ...


5

You can encourage curiosity - for most of the early formative years you are your children's best role model, so they will take on habits from you. If you are curious about everything and include them in your excitement and enthusiasm, they can be encouraged to be curious too. If you show cynicism about everything, then they may well end up pretty cynical. ...


5

For the record I am looking at this question as two different sub question. First question is when do humans gain temporal awareness? and when are they are they able to make sense of this temporal awareness? (I.E when are humans able to construct a meaningful relationship between their temporal awareness and a language). Also, I think I should make this ...


5

According to Jean Piaget, most children do not reach the level of cognitive development that you are talking about until they're at least 11 years old or older, and from the classes I've taught I would tend to agree with Piaget. We also know that the frontal lobe of the brain, responsible for reasoning, planning, and judgement, isn't fully "connected" so to ...


5

Bless her little heart; what a scary thing to go through. And bless y'all's hearts too; this sounds absolutely horrible to have gone through. Have you looked into therapy? Sounds like something that a professional who has dealt with grief and trauma issues might have some insights in handling.


5

When my oldest was having trouble being dropped at daycare, I moved the decision for how long I would stick around at dropoff onto her. (She was about 3 iirc.) We didn't have a traumatic experience like yours complicating things, but I think this might help for you. I simply told her that each morning I would stay until she told me to go. The immediate ...


5

Don't we all sometimes struggle with this? Probably less with numbers, but certainly sometimes with the alphabet. The reason behind this is how our brain "files" data. Let's take the alphabet, for example: Haven't we all learned the Alphabet Song? Sure, that means we know all the letters but we teach and learn them as a sequence, not as individual items. ...


4

Generally speaking, I believe intrinsic motivation is always stronger and more lasting than extrinsic, and entails fewer risks (e.g. feeling entitled to rewards for routine tasks). Extrinsic vs. intrinsic motivation is touched upon in Why should children be rewarded for good behaviour? and How do I deal with a child that refuses to do a chore or task? ...


4

Sources- Talking Hands by M. Fox & an ASL class I took. I see you are sold on the idea of raising a bilingual kid-- me too, baby just arrived last month, and we're doing Russian, English with ASL. Since I live up the road from Gallaudet, I thought might as well learn real ASL and not baby ASL. Baby ASL is anywhere from 20-50 signs that are used just ...


4

I'm not convinced there's an age at which kids CANNOT learn something. You certainly need the basic building blocks before you can start constructing a tower, but at any age they seem to have the ability to learn all sorts of mathematical concepts. Verbalizing them is something entirely different, of course. First, to directly address your question about ...


4

Based on my comment on Beofett's post, some would say "well, look at you just defending porn." Yeah? So? Porn -- like sex, drugs, and rock n roll -- is a subject to be discussed with your kids. It's not to be taken lightly or assumed that it'll take care of itself in due course... that's honestly how babies get made. I grew up in suburbia and started ...


4

You say the 'first year of school', so I'm not sure if your son is kindergarten or first grade. Unless he has trouble answering questions about what you read to him, I wouldn't worry about comprehension yet. It's important to understand that learning to read is a process that has distinct stages. They go together something like this: Skills for ...


3

There are several reasons not to do that: Infants have very simple minds that can easily be overloaded by too much information. A psychedelic, high-contrast video can do more harm than good. Infants develop best, if more/all senses are used together. That is why those famous toys you hang over their beds look funny, play music and are in range for the ...


3

This article has some interesting insights to why humans are curious, but if by intellectual curiosity you mean academic curiosity, I think everyone has a bit of it in them; it's just a matter of allowing them to choose what they want to discover. For example, for someone who wants to program video games, physics (and in turn calculus), art, and sometimes ...


3

You got some good answers in the comments, so I am summing that up here and adding a few comments of my own. Torben nailed it in the comment: Without going into the details you describe, keep in mind that all children are different. The other kid may be ahead right now but in half a year it can be other way round. Don't compare with others; there are a ...


3

Abstract thinking requires practice. While Piaget's theories about child development are somewhat reliable for young children, the wheels tend to come off the Piaget bus when it comes to abstract thinking and when different people acquire abstract thinking skills. New research now tells us that the adult brain is not really fully developed until well into a ...



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