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17

Cloth diapering can be much more cost efficient than using disposables - including the cost of washing. There are many types of modern cloth diapers, and the cost of diapering largely depends on the type of diaper chosen, as well as the brand of that diaper. Most types are sold with an organic option, which will also raise the price of the diaper. ...


14

Bleach is really harsh on cloth diapers and sure your diapers will be "germ free" but bleach can really hinder the absorbency of the fibers because it can degrade them. The most common and effective way people try to remove the stains from cloth diapers is sunning them to dry. The sun acts as a natural bleach. That site talks about adding lemon juice, ...


11

No, I can not see why these are necessary. You can affix a diaper in a way that does not cover the infant's belly button. I have used cloth diapers with two children, and commend you for doing so. However, it is worth it to consider using disposables for the first few weeks. Especially the first days when the tarry black meconium is coming out, but also in ...


10

We washed our own cloth diapers with our first child, and only used disposable on trips. With our second, we did mostly cloth for the first year of her life, then mostly disposable for the second. We actually bought a front-loading washer, and it paid for itself in water and electricity bills within a few years. In my experience, cloth diapers are quite a ...


9

There exists a UK study dating from 2005, which was updated in 2008. A good summary can be found at the Kimberly-Clark Australia and New Zealand homepage. To summarise the summary: It depends... If you are always washing the fabric diapers at 95 °C and put them in the dryer, the overall energy use will be higher than if you use disposable diapers. If you ...


8

You seem to have tried everything short of making your own detergent, and yet cloth diapers = blisters, disposable = no blisters. Seems a done deal to me. Although we use disposables, if we had the same experience but the other way around, I'd switch to cloth diapers in the blink of an eye.


7

Having used both types of diapers with our kids, I found there are advantages and disadvantages to each. Where cloth diapers have the advantage: Cloth diapers are touted as more environmentally friendly Cloth is often cheaper in the long run Cloth is said to lead to easier eventual potty training (several cloth diaper delivery services such as Happy ...


7

Some babies are extremely sensitive, and will cry about the slightest wetness. Some babies will have a huge soaking blowout in the middle of the night and barely make a peep. We've had both ways. If you're lucky, your baby will be somewhere in between. Newborns wake up to get fed a lot, so generally you'll be just fine if you check the diaper just before ...


6

Depends. We used cloth diapers because the alternative (unscented, non-chlorinated, not full-of-crap disposables) are quite expensive compared to the Huggies/Pampers alternative. We also feel that she is less likely to get rashes from cloth diapers and we aren't lazy when changing her diapers (you go through more cloth diapers than you would through ...


6

In general, an hour or two between changes is fairly typical. It takes a while to produce more urine or feces, so you can expect more than 15 minutes before diaper changes. Waiting for the infant to cry is not perfectly reliable, because some children don't seem to mind wet diapers -- my youngest finds a wet diaper to be pure torture, my oldest couldn't ...


6

I tried this but found the ammonia smell wasn't washed out of the diapers when dry. I have a high efficiency washer though so it may have a different outcome if you're using a standard top loader (more water!). Other variables to consider are how sensitive your kids bum is, type of detergent and how smelly their pee is... YMMV. Why not give it a shot?


5

Newborns need to be checked and changed much more frequently than older babies, simply because they poo more often. For the first few weeks, you can expect some poo in almost every nappy / diaper, and should check every half hour or so if they're awake, probably changing once every 2 or 3 hours. If they're asleep I wouldn't bother waking them up to check / ...


5

From the research I'd done, if you clean the cloth diapers yourself, it will wind up being cheaper than disposables. How much cheaper depends on things such as how you clean them (by hand, or in an electric washing machine, plus the number of diapers cleaned in each load), how much you are paying for water, soap etc.. However, if you are using a diaper ...


4

Sunning the diapers is certainly the best (and most natural) method, but that does assume that you will have decent enough weather. When the weather doesn't allow for sunning, we add a small amount of OxiClean Free to our wash cycle. This helps to whiten the diapers and doesn't leave a residue.


4

Greenmountain sells diapers that come in sizes of upto 40 lbs. You can probably just get away with just the large size, but if you're more comfortable, use the extra large. If it's too big on your baby, you can fold it (that's what we did) at the top. Are you into sewing? If so, you can also sew your own pre-folds. Word of caution: Our daughter is 13 ...


4

This is a tough call, since your son is suffering but it definitely seems like it is a detergent issue due to the fact that it doesn't happen after you strip them. Both of the detergents you have used are listed as 5 stars in this list of cloth diaper detergents but that doesn't mean much. It may take trying several different detergent types to get one ...


4

An alternative I've seen is gDiapers which are sort of a cross between disposable and cloth diapers. Basically, there is a reusable cover that go along with a disposable insert that fully dissolves in the toilet or go into the compost after use. On their website, there are many videos of the gDiapers in action including this one. We tried them on our son ...


4

In China, babies and toddlers wander around without diapers, only a flap in the back of their clothes, even in the coldest winter, in order to quickly do their business. Apparently, they can potty train from as early as two months (hearsay). How could a nation of over a billion people be wrong?


3

Yes they are much cheaper, my total investment to date is $315, and my son is 14 months old. Prefolds are $1 per diaper in bulk, and I have around 60 of them, and then I bought Thirsties Duo covers at $10 per cover, which I have 10 of. You only change the cover if it gets soiled by a BM, or after a full day of use. I also use Kawaii diapers for day care, ...


3

We cloth diaper almost solely for the cost benefits. We calculated that given our needs, we would break even in about 3 months. We do not however use bumGenius or gdiapers. There are many other options that are as easy to use and far less expensive. Kawaii diapers are one example of a modern low cost diaper.


3

I really don't think that cloth save that much more than disposable when you factor in other things. For example, the only day care around that allowed me to do cloth charged $40 more a week to take my kid. It also wasn't a state registered day care. Your milage may vary there. Then, looking at it from the viewpoint of a working mom- every night doing ...


2

My wife and I have been evaluating this recently, as well. Our initial cost for cloth diapers (if she doesn't make them) will be about $600. They'll last for an expected two+ years. Disposables over the same time period we estimate will cost us about $2500. For us, as long as we spend less than $1900 in additional laundry costs, we're ahead.


2

It depends on how much you use them! If you use them at all times - certainly. But if you're like us, it's quite likely you won't. We originally got MamaBless cloth diapers with bambino mio diaper covers and flushable liners. We like them a lot - mostly because they're just nicer than the plastic kind. We also hope that they will help speed up toilet ...


2

I actually used cloth diapers for my son because I find it cheaper compared with using diapers. Even if you have to wash the cloth diapers and spend for water, detergent and so on, you can still use cloth diapers in a longer run which will make it cheaper, compared with diapers. Newborn babies also tend to pee a lot, so a diaper can only lasts for four ...


2

We use cloth diapers for our son and mostly it's been a positive experience. Chris has outlined nicely the positives and negatives of cloth and disposable in his answer so I just want to add some advice if you do decide to use cloth. We were given as a gift a sample of different cloth diapers from a many several manufacturers. I think there were about 10 ...


2

I don't know if there are specific or recomended rules of thumb for this, but we have been using the same brand of diapers as you for our son since he was 2 months old (he's now nearly 19 months) and had similar problems with leaking. When he was your son's age, we had three buttons open in the middle and he leaked through during the night approximately 75% ...


2

If you live in or near a major city, there are a lot of cloth diaper delivery services that will manage pickup/delivery/cleaning of cloth diapers, saving you a lot of the hassle. Dirty diapers go in a bin, get picked up and replaced with clean ones by the service once a week. We used Happy Nappy for our first child, and it was just as easy as disposables ...


2

Try Elimination Communication. Offer opportunities to use the bathroom At opportunistic times (after naps, half an hour after bottle/breastfeeding, before meals, before and after car rides, etc.) When your baby has a worried (deer-in-headlights) look on his/her face When your baby is gassy, has low appetite, or is making grunting noises You general ...


2

Since first rinse is only done to wash out urine and poop, and later you wash it again more thoroughly with clothes, you don't really need any detergent for that first wash. Baking soda is enough of a detergent to do the job any way... I used to rinse off any poop left on the diapers (what slipped off the liners) and then simply throw them in with the ...


2

Based on Vicky's comment to just try it, and in response to Guillaume's comment/question, I did try to put the ~15 diapers through a single wash cycle, and there is some residual smell compared to diapers which are put through a single wash cycle with ~15 diapers, then washed a second time with other laundry to make a full laundry load. Using two wash cycles ...



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