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14

My rule of thumb is simple: My children are free to make informed decisions about themselves that will not cause extended suffering or a trip to the ER/doctor or worse. So, if it's freezing outside, I won't allow them to risk frostbite. If we're going to be out for a while, I won't allow them to risk hypothermia. If we're going to the car, then into a ...


10

Is this okay? She has been telling me that it's not "normal" or "legit" for her to pay for all of her own clothes... From what you have written, it sounds as though the only major expense you're not assuming is that of clothing. What you are providing is fine, and what you're requiring her to pay for is also fine, I think, though I was a bit more lenient. ...


7

This is entirely up to you. I allowed my kids to choose their clothing from a very early age, but to cover off the particular after issue around cold weather, if they decided not to wear gloves or a hat etc and I thought they would be necessary, I'd take them along with me so that when they got cold they could ask for them, and I'd suggest that next time ...


5

I would be most concerned about the added duration or use that your neighbors may not appreciate. For my routine I have to pre-wash which takes about 1:10 in my machine, followed by a heavy wash with extra rinse which takes another 1:25 in the same machine. After the wash, I also end up drying for two cycles or about 1:15 total dry as the brand I use can ...


5

Nappies require a lot of washing and rinsing. You'll likely be doing a wash every other day. This increased time might be seen as problematic by other residents. But I suspect your question is about poo: you don't put much poo into the machine. Many cloth nappies use a biodegradable disposable liner which collects most poo, leaving the nappy much easier ...


4

We had good luck using a product called Sock Ons (http://www.sockons.co.uk/products/sockons/). They go over the sock and for our daughter at least did a great job keeping the sock in place.


3

I think I would differentiate between "Warm clothes" and the often-uncomfortable outside layer (gloves, hats, scarves, coats). Warm non-outerwear is harder to change later; warm outerwear is easier. Since kids at that age have a hard time planning for future difficulty, I tend to give more flexibility with the outerwear than the non-outerwear. For us, 4 ...


3

You could use pre-walking shoes for when you go out doors. This type of shoes are flexible rather than provide a rigid support and are normally shaped like the child's foot.


1

You have to realize that she's only five months old.. They enjoy playing with things, including their own clothes. They'll take things apart, try and put them back together, move things around, take things off, etc. It's all a part of the psychological process of growing up. She'll grow out of it eventually. If not, I second @Dariusz with the duct tape. ...



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