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34

The words "efficient" and "toddler" don't really go together. Mostly, you just have to accept that things like getting dressed will take a lot longer while they are learning, and plan time in your schedule for it*. There are a few tricks that can make it a little easier, though. Have one parent hold the child still and assist while the other does the ...


8

In my experience, we had stages roughly like this: 12 months: Put arms through sleeves. Prior to this I began by puting shirt over neck, then positioned the hand in the arm hole, and then getting him to move his arm through the sleeve. That moved into him finding the arm holes mostly on his own by 12-15 months. That's probably the single biggest time ...


7

I agree that it can be a bother to close a onesie all the way down and find one snap left over. But it's no different than when I button up my shirt (except I wiggle less). I can think of a number of reasons why snaps are used so often: they're not a zipper. The end of a zipper can be pointy which can irritate, and the zipper itself can add just enough ...


6

Toddler? One word: Smartphone. There is some great advice above, but in an emergency popping Elmo or a basketball game on a phone and handing it to the toddler can be a bailout when they are frustrated. Somewhat counterintuitively it even helps them focus on the hand that's going through a sleeve by having a big phone clenched in the other hand. We're not ...


5

The simple answer is that there is nothing easier (with the possible exception of velcro, but one side of velcro is scratchy so a baby might not like that, and you sometimes have to pull velcro really hard) You can work snaps with one hand, even with a wriggling child. If your worst case scenario is that you missed a snap - it's only going to add a minute. ...


5

I think the response is typical for kids that age. Even through the teen years, kids lack the ability to necessarily understand "why" they did something. Given that he does tuck it in when asked and without objections, I'd say just keep reminding him, and don't make a huge deal out of it. Eventually he might start doing it on his own, and if not, I suspect ...


4

My daughters loved to be in the nude when they were babies. They giggled and wiggled like crazy and it was delightful to look at them. When it comes to temperature, follow your instinct. Put your baby always on a blanket, because objects on the grass can vary from flowers to dog poop or broken glass. I would say, choose a really warm day, one of these ...


4

What other approaches can I try to deal with that situation? I see five general options: Take Valkyrie's approach of hacking your own footie pajamas. Make the children's room colder, to encourage them to want socks on. This doesn't strike me as a great approach, since they may simply bundle up in more blankets, rather than put on socks. Make the ...


4

It's going to be really hard to pin down a single cause, unless he can tell you himself (I assume you asked him already). Ties represent authority and responsibility, particularly when worn in media, whether it is on the news or in a children's show. He may have seen people wearing ties on TV and decided that that was pretty cool. He may simply find them ...


3

Both @Torben and @Rory give good answers about why snaps are a popular choice. I will add that is more about bad design and cheap snaps that make the snapping experience bad. The female and male parts on a good design are not all on the same side, separating the snaps in shorter independent series.


3

No it isn't normal, in the sense that most kids don't do that. However, just because a child does something that isn't normal, it doesn't immediately mean they are autistic. Perhaps he likes the feel of clothes moving on his skin? You don't say what you or the parents are doing to stop him doing this? If you are not doing anything, why should he stop? ...


3

The simple reason is because "I don't know" sounds better than "I forgot". "I forgot" implies admission and lays direct blame on the subject being asked. "I don't know", while somewhat implying admission, it doesn't place direct blame. How do you fix it? Your remind him to tuck his shirt in every day until the one day he comes out of his room dressed ...


3

If you're insisting on the socks staying on no matter what, you might have to hack some footie pajamas of your own. Sew some thick long socks to the legs of the pj's; that should do it.


3

The skin area-to-weight ratio is highest for newborns and decreseas as children grow. They lose heat faster than we do, but they also absorb external heat faster. Therefore, when the temperature's relatively high ~25C but the sun is shining brightly it may be OK to leave the baby to play naked. However, the same ~25C in shade may be much too cold for an ...


2

Something I've noticed with my kids is that young children are repeaters. They watch the same episodes on Netflixs over and over again. They play the same games over again and the same toys over again. They want to always wear their favorite PJs, and to always have their favorite teddy bear. For them this repeating helps define the constants in their ...


2

If the baby is old enough to be toddling around and there is a warm breeze, mid 70's Fahrenheit. Infant, upper 70's, shade, warm breeze. I would always keep a receiving or other light blanket around. If the baby has goose bumps, put a t-shirt or onesie on the child unless they appear to be just a random thing.


2

I just plop the t-shirt over their head and let them have fun finding the arm-holes. For pants and shoes, I just lift one of their feet, causing them to instinctively reach for the nearest hand-hold to keep their balance--usually my ear or hair.


2

I'll often sit with my legs crossed, set them in my lap, plop the head through the neck hole, then reach through the sleeves, grab their hands, and pull them through. Then I put their legs in the pants, stand them up while I'm still sitting and pull their pants up the rest of the way, and their shirt down. As they grow I work on having them lift their legs ...


1

Garters are made for the express purpose of keeping socks pulled up. Might be worth a try. Also, while somewhat hard to find, footed sleepers for bigger kids are totally available. My 5'4" 13-year-old has a set that he still wears; they're Cherokee, one of the Target house brands, though I don't see anything on their site right now. But Big Feet PJs seems ...


1

Kids can have amusing habits and behaviours, especially when learning and exploring something new. As your grandson is 3, I imagine that he has only recently been able to change his clothing fully unassisted, so it could just be the novelty of having a new outfit. In all likelihood it will pass.


1

Kids at three like to feel they have some control even though they really aren't ready for a lot of control yet. First, I suggest having a schedule or routine everyday that is predictable and even posted for your child (using pictures). Having it be predictable for your child when getting dressed will be required actually helps him feel "in control." If ...


1

I think kids should start dressing themselves at the age of 2 and half years. But parents should always teach the children. My kids were able to undress themselves at the age 2. By the age of 2.5 they could put on the pants, socks, trousers, hat. I bought them Shoosey to teach them how to tie laces (but it was when they were 3)



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