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19

| Infant Carrier | Convertible Seat | Car seat | Booster | No Seat | Front Seat | ============================================================================================================================ Age Range | birth - 1 yr | birth - 2 yr (rear) | 1 - 4 yr | 4 - 10 yr | over 10 yr | ...


16

No. I would not risk it. Usually the manual will say not to use the unit if it's damaged, or even to use it if it's older than a few years. Parts may look just little bit damaged, but that little bit can cause a failure during an accident that will leave your little one hurt. Of course, like everything else, there's a tradeoff between cost (in this case ...


12

Many people get motion sick when moving backwards for any length of time. I suspect that this might be the case for your daughter because her older sister did better once she was front-facing. If this is the case, the second your daughter hits the car seat, she knows that horrible feeling is coming, but she doesn't know why or how to tell you. I would ...


12

We fully covered our baby only as protection against foul weather when outside, and against light and noise when inside (restaurant etc). And also to help him sleep or fall asleep. Other than that, I see no reason to fully cover a baby. Covering him partially makes sense of course, to keep him warm without denying him a view of where he is and what's going ...


10

First off, this is not medical or legal advice, and no answer from a site like this should be relied upon; ask your pediatrician for the best advice. It is never safer for a child to sit in the front seat. (Similarly, it is never safer for an adult; the rear seat is simply safer in general.) The recommendations of child safety organizations are generally ...


9

The thing a lot of people don't know about shoulder belts is if you pull them all the way out as far as they will go, the latching system will stay engaged and will only tighten, not loosen, until it is all the way retracted again. This mode was designed specifically for car seats and children in booster seats. Children's small size makes it take longer ...


8

Probably paranoia. Other possiblity is that the baby is asleep and they are using the cover as a noise and light barrier. Personally, my wife and I never used covered the carrier for any reason other than weather, like you.


8

The only reason I ever covered my children during transport was to keep them warm and keep the weather off them.


8

Better for your wallet: the convertible. Better for your infant's spine: the infant seat. The Austrian automobile club recommends to use infant seats for infants and not convertibles and my wife who is a trained physio therapist explains why: infants' spines are not fully developed, which means that infants should never sit or even recline until they are ...


7

Nope. If you would be more comfortable keeping an eye on them, there are mirrors you can install that allow you to see them in your rear view mirror. However, you will be wise to watch the road instead of the sleeping babies in the back seat; every newborn I've ever met just sleeps in the car so you won't be missing much.


6

Both of our daughters did this, and it wasn't just the car seat, it was strollers too. They hated to be strapped into something. We made sure the straps weren't hurting them in any way. One thing our pediatrician suggested was to make sure that we didn't just feed them before putting them in a stroller or carseat because the sitting position could be ...


6

Unfortunately very few cars properly fit 3 car seats, and cramming them all in there may actually decrease the safety of the seat. If you do end up putting one in the front seat, make sure you consider the front passenger air bags - they need to be disabled for many car seats or they can cause significant harm.


6

What my husband and I have discovered recently is that your requirements can change significantly between child 1 and child 2. When we bought my car (6 years ago), it was a significant step up in size from my 4-door sedan to a full-size 2-row SUV. My son was born a year later. My daughter was born in July 2010 and my car, which obviously hasn't changed in ...


6

The bad news is your baby is going to make you stop whether you want to or not. The good news is that makes it so you don't really have to guess how long is too long. You know how long you go between diaper changes and feedings now. Plan to stop at those intervals at the very least, then double it to get a probable worst case. As for how long you ...


5

Although Sarato has given a good general overview, The answer to this will vary depending on the make and model of the carseats as well as local laws. For example, some infant carrier carseats support a weight limit of 22 lb, but others have a weight limit of 30 lb. An infant carrier carseat can be used as long as the child is within the height and weight ...


5

Do you have a mirror in your car - the type that attaches to the headrest to let you see the baby? When I removed the mirror, my son was much better about crying in the car seat. The mirror does some perspective distortion and I imagine it is confusing seeing things in reverse for them. I also removed the headrest from directly behind the car seat which ...


5

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that once children transition from rear-facing seats, they should stay in forward-facing seats with a harness until they exceed the maximum weight or height for that seat. At that point, they should move on to a booster seat and shoulder belt. For the Britax Marathon, this means your child should stay in it ...


5

Getting a convertible car seat saves you money in having to purchase two seats, but I would recommend an infant seat. When you first bring that little peanut home, they are so tiny and dwarfed by any car seat. The infant seat has them in a reclined position that I have not seen in a convertible seat. When my son was a little over a year and we were ...


5

These seats are designed to be newborn-friendly. Any of them causing any physical damage to a child is unthinkable. Such seat should never have been made and accepted for sale. Unless you bought the cheapest seat on a flea market, you're going to be ok. Long trips are discouraged because your child is restricted to the same position for their duration. If a ...


4

We bought a stroller that came with an infant seat which made it really nice because the infant seat locked right into the car or into the stroller without waking our son. The infant seat lasted us a while too so we did not have to buy a car seat for a while. If I remember correctly the seat was adjustable so it could sit upright a little bit making it work ...


4

There are pros and cons to each: If you buy an infant car seat, it can do things like attach to shopping carts and strollers so that you don't have to move and wake your baby, and acting as a standalone carrier or rocker when you travel. I don't know of any convertible car seat that can do these things. If you buy a convertible car seat, you forgo the ...


4

To keep her warm. To keep other people from touching her. (Rarely) To help her sleep, parrot-style. Other than that, I try to keep things open for my baby.


4

You need two different prams (or possibly three). Since you're avid runners, you should get a separate pram for that purpose. They are usually three-wheeled. The reason is that everyday prams aren't meant for high speeds. Look for ones that have: a long wheel base with fixed wheels (runs more straight) big, bicycle-style wheels (comfort) brake lever on ...


4

A good rule of thumb is that if you pull on the car seat, if it moves more than 1 inch from front to back, or side to side, it is not tight enough. Not having the seat installed properly is a very common problem, that frequently goes unnoticed until there is an accident. There are many locations in the US, and possibly other countries, that offer free car ...


4

I am pretty sure that somewhere in the instructions for one of our car seats it says that when the car seat is installed properly there should be no more than 1/2 inch of side-to-side movement when you push/pull on the car seat firmly. If there is anyone in the house who is going to install a car seat, it's me so anytime we have to remove a car seat ...


4

Imagine what happens in a frontal crash - an unanchored object will continue forwards at the speed it was travelling (say 70mph if we are talking about a UK motorway). So with the seatbelt holding the child, if the car came to an instant halt, the booster would effectively hit the child at 70mph in the back of the knees. (Yes I know this is a huge ...


3

Hmmmm...the book is somewhat confusing because it indicates that it MUST be in the fully-reclined position in rear-facing, but then it says "This child restraint must always face the rear of the vehicle and be in the fully reclined position when the child weighs between 5-35 lbs. and is less than one year old" which sort of leads me to believe that once the ...


3

I realize this is an OLD question, but I wanted to add that babies with reflux can sometimes become more uncomfortable in carseats based on the angle of the seat. My daughter had silent reflux and was pretty miserable in her infant carseat until we finally moved her up to a larger seat and she was able to sit more up-right. I know many parents of children ...


3

Protection from strong sunlight?


3

This seat should not be used - Period. Car seats are designed to do two things, restrain the occupant by not deforming and absorb/transfer energy by deforming in a controlled way. This seat is structurally compromised and will not perform correctly under load. The area below the break will not deform correctly and will absorb less energy than designed ...



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