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19

With our 3.5 year old son, we do this by making sure he knows that he won't get to do the next thing until he puts away his toys. Want to watch TV? Put away your toys. Want to eat some snack food? Put away toys. Play hide and seek (his favorite game) or get thrown onto the bed? Put away your toys. Once he believed us, that he wasn't going to get away ...


14

Bleach is really harsh on cloth diapers and sure your diapers will be "germ free" but bleach can really hinder the absorbency of the fibers because it can degrade them. The most common and effective way people try to remove the stains from cloth diapers is sunning them to dry. The sun acts as a natural bleach. That site talks about adding lemon juice, ...


9

I decided to go and hunt down an answer for this because although so far we have managed to keep playdough in the kitchen, which has a wooden floor, it is bound to happen sometime. So, the official line from Hasbro is: “When attempting to remove PLAY-DOH compound do NOT use hot water or cleaning solutions of any kind. To remove PLAY-DOH compound from ...


8

I have a slightly different take than the answers I've read here: listen to the child - "there are too many toys" - have you taken a look around? I bet you've got a lot of toys, and I bet your child needs almost none of them. My kids (1, 2, and 4) love to play with a toy for 1 minute, then chuck it, and move on. It makes a tremendous mess. However, they ...


8

Whenever possible, throw them out. You can't, unfortunately always do that (well you can, if you're ready for the consequences of being responsible for ducky's untimely demise). I did this, which worked. Submerge the toy in a 70% solution of rubbing alcohol. Squeeze it quite a few times Repeat this process in hot (as you can tolerate) soapy water Repeat ...


8

We use Seventh Generation products and their Natural Baby Laundry Detergent. It is not tested on animals. There was a consumer who was worried that their products are tested on animals, not by the company, but by a 3rd party (see link). However, Seventh Generation responded by saying that they use existing test data which was received when they licensed ...


8

Toddlers eat dirt and survive, sure. But infants haven't built up a solid immune system to deal with random dirt, so avoiding unnecessary exposure would be wise. I'm sorry but I would agree with your wife. The problem is that a kitchen cloth is actually often not very clean because it's often not rinsed well between uses and isn't replaced often enough. ...


7

It helps if cleaning is a standard part of every activity rather than a big event. For example, you can make a rule that she can't play with a new toy until the previous toys are put away. If she can't grab a new toy until she's cleaned up, then she only has to clean up one toy at a time. If she isn't already in the habit of cleaning up, it may take her a ...


7

Instead of a weekly job fit only for Hercules, we incorporate clean-up into our daily bedtime routine: clean up, brush teeth, shower/bath, pyjamas, bedtime story, nighty-night. It's not negotiable, it's communal (we all help clean up), and it's supervised (he can't play anymore once clean-up starts), so it goes fairly smoothly and is usually over in ...


5

Any time, really - no transition work was needed as they saw that we preferred showers so obviously they wanted the same thing. We started ours from around 18 months as they really enjoyed the spray. What we would typically do at that age is just take them in with us - and they can learn to close their eyes and tip their head back to avoid bubbles in their ...


5

I would just follow through more and not accept the "I'll remember next time" as an answer. "Well, clearly that's not working. So let's try something new. What would help you remember?" You could offer up some solutions, and let her pick one. Try it for a week. If it's not working, back to the drawing board. And, when she's agreed to do something, like if ...


5

make this activity fun for her. Make up some game: Like who will gather three red toys faster? or what toy should go to what box? or take a big bag, draw a funny face on it and tell your baby - "this is mr. ToyBag. He likes toys. Lets give him some. would you like this pink truck, mr ToyBag? I see you like it a lot" Another way, tell her that toys want to ...


5

You could try a quite natural method – air it in the sun for several hours. I'd be worried, though, about really getting rid of the ingrained smoke residue (and whatever other harmful chemicals came along with it). If it's in the mattress, you'll never get it rid of it. I wouldn't even consider using the Pack-'N-Play after it has been in a house of ...


4

Sunning the diapers is certainly the best (and most natural) method, but that does assume that you will have decent enough weather. When the weather doesn't allow for sunning, we add a small amount of OxiClean Free to our wash cycle. This helps to whiten the diapers and doesn't leave a residue.


4

To piggy-back just a bit on what Rory said, we regularly fill a sink with 4 parts water to 1 part bleach, drop the ducks in there, squeeze them a couple of times to fill them with the solution, and let them sit for a while (usually overnight). In the a.m., we empty the solution, squeeze the water out of them, fill the sink again with clean water, repeat the ...


4

You could try laundering the toys anyway if you believe that they would be suited for it despite their label. Of course don't risk it with the most precious toy... Usually though, nonlaunderable (is that a word?) toys have instructions how to care for them. That most often boils down to wiping the surface with a cloth moist with lukewarm water and mild ...


4

Allow the problem to solve itself. Explain that any toys that aren't picked up, get placed into the Toy Void. These toys can be given away to charity, or you could allow the child to retrieve one toy from the void whenever they successfully pick up their toys after being asked. If they don't pick up their toys after being asked, new toys will be added to ...


4

I taught twos, threes and fours for a few years. There isn't a lot you can do about the stuffed toys except put them in the laundry every so often, but here is what I did in my classroom in regard to the plastic stuff. Keep bleach locked away somewhere. At the end of the day put a capfull in a bucket of water and throw in the toys that were licked or ...


3

Similar to @Balanced - I bought my kids a few kilos of lego off eBay, and when it arrived I was a bit concerned with cleanliness. Some of the bricks smelled, some were sticky, some had obviously been outside in a sandpit etc. So we filled a bath with water and some Milton (very mild bleach suitable for children's toys) and washed all the bricks. To rinse ...


3

The milk fat is easily washed away, so I would rule that out. I think what you're seeing is the dried calcium of the tap water, especially if it seems powdery and can be rubbed off when dry. I think this is what user77907 means by scale. This is especially the case if your tap water is very hard. You need not worry about these deposits: according to ...


3

We have three solutions to this, depending on the toy: If the toy is a must-have: A solution of Milton, or other mild sterilising solution If we can modify it a bit: drill more holes in it to get a proper cleaning flow through If it is unloved enough: ditch it In saying that, though - most of our ducks are owned by the parents, not the kids (it started ...


3

I agree fully with Rory's answer. But something else that was helpful is doing graduated supervision. So first it's them in the shower with you, then you sitting on the bathroom floor or somewhere in the bathroom while they shower, and then it's them in the master bathroom and you in the bedroom if you have that set up. My little sister is twelve years ...


3

Infant: When my first son was still an infant, I would sometimes take him on my arm and shower with him. My wife would take him out and dry him while I showered myself. He loved the sensation of water falling on him. Age 1: We have a tub/shower combination so whenever he was done with a bath in the tub (on his own, with one parent watching from the side), ...


3

First, I would suggest that you instate a rule that means the kids clean up every 1 or 2 hours so things are less daunting at the end of when it is time to leave. Another way to meet the same goal is to clean up each activity that gets done before moving on to the next activity. There should never be a situation where more than one room is messy at a time ...


3

Don't let it get that messy to begin with. If you've given the kids free reign for 2½ days then it's no big wonder that cleaning up is almost impossible. We have a house rule that all toys are cleared away before bedtime. This is part of the regular bedtime ritual. When you have guests over and the clutter is much worse, I would even add another clean-up ...


3

You could TRY scrubbing the non-removable fabric pieces with a mixture of 1 part bleach/4 parts water, and then letting it dry in the sun as @Dave Clarke suggested. However, that's iffy. There are so many toxic chemicals in cigarette smoke that I'm not sure ANYTHING short of an autoclave could get them out. I vote for thank the friends and toss it and get ...


2

I'd suggest using one of those spray on spot removers and using it right after the clothes have been worn and slightly cleaned, don't let the spots sit on there longer than they have to. Took me a few washes but once I kept on top of it the stains are not that noticable anymore, although washing the clothes with color safe bleach also helped me out. ...


2

As a non-natural product option I would suggest researching regular detergents that are made fragrance free and/or are specifically for people with sensitive skin. My doctor actually recommended staying away from Dreft and other products specifically made for babies. They have fragrances and chemicals in them that may negatively affect babies skin.


2

I would recommend to look at iHerb online store. It supplies a vast selection of brand name natural products. Especially you can check Baby, Laundry Detergent category. Most of the products there aren't animal tested (this fact is denoted in description of the product). I don't know where are you from, but I'm personally from Israel and it's also cheaper to ...


2

The simple answer is not to buy bathtub toys that squirt water. You can still have squirty fun. Just keep old shower jel bottles and use them instead. They hold a lot of water, and can be binned without worrying about cost. Sooner or later, you will forget to clean your rubber duck, and it will fill with moldy sludge. This will both smell and be a health ...



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