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33

The words "efficient" and "toddler" don't really go together. Mostly, you just have to accept that things like getting dressed will take a lot longer while they are learning, and plan time in your schedule for it*. There are a few tricks that can make it a little easier, though. Have one parent hold the child still and assist while the other does the ...


15

Certainly people lived and existed before clothes were invented, so to some extent one could claim we don't "need" clothes. However clothes, especially for tiny babies, serve purposes other than warmth: absorbency. Babies don't just leak from the diaper area: they drool, spit up, and just like us, they sweat. Most baby-specific clothes are very absorbent ...


12

It is perfectly normal - in our garden in the summer my kids were still running round naked at 6 or 7 years old, but by that age they have enough personal modesty that they put clothes back on if we have visitors. At 1 1/2, they just don't have that sense of modesty so you have to find a way of being their modesty filter for them, without making them feel ...


12

Being naked is fun...for children. It can be very freeing. However, I understand your concern. I think most children go through some period of this desire (my children often want to sleep naked). There is nothing wrong with a child being naked but this must have limits. I taught my children about private areas very early and I would insist that your ...


12

Kids are all different. I'd be surprised if a 2yo were completely dressing/undressing him/her-self all the time. I'd be surprised if a 6yo were not doing so. If you want to encourage self-dressing, buy the easiest-to-use clothes possible: velcro shoes, elastic pants, shirts that button or snap rather than pull over the head.


12

He has learned that if he doesn't get dressed he gets rewarded with candy. One thing I've learned is never to reward children for doing something basic that they should be doing anyway, otherwise they will expect a reward every time they do it. So: Give lots of extra time to get kids dressed. When planning I always leave 20 minutes for that with my 3 year ...


10

As HedgeMage said, all kids are different, but you can look here: http://www.babycenter.com/0_toddler-milestone-self-care_6503.bc for general idea. It says there that at yours age child should already be able to take off his clothes, but only after 3 or even 4 he will be able to get dressed all by himself.


8

Whether it causes resentment or not depends on how much say the child has in the matter. Kids often borrow their older sibling's clothing on their own. A lot of handing down happens even without parental intervention, as one child starts to grow out of something, they are more and more willing to lend it to their younger sibling, until it ends up de facto ...


8

The reasoning behind the wrapping is that the birth is quite an environmental change to the baby: You're safe in a nice and warm and soft womb, but suddenly this is replaced by light and air and space and hands and surfaces. Wrapping the baby gives some comfort (although not all babies like being wrapped, they enjoy their newly-won freedom). If you're in a ...


7

I agree that it can be a bother to close a onesie all the way down and find one snap left over. But it's no different than when I button up my shirt (except I wiggle less). I can think of a number of reasons why snaps are used so often: they're not a zipper. The end of a zipper can be pointy which can irritate, and the zipper itself can add just enough ...


7

In my experience, we had stages roughly like this: 12 months: Put arms through sleeves. Prior to this I began by puting shirt over neck, then positioned the hand in the arm hole, and then getting him to move his arm through the sleeve. That moved into him finding the arm holes mostly on his own by 12-15 months. That's probably the single biggest time ...


6

Light clothing. My daughter was born at the height of summer around here which generally averages in the mid to upper 90s degrees Fahrenheit (32+ degrees Celcius). Granted, not quite as hot as 113 degrees Fahrenheit... Onesies are your best friend. Short-sleeved onesies with no legs like these. If your baby starts to get cold, you can always throw a ...


6

There are many different levels of motor skills, body awareness/schema, and visual motor perceptual skills required for the various aspects of undressing/dressing. Refining all of these skills may not be completed until 3-4 years of age. However, I do have a suggestion for encouraging her "next step" in each task. In therapy, we use "backward chaining" to ...


6

Be sure that you are certain about what the common factor is. It might appear to be the long vs. short but it might also be a texture thing. For a while my son would refuse to wear anything but soft clothing most of which were long like sweat pants and warm long sleeved shirts. I have to disagree with what Rory said though. I reserve such draconian measures ...


6

If you don't buy long sleeved shirts and trousers he won't be able to wear them. If you want to limit what a child wears, it is easier to only give them choices which you approve of. If the trousers are wearing out, perhaps they should be thrown away and new ones not bought until the winter. For ones that aren't wearing out, hide them away during the ...


6

I don't personally subscribe to "children should be allowed to run around naked all the time" concept, though I know parents who do. Though I have had issues with getting my son out of his pajamas and into regular clothing. I started by making it a rule that the first thing we do when we get up in the morning is get dressed. I do it, my husband does it, I ...


6

Toddler? One word: Smartphone. There is some great advice above, but in an emergency popping Elmo or a basketball game on a phone and handing it to the toddler can be a bailout when they are frustrated. Somewhat counterintuitively it even helps them focus on the hand that's going through a sleeve by having a big phone clenched in the other hand. We're not ...


5

At that age kids like to wear different clothes - two of my kids did exactly that: they'd vanish to their room and come back in something entirely different. If he is demanding that you change his clothes for him, make it more of a game, but ask which ones he'll want for the morning and which ones for the afternoon. Distraction techniques work as well - ...


5

I would only purchase what is needed now, for a number of reasons. The rate of a child's growth is not linear. The child might take stay at size 5 for 8 months then be at size 8 2 months later. Or the feet might not grow but the child gets taller. What you like now you (or the child) might not like in 6 months. My home had far too much kid stuff ...


5

The simple answer is that there is nothing easier (with the possible exception of velcro, but one side of velcro is scratchy so a baby might not like that, and you sometimes have to pull velcro really hard) You can work snaps with one hand, even with a wriggling child. If your worst case scenario is that you missed a snap - it's only going to add a minute. ...


4

The X months sizing system for baby clothes is far from accurate. Cloths of the same supposed size (say, all 3 months) from different manufacturers or different styles can vary dramatically in actual size. Then there's the fact that there is no standard size for a 3 month old baby. My 12 month old fits snugly in 18mo clothing. And my friend's 12mo old ...


3

All my daughters' shoes are hand-me-downs except for her athletic shoes. I figure she isn't spending enough time in her other shoes to cause any serious damage. Let me elaborate. I had an aunt that bought my sister and I special shoes designed to help children walk correctly and healthfully and gave those shoes to my parents. She continued to "keep us in ...


3

I found that my kids were not great at telling me when shoes were to small and I did find that they made big jumps, so I wouldn't buy all the sizes together. I also found that Target and Costco often have sales on shoes for young ones, so I wouldn't worry about not being able to find shoes when needed. I also pass down shoes through children. As they get ...


3

My son, age 3 1/2, loves to wear costumes. He immediately changes into a costume when he gets home from school everyday and wears if for the rest of the day (he doesn't necessarily play like the character he has become, but he just likes to wear it). In the mornings he is very particular about what he wears (has to be soft and fuzzy) and gets very upset when ...


3

Although it is perfectly normal, if it continues and spreads to other tactile issues, I would watch it closely. There are some issues, such as ASD that can be indicated by tactile issues. I think we all have things that we don't like touching - sticky, dirty, itchy, etc. but if there is an excessive amount of issues like that in addition to wanting to be ...


3

Just adding to the chorus...clothes, for the most part, suck! Our 10 year old still will often come in the house after school and the first thing he does is strip to his underwear. Now that I work at home, even as an adult, there are many days that I'm wearing the same. ;) So, that doesn't help solve your problem, but hopefully reassures you that there ...


3

I've often heard the advice to dress like an onion: We've learned from sports clothing that it's practical to wear several layers of relatively thin clothing, so that you can peel off layers according to the temperature. Here's an example: Undergarments should be able to transport moisture away from the skin; then have a layer of e.g. cotton clothing ...


3

No it isn't normal, in the sense that most kids don't do that. However, just because a child does something that isn't normal, it doesn't immediately mean they are autistic. Perhaps he likes the feel of clothes moving on his skin? You don't say what you or the parents are doing to stop him doing this? If you are not doing anything, why should he stop? ...


3

Both @Torben and @Rory give good answers about why snaps are a popular choice. I will add that is more about bad design and cheap snaps that make the snapping experience bad. The female and male parts on a good design are not all on the same side, separating the snaps in shorter independent series.


2

Your daughter sounds right on track. I think the important thing is to continue to let her try even if she doesn't succeed. I've seen parents say "she isn't old enough" to do something, so they always do it for her, then wonder why when she is "old enough" she doesn't suddenly know how to do it.



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